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Fitting aftermarket wheels to Tesla wheel bore size help

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by bkenchan, Dec 5, 2013.

  1. bkenchan

    bkenchan Member

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    I found on the forum that the bore size is 65mm I think. If I bought aftermarket wheels that have a larger bore size, what do I need to do in order to make it fit? I want them to be hub centric. Would getting something like a ring or a shim work? What is the right way of doing this correctly?
     
  2. mnx

    mnx 2013 P85

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    Yup, what you need is centering rings. They make them in plastic or aluminum, although the plastic ones are more common. Places like tirereack will include them automatically with your purcahse.
     
  3. bkenchan

    bkenchan Member

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    They're just called centering rings? The wheels I got are φ72.5 so what ring would I need? Not sure if I need to state a specific size.
     
  4. bkenchan

    bkenchan Member

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    Hub Centric Rings sizes:
    Wheel Bore: 72mm-72.64mm (2.83'')
    Hub on Car: 63.9mm (2.52'')

    Wheel Bore: 72mm-72.64mm (2.83'')
    Hub on Car: 64.15mm (2.53'')

    Which ring for the the hub on the car would work? Those are the two closest sizes that I found.
     
  5. LuckyLuke

    LuckyLuke Model S P85DL

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    This is what was used on my Vossen set:
    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1386404612.587568.jpg
     
  6. Mario Kadastik

    Mario Kadastik Active Member

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    Same for me. Ordered the 64.1 to 72.5 hub ring and when it arrived it was actually 64.2 and would slide around on the mount a bit. The tire shop said it's still ok because the bolts are good and big, but it kind of defeats the perfect balancing position that the center hole is supposed to give if it's a perfect fit so may lead to some vibration, but he though it unlikely for Tesla due to the bolts etc that should center it enough.
     
  7. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    Unfortunately, he was wrong. Telsa wheels are hub centric meaning they centre on the centre bore, not the bolt circle. In my opinion, if the wheel doesn't have the correct centre bore diameter, don't buy the wheel.
     
  8. Mario Kadastik

    Mario Kadastik Active Member

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    And you see many 64.1mm wheels in after market options? So far I've seen zip ;)
     
  9. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    Which is why I don't have any aftermarket wheels.
     
  10. Mario Kadastik

    Mario Kadastik Active Member

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    So one should park the Model S for winter? Because if it's delivered with 21" wheels you won't find winter tires and Tesla is unable to ship winter wheels. People in Norway are waiting and I know the other person whose Model S came on the same truck has yet to receive his winter wheels (he did buy with 19" wheels so he's living on the all-season tires, but those aren't really usable in our winters so he's taking a risk while waiting for the wheels). For me the 21" were illegal the moment the car drove off the truck. My only excuse to get out of a fine would have been that I'm driving to the tire shop as it's allowed to eliminate known defects if it's not a total road hazard (and it was +6 and wet tarmac, not icy on the day of delivery). Oh and I'm still waiting for my second set of TPMS from Tesla. So considering that there really is no options besides buying aftermarket rims. I have no plans to drive above 100km/h with those as they are winter wheels.
     
  11. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    There are places, at least in the U.S. that build wheels to your specs, such as Vellano. Of course, there's a 6-8 week delivery period so they're a bit late for your use. They aren't particularly cheap either although neither are Telsa's wheels. Yes, you gotta do what you gotta do.
     
  12. bkenchan

    bkenchan Member

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    So it is confirmed that the Model S center bore is 64mm on the dot? Are you guys rounding up/down?

    I was thinking maybe get the 63.9 and somehow it would pop right on there perfectly even though its a little smaller.
     
  13. wycolo

    wycolo Active Member

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    The OEM 19 inch rims rotate freely on the hub/centerbore interface. If you mount your own wheels *this* is how you know that the rim is properly on the hub. If it does NOT rotate freely then you know you are OFF the hub and will need to lift the wheel higher upwards onto the hub. Then it will 'rotate freely' as you finger tighten the lug nuts progressively until there is little rotation left. Now begin adding torque with a wrench a little bit at a time as you go around the wheel always skipping over to the 2nd lug nut. Lower the jack just enough to keep tire from turning as you get over 100 lb/ft with your wrench; idea being to keep as much weight as possible OFF the wheel until it is torqued to the minimum of 130 lb/ft. The result is 'bolt-centrically' mounted wheels since you recall how freely the wheel rotated as you began tightening the lug nuts. This freedom to rotate means there is a bit of extra clearance here and thus the accuracy of the drilled bolt center is what determines final wheel position. And the OEM rims are very accurately drilled, as are the after market rims, I'm sure.

    Hub/centerbore spacers are handy assist when you are installing a heavy wheel, but are not really necessary. A careful averaging of the 5 bolts should achieve a lack of visible run-out as the wheel is spun. Even if one of the bolts is slightly bent off 90* the other 4 will pull it back in line by the time you reach 130 lb/ft. That is why it is important to slowly bring up the torque. If you have no spacers, insist that the tire shop use ONLY a hand wrench to mount the wheels. If you can find spacers they are certainly worth the $5-US cost.
    --
     
  14. Dreamin

    Dreamin Member

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    #15 Dreamin, Dec 7, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2013
    Completely agree with wycolo. You don't need sub-millimeter precision here. 64mm +/- a few tenths will work fine. I mean 0.1mm is ~4 thousandths of an inch... a race wheel will deflect up to 65 thousandths of a inch under load! You need to torque the wheel in steps and in a star pattern exactly as posted above and you will NOT have any vibration.

    I have run dozens of aftermarket wheels on my cars... almost all with centering rings, a few without centering rings. Be diligent when installing the wheel and you wont have vibration. The clamping force of the lug nuts in the lug seats will mechanically center the wheel.

    What is important, however, is the correct shaped ring... as Tirerack posted above, "...different manufacturers will use different center bore types (tapered vs. straight / flange vs. recessed." Otherwise the ring wont seat property in the wheel center-bore, and you might as well not use one.

    To get the right rings: (1) Work with the wheel manufacture or (2) Work with a good,reputable tire shop that has many shapes/sizes of rings in stock (mine did). If people are trying to order rings online, it'll be a crap shoot if they fit the wheel at all.
     

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