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Flat tire cost estimation (do they really charge $200+ for labor?)

last week MY had a nail in one of the tires when I called Dublin tesla, they quoted me 350$, then one of my friends suggested me to check with Seever & Sons Tire in Pleasanton, they asked me to bring my car immediately, I dropped my MR around 3: 30 PM and my car were ready by 5:30 PM, and they did a good job and they chared 0$., they chared 0$ to remove the nail.
 
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Everybody reading this thread.. do yourself a big favor and go immediately order a $20 tire puncture plug kit off Amazon. Keep this kit + air compressor in your Tesla at all times. As many people have pointed out Teslas tend to have a lot of tire issues, most of them being punctures. This is an incredibly easy repair you can do yourself, in about 2 mins and you do not need to remove the wheel from the car to fix this. I ran into the same issue, luckily wasn't far from a used Tire shop and they plugged the tire in a couple of mins and only charged me $10 for the fix.


  • Find a safe place to park
  • Make sure to drive the car forward/back enough where you can easily access the nail/screw (helps to turn your front wheel, if it happens to the front)
  • Remove the nail/screw with some pliers
  • Immediately clean up the actual puncture area with the file tool (leave the tool in to keep air from leaking)
  • Pull the rubber plug 50/50 through the hole in the fix tool, lubricate the plug with rubber cement making it much easier to insert, and push about half of the plug into the tire
  • Pull out the fix tool. The plug should remain in the tire and the leak should now be 100% sealed.
  • Snip or cut off any remaining plug so that the tire can roll completely flat
  • Finally, air up your tire to 42psi

This video shows you the entire process

You will be back on the road in no time. And won't have to bother waiting on a tow truck, paying Tesla $300 for a new tire or driving around on a flat tire looking for a tire shop to do the same repair and charging you for the same repair. If you use this kit once, it will be worth every penny. And it works on any car so it's a great kit to have for any emergency stop.

Also, be advised you need to know the difference between a puncture and a blowout. A puncture is just that.. a nail/screw-like object in the tire.. probably picked up from a construction site or driving on the shoulder of the road. A blowout... OR a puncture that is outside of the tire tread cannot be repaired. In that case, the tire needs to be replaced completely.
 
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Everybody reading this thread.. do yourself a big favor and go immediately order a $20 tire puncture plug kit off Amazon. Keep this kit + air compressor in your Tesla at all times. As many people have pointed out Teslas tend to have a lot of tire issues, most of them being punctures. This is an incredibly easy repair you can do yourself, in about 2 mins and you do not need to remove the wheel from the car to fix this. I ran into the same issue, luckily wasn't far from a used Tire shop and they plugged the tire in a couple of mins and only charged me $10 for the fix.


  • Find a safe place to park
  • Make sure to drive the car forward/back enough where you can easily access the nail/screw (helps to turn your front wheel, if it happens to the front)
  • Remove the nail/screw with some pliers
  • Immediately clean up the actual puncture area with the file tool (leave the tool in to keep air from leaking)
  • Pull the rubber plug 50/50 through the hole in the fix tool, lubricate the plug with rubber cement making it much easier to insert, and push about half of the plug into the tire
  • Pull out the fix tool. The plug should remain in the tire and the leak should now be 100% sealed.
  • Snip or cut off any remaining plug so that the tire can roll completely flat
  • Finally, air up your tire to 42psi

This video shows you the entire process

You will be back on the road in no time. And won't have to bother waiting on a tow truck, paying Tesla $300 for a new tire or driving around on a flat tire looking for a tire shop to do the same repair and charging you for the same repair. If you use this kit once, it will be worth every penny. And it works on any car so it's a great kit to have for any emergency stop.

Also, be advised you need to know the difference between a puncture and a blowout. A puncture is just that.. a nail/screw-like object in the tire.. probably picked up from a construction site or driving on the shoulder of the road. A blowout... OR a puncture that is outside of the tire tread cannot be repaired. In that case, the tire needs to be replaced completely.
I wouldn't necessarily say Teslas tend to have a lot of tire issues. Tires are tires, if you hit a nail or screw it will puncture no matter what car you're driving. These self plug kits are good for emergency situations, i.e. stranded in the middle of nowhere and your tire is leaking with the object in your tire. If you're around civilization and your tire is slowly leaking or not leaking at all, you're better off driving to a tire shop for a proper plug. They type where they take the tire off and plug from the inside. You also need to be able to determine if the puncture is far enough away from the sidewall for a safe plug. Some tire shops will even plug for free. Americas Tire in California does.
I'm all for doing my own repairs, but I usually leave tires to people who aren't arm chair quarterbacks (myself).
 
I wouldn't necessarily say Teslas tend to have a lot of tire issues. Tires are tires, if you hit a nail or screw it will puncture no matter what car you're driving. These self plug kits are good for emergency situations, i.e. stranded in the middle of nowhere and your tire is leaking with the object in your tire. If you're around civilization and your tire is slowly leaking or not leaking at all, you're better off driving to a tire shop for a proper plug. They type where they take the tire off and plug from the inside. You also need to be able to determine if the puncture is far enough away from the sidewall for a safe plug. Some tire shops will even plug for free. Americas Tire in California does.
I'm all for doing my own repairs, but I usually leave tires to people who aren't arm chair quarterbacks (myself).
I have to disagree there. I find there are a ton of tire issues with Teslas. Most of the people I personally know with Teslas have had tire issues. So much so I was specifically warned about this by several Tesla owners before purchasing my car. Same with the cracked/chipped windshield and making sure to get $0 deductible on glass. It's an extremely common problem among the Tesla community. As someone else pointed out.. maybe its something to do with the extra weight of battery-powered vehicles .. or possibly the high air pressure.

Granted I agree these circumstances are still random. But you still cannot ignore how popular tire & windshield issues tend to be with Tesla owners.

There's absolutely nothing wrong with calling the tow truck or driving carefully to a tire shop for them to do the repair. If that's all that you are comfortable with, then by all means.. please stick to that. But I'm not going to pretend that plugging a tire hole in a tire is scary or difficult. It is insanely easy to do. Easier than changing a spare tire even. And if you've ever actually take the time to try it yourself, then I have no doubt you'd actually come back and edit your comment to also agree it's an option that should be kept in the vehicle at all times.

Who knows when or where a flat tire will even occur? Could be the middle of the night. Could be the middle of nowhere. Could be in a dangerous setting where you cannot afford to wait for help. Being able to do this quick repair is an awesome option depending on your specific circumstances.
 
I have to disagree there. I find there are a ton of tire issues with Teslas. Most of the people I personally know with Teslas have had tire issues. So much so I was specifically warned about this by several Tesla owners before purchasing my car. Same with the cracked/chipped windshield and making sure to get $0 deductible on glass. It's an extremely common problem among the Tesla community. As someone else pointed out.. maybe its something to do with the extra weight of battery-powered vehicles .. or possibly the high air pressure.

Granted I agree these circumstances are still random. But you still cannot ignore how popular tire & windshield issues tend to be with Tesla owners.

There's absolutely nothing wrong with calling the tow truck or driving carefully to a tire shop for them to do the repair. If that's all that you are comfortable with, then by all means.. please stick to that. But I'm not going to pretend that plugging a tire hole in a tire is scary or difficult. It is insanely easy to do. Easier than changing a spare tire even. And if you've ever actually take the time to try it yourself, then I have no doubt you'd actually come back and edit your comment to also agree it's an option that should be kept in the vehicle at all times.

Who knows when or where a flat tire will even occur? Could be the middle of the night. Could be the middle of nowhere. Could be in a dangerous setting where you cannot afford to wait for help. Being able to do this quick repair is an awesome option depending on your specific circumstances.
All EVs are heavier due to the battery packs, so they do put more strain on tires than ICE equivalents. This just means they have a tendency to wear through tires quicker. This does not mean they will pick up foreign objects more than another type of vehicle. If you ask Tesla owners only if they have had tire issues, then yes, of course you will hear an increased number of issues with Tesla based on the population you asked. Personally I've got 29,000 miles on my original Model S tires and still have 6/32nds of tread left.
Same with windshield issues. It's all about being in the wrong place/wrong time to get a tire puncture or a rock in your windshield. The vehicle you drive won't make a difference.
Plugging isn't scary or difficult, although it is more challenging to do it correctly if you have foam tires. You would need to somehow ensure you can get the plug in far enough through the glued on foam. The majority of punctures are slow leakers or non-leakers. You're better off just leaving in place and driving home or driving to a tire shop to repair.
If you want to sit on the side of a busy freeway at night looking for the nail in the dark, then trying to plug it, that's all you.
 
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When I had my MY tire punctured by a nail the first time, I first took it to my Costco tire center since that's where I go for this with all my previous ICE cars. It only costs $12 to fix a tire there. However, Costco told me that because Tesla tires are lined with a custom mesh on the inside to reduce road noise, they can't repair it. So I made a service appt with Tesla service center. My initial in-app estimate also came out to $400-500 range, but the rep told me that it's just an estimate. Depending on where the puncture is, it can be patched as opposed to replaced. If the puncture is in the tread section of the tire, then yes, patch will work. But if it's on the sidewalls, then no, it has to be replaced. Mine happens to be in the tread so it ended up just costing me $80 for the labor, no material. This was back in Nov, 2021, in FL.
 

Darmie

Super Member
Supporting Member
Jan 13, 2016
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Clear Lake TX.
Everybody reading this thread.. do yourself a big favor and go immediately order a $20 tire puncture plug kit off Amazon. Keep this kit + air compressor in your Tesla at all times. As many people have pointed out Teslas tend to have a lot of tire issues, most of them being punctures. This is an incredibly easy repair you can do yourself, in about 2 mins and you do not need to remove the wheel from the car to fix this. I ran into the same issue, luckily wasn't far from a used Tire shop and they plugged the tire in a couple of mins and only charged me $10 for the fix.


  • Find a safe place to park
  • Make sure to drive the car forward/back enough where you can easily access the nail/screw (helps to turn your front wheel, if it happens to the front)
  • Remove the nail/screw with some pliers
  • Immediately clean up the actual puncture area with the file tool (leave the tool in to keep air from leaking)
  • Pull the rubber plug 50/50 through the hole in the fix tool, lubricate the plug with rubber cement making it much easier to insert, and push about half of the plug into the tire
  • Pull out the fix tool. The plug should remain in the tire and the leak should now be 100% sealed.
  • Snip or cut off any remaining plug so that the tire can roll completely flat
  • Finally, air up your tire to 42psi

This video shows you the entire process

You will be back on the road in no time. And won't have to bother waiting on a tow truck, paying Tesla $300 for a new tire or driving around on a flat tire looking for a tire shop to do the same repair and charging you for the same repair. If you use this kit once, it will be worth every penny. And it works on any car so it's a great kit to have for any emergency stop.

Also, be advised you need to know the difference between a puncture and a blowout. A puncture is just that.. a nail/screw-like object in the tire.. probably picked up from a construction site or driving on the shoulder of the road. A blowout... OR a puncture that is outside of the tire tread cannot be repaired. In that case, the tire needs to be replaced completely.
I second this. Even if the puncture is near the sidewall, it may hold enough to get to where you can get some help. I will say this is not the easiest thing to do but can be done. Keep using the reamer tool until you can push the plug in the tire.
 
I second this. Even if the puncture is near the sidewall, it may hold enough to get to where you can get some help. I will say this is not the easiest thing to do but can be done. Keep using the reamer tool until you can push the plug in the tire.
The last Tesla owner I shared this with.. took my advice and ordered the kit. Literally picked up a nail while waiting for Amazon to deliver it lol!!!

We were sharing jokes back & forth while he waiting for the tow truck to come and get him.
 

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