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Flat Tyre

Discussion in 'Australia & New Zealand' started by Wattup, May 1, 2015.

  1. Wattup

    Wattup Member

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    This may have been covered already but I have only been able to find US threads on this topic.

    Do the current owners in Australia all cary just the Tesla pump and goop to repair a flat?
    Does anyone carry a jack and if so which one?
    I would not carry a spare but apparently there is a hole plug repair kit that does a good job, has anyone used it?


    Of course none of these would work if you got a cut in the side wall (from the rim) as a result of hitting something like an unpainted concrete curb in a Maccas carpark at night . I have self healing Continentals that went flat in about 3 seconds as a 2cm slice in the sidewall is apparently well beyond the self healing scope.
     
  2. ZTrekus

    ZTrekus Member

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    I've always wondered if the next lot kf tyres you install on a Tesla should be run-flats
     
  3. TesAus

    TesAus Member

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    DBorn carries a full size spare, jack etc in his froot. He did post details somewhere in the Australian sub forum here. Hopefully you could find it with a search?
     
  4. lonewolf313

    lonewolf313 Member

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    I found Dborn's photos on "Tesla In Australia" thread - comment #3236 on page 324
     
  5. Dborn

    Dborn Confirmed

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    Obtained at Repco. Works well. Compact trolley jack. Breaker bar. Torque wrench from eBay.
     
  6. Wattup

    Wattup Member

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    Looks like a neat fit. What I have read so far is that a wheel does not fit in a dual motor car frunk so this option would not work in that case. I assume therefore that the tesla pump and liquid option does not need a jack. Has anyone had to use it yet.
     
  7. meloccom

    meloccom Moderator Aus/NZ

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    IIRC heosat had a flat and he called Tesla Rodside assist and they brought out a temporary spare.
    I have opted for the electric pump and fix a flat goo.
     
  8. Dborn

    Dborn Confirmed

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    The goo bit is what bothers me. Perhaps you need to have a good talk to your local Bob Jane or Beaurepairs bloke about this stuff. How does it impact the tyre pressure monitor sensors, what does it do in terms of them repairing your tyre, etc? A sidewall injury or even one close to sidewall often times will not be repaired for safety reasons. Murphys law says that is where you will likely get the damage. Also, the wheel size is not all that common and the likelihood of your nearest tyre store having one in stock is not good. For all these reasons, i chose to go the route i did. Also, the Heosat solution may have worked for him, over a weekend in Sydney, but what if you are say, in the Hunter Valley or the Blue mountains? How long are you gonna wait for a wheel to be sent out and fitted? That may be acceptable to you, but it was not to me.
     
  9. Mark E

    Mark E Member

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    I bought the Tesla compressor and goo kit - that way any damage to the sensors would be a warranty claim. I agree about the wheel size etc being a problem if there is any serious damage after hours or away from the big smoke.
     
  10. Jimat

    Jimat Member

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    i have gone for belt AND braces .
    Tesla pump with goop - which they claim will not damage the TPMS sensors.
    Plus BMW Z5 space saver spare with scissor jack ($50 from a wreckers- ford bravo 4wd ute one), breaker bar and ARB tyre repair kit. The spare fits in the froot with the other bits.
    Overkill I know but I live in the bush and would not expect roadside assist to be available in any sort of reasonable time frame.
    Re a new tyre- AFAIK the only supplier for the OEM tyre at the moment in Australia is Tesla.
    My tyre mob, Goodyear Tyre service, can't even find a source for the specific sized 19" Eagle tyre my cars is fitted with.
     
  11. TesAus

    TesAus Member

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    Unless I am mis-reading it there appear to be at least 12 different tyres from multiple brands (Goodyear, Pirrelli, Bridgestone, Continental, Falken etc.) of the right size 245 45R19 and load/speed rating of 98V or above (many are 102Y). I am confused as to why availability would be an issue? It is not like when we got a new Toyota Kluger about 8 years ago and there was only one tyre from one supplier that was the right size.

    I admit it may be an issue if you wanted a single tyre, but if you were buying two or more (to keep balance on same axle) then shouldn't be an issue?
     
  12. Dborn

    Dborn Confirmed

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    What you say is correct. However, in my experience, the exact size you want is never in stock, and if it is, is it a brand you would be happy with?
    Some research I have done indicates that the Pirelli P7 Cinturato would be an excellent replacement for durability and quietness. From what I can tell, the Goodyears on my car are really quite noisy. If you want to stay with Goodyear, then the Excellence model seems to be the best available here. Quiet, low rolling resistance and durability were my criteria. The downside to harder rubber is grip. In the end, it comes down to the type of driving you do, and the performance you think you need. There are others on my short list, from Yokohama, Kumho, Bridgestone and Hankook. Michelin and Dunlop also figure in there. ( with specific models in each).
     
  13. alpal

    alpal Member

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    i know this is bringing up an old topic but I had a problematic situation on the weekend when my wife and I had a flat in country Vic in her BMW X3. After ringing all the tyre companies in an eighty km range (about 12) and an actual BMW dealer in a nearby town, we discovered none carried the tyre we needed (coincidently 245 45R19s).

    The best BMWs roadside assist could offer was a tow to the nearest larger town to arrange a tyre to be sent from Melb. Not a great solution. Stranded on a Fri arvo in some town miles from our destination.

    we had run flats, the reason we didn't carry a spare, so I made a dash for the nearest town (52kms away) but in the right direction. I thought we might be able to repair the tyre.

    Well our run flats didn't fare too well and by the time I found the nearest tyre firm the tyre in question was shredded. Nothing to do but order a new one to be fitted earliest by Monday. ****.

    luckily, country hospitality kicked in and the owner of the firm actually lent us his car to use over the weekend. Our destination now wasn't that far away. Nice bloke. Wayne in Bairnesdale Tyrepower. Come Monday morning, 9.15 to be precise, Wayne had us on our way! Nice bloke. Did I mention he worked at Bairnesdale Tyrepower (apologies for blatant plug, he was a nice bloke).

    clearly this has got me thinking about my Tesla as I'm planning some really great road trips and I'm not too sure about the tyre goo and pump solution.

    Should I carry a spare and buy a jack? Are there any more recent experiences on this topic anyone can relate to me? Especially country experiences. Thanks
     
  14. WhiteStar

    WhiteStar Member

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    Yes in fact I got a puncture on Friday just before a long drive from Byron Bay to the Sunshine Coast. I had to use the Tesla inflation kit with the white goop. It worked first time after which I went to the local tire shop.
    The guy asked how I fixed it to get it to the shop. As soon as I mentioned the word ‘goop’, he refused to repair it saying it was messy & toxic. After I thanked him & went to leave, he said he'd do it carefully if I brought it back the following week. I had to get to the Sunshine Coast so I drove the almost 300 km without a problem. No problem on the return either but I think I’ll invest in a Repco jack, BMW X3 (coincidentally :)) F25 space saver kit & centering ring just in case the goop doesn’t work next time.


    BMW X3 F25 Spare Tire Kit : Bimmerzone.com
     
  15. alpal

    alpal Member

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    Thanks Whitestar. When I got my Tessie I bought the Turbine tyres (post purchase) so I have a complete spare set of tyres but was reluctant to take up valuable boot space (I have and AWD) with it. I suppose I'll have to and I better get a jack.

    anyone else had some incidents with tyres?
     
  16. ColinA

    ColinA Member

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    Can anyone recommend a good "Tesla Friendly" jack? The jack point/method is different and I suspect regular jacks won't be fit for purpose. Haven't researched it yet, but plan to have a spare wheel and Jack prior to our Tassie trip.
     
  17. green1

    green1 Active Member

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    The Tesla jack points aren't really anything that special, any bottle jack would do fine for a portable solution.
     
  18. raynewman

    raynewman Member

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    After much head scratching, wife and I have figured that the last tyre problem we had (in a full size car*) was 19 years ago and quarter million km - so, I don't carry a spare.

    * Don't count smart car, audi a1 or citron c5 as they had miserable little tyres an miserable little wheels.
     
  19. mspohr

    mspohr Active Member

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    I have decided to stock my car with a small 12v portable air compressor and a tire plug kit. Total cost less than $50. I don't expect to ever have to use it.
    In thinking back, I have never had a "stranded on the road flat tire" in 50 years of driving so I am not concerned. (Of course, now that I've said that, it will probably happen tomorrow.)
    In the unlikely event that I do get a flat tire on the road that can't be fixed with a plug, there is roadside assistance.
     
  20. ColinA

    ColinA Member

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    I guess we are all coloured by our own experiences. Only two years ago I had a tyre blow out on a country road in the middle of Italy in an Alpha. Fortunately it had one of those narrow temporary wheels like the BMW one referred to below and I changed it and was on my way.

    Where it happened had no mobile coverage and hardly any other cars went by (none while we were there). Without that spare I was screwed. I can imagine parts of Tasmania where we will go are similar and visions of the past come up to haunt me!

    If I was just city driving I'd rely on road side assistance and wouldn't bother.
     

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