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FSD Beta Experience - Be Careful What You Wish For

I've been in the FSD Beta since last Christmas. I'm reading many posts from people frustrated they are not on the Beta yet, and others who are on the Beta and complaining about it.

So, I want to give everyone my experiences with FSD Beta, try to make everyone understand what's involved in it, and hopefully dissuade several of you from trying to get into the Beta.

00EE7D8B-DFD2-4E41-B7F2-2D6BCB4E7B10.jpeg


It's a Commitment
----------------------------------
I think many people are excited by the notion of FSD Beta, and watching YouTube videos or Twitter videos of people in FSD Beta thinking it will be easy and smooth. Let me assure you that it's a commitment to be in FSD Beta. It's not easy, and it's not smooth. You are committing to use a system that is far from perfect and agreeing to help improve the system by putting the car through various routes, and reporting problems as they occur. You're not going to be using your car as you did before. If you're not willing to use FSD Beta as much as possible, and thinking you'll only use casually, then I'd suggest it's not for you. Tesla needs data to improve the system. The more data, the faster the system develops. And we, the FSD Beta participants, want the end result in our lifetimes. :) Think of it as an unpaid internship.

It's Stressful
----------------------------------
I read many posts on TMC from people who are stressed over the Safety Score before even getting invited into FSD Beta. They worry about pissing off cars around them as they "drive like grandma" to keep a high score. Once you're in the FSD Beta, your stress level will go up even higher. Now, your car may perform odd maneuvers, suddenly brake, swerve left or right just before a turn, become paralyzed at unprotected turns, turn in a very unnatural or unsmooth way (ie: jerky), etc. You will likely get flashed with high-beams and honked at. Personally, I get those at least twice a week. Occasionally a middle-finger is extended when someone aggressively goes around you and cuts you off. I've even been coal-rolled. You need to have a calm demeanor and understand that you will be pissing people off. I have custom bumper stickers warning people behind me to help ease some of the stress I'm causing them, or at least letting them know they should stay back or go around me.

It's Mentally and Physically Draining
----------------------------------
Gone are the times when your brain goes into autopilot when you're driving, listening to music, or talking on the phone. Instead, you're hyper focused on the drive. I tell my friends that 80-90% of the time FSD Beta drives very well. 10-20% of the time it tries to kill me. :) Because of that, you cannot let your guard down for a moment. Many testers have their foot hovering or ready to engage, as the car could suddenly slow down in the middle of a turn, or approaching a flashing yellow caution sign. It might mistake an angled traffic light that's not meant for your lane and suddenly attempt to run a red light. It could make a sudden lane change, or try to make a turn from the wrong lane. I've had it try to go straight through an intersection while in a right turn-only lane.

Constant Engagement and Disengagement - And Reporting
----------------------------------
You will be engaging the system and disengaging it constantly. Is it getting too close to that parked car? Coming too fast at a speed bump? Did it become paralyzed at a 4-way stop where pedestrians are crossing? Is it in the wrong lane for the exit you need to take, and going to miss it? In many cases you will need to disengage FSD, perform a maneuver yourself and then re-engage FSD - and report it to Tesla. It's also important that you report everything to Tesla so they can improve the system. That can be difficult, if your car just freaked out and you had to disengage FSD and take over instantly to avoid something bad from happening. Your first reaction isn't usually to find and press a little camera button to report it - but you have to get into that habit.

Passengers
----------------------------------
I do most of my FSD Beta driving alone, as the system can really freak out passengers - and in many cases cause motion sickness in those susceptible to it. I've read many posts from people who say their BF/GF or spouse simply will not let them use FSD Beta while they are in the car.

Final Thoughts
----------------------------------
Some people might read the above and think, "I just won't use FSD Beta that much." If you're thinking you'll use FSD Beta a little, perhaps setting aside time to do a small trip with it from time to time, but otherwise driving the car yourself, then I think FSD Beta is not for you. You're committing to help Tesla improve a system, and with limited Beta participants (currently ~60K), your casual attitude towards the program could be negatively affecting it. There may be someone like me who is ready to totally commit to it, but cannot get into the program because someone else took a spot who really doesn't care that much. Also, if you've read all this and thought "Tesla should be paying me to do all this!", then the FSD Beta is not for you.

So be careful what you wish for... FSD Beta is not all fun and games.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

doubleshot

'21MSLR | M/W,21,FSD | MF455 12/3
Supporting Member
Mar 8, 2021
1,174
3,722
Marietta, GA
The "counter" has never reset, even after getting the past two software updates.
The counter doesn't reset. Why would you think it reset after an update? Also, it should be 5 disengagements. This is from the release notes but I'ma have to check what the car says is the counter.

Improper usage is when you, or another driver of your vehicle, receive five 'Forced Autopilot Disengagements'. A disengagement is when the Autopilot system disengages for the remainder of a trip after the driver receives several audio and visual warnings for inattentiveness.
 
It Is pretty amazing people keep saying they are getting strikes and don't realize it. Because it's very obvious when you're about to get kicked. I think I've only gotten to once where it's done the flashing. But you have to apply gentle pressure to the steering wheel. Just light grasp doesn't do anything. The system has no idea your hand is there. Just rest your hand with a little more tension to it and you're golden. The yoke helps a ton with this tho as it's easier to keep some pressure because the bottom is flat.

I've had fsd beta for 6 months. I still don't have a ding.
No - that’s how it’s supposed to work but it doesn’t always. I’ve had 3 strikes. The first was technically my fault - I was letting FSD navigate a turn and was focusing on the road so I didn’t notice the beeping until it was too late.

The second two strikes had no beeping at all. The screen may have flashed blue but I was driving into the sun and it would have been hard to see. On the second of these I had just glanced at the screen and it wasn’t flashing then. I also had my hand on the wheel. Regardless, there was little to no warning and definitely no audible warning.
 
No - that’s how it’s supposed to work but it doesn’t always. I’ve had 3 strikes. The first was technically my fault - I was letting FSD navigate a turn and was focusing on the road so I didn’t notice the beeping until it was too late.

The second two strikes had no beeping at all. The screen may have flashed blue but I was driving into the sun and it would have been hard to see. On the second of these I had just glanced at the screen and it wasn’t flashing then. I also had my hand on the wheel. Regardless, there was little to no warning and definitely no audible warning.
I’ve gotten a couple in 10.12 wherein there was essentially no warning. Very interesting.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: sleepydoc
I've been in the FSD Beta since last Christmas. I'm reading many posts from people frustrated they are not on the Beta yet, and others who are on the Beta and complaining about it.

So, I want to give everyone my experiences with FSD Beta, try to make everyone understand what's involved in it, and hopefully dissuade several of you from trying to get into the Beta.

View attachment 773827


It's a Commitment
----------------------------------
I think many people are excited by the notion of FSD Beta, and watching YouTube videos or Twitter videos of people in FSD Beta thinking it will be easy and smooth. Let me assure you that it's a commitment to be in FSD Beta. It's not easy, and it's not smooth. You are committing to use a system that is far from perfect and agreeing to help improve the system by putting the car through various routes, and reporting problems as they occur. You're not going to be using your car as you did before. If you're not willing to use FSD Beta as much as possible, and thinking you'll only use casually, then I'd suggest it's not for you. Tesla needs data to improve the system. The more data, the faster the system develops. And we, the FSD Beta participants, want the end result in our lifetimes. :) Think of it as an unpaid internship.

It's Stressful
----------------------------------
I read many posts on TMC from people who are stressed over the Safety Score before even getting invited into FSD Beta. They worry about pissing off cars around them as they "drive like grandma" to keep a high score. Once you're in the FSD Beta, your stress level will go up even higher. Now, your car may perform odd maneuvers, suddenly brake, swerve left or right just before a turn, become paralyzed at unprotected turns, turn in a very unnatural or unsmooth way (ie: jerky), etc. You will likely get flashed with high-beams and honked at. Personally, I get those at least twice a week. Occasionally a middle-finger is extended when someone aggressively goes around you and cuts you off. I've even been coal-rolled. You need to have a calm demeanor and understand that you will be pissing people off. I have custom bumper stickers warning people behind me to help ease some of the stress I'm causing them, or at least letting them know they should stay back or go around me.

It's Mentally and Physically Draining
----------------------------------
Gone are the times when your brain goes into autopilot when you're driving, listening to music, or talking on the phone. Instead, you're hyper focused on the drive. I tell my friends that 80-90% of the time FSD Beta drives very well. 10-20% of the time it tries to kill me. :) Because of that, you cannot let your guard down for a moment. Many testers have their foot hovering or ready to engage, as the car could suddenly slow down in the middle of a turn, or approaching a flashing yellow caution sign. It might mistake an angled traffic light that's not meant for your lane and suddenly attempt to run a red light. It could make a sudden lane change, or try to make a turn from the wrong lane. I've had it try to go straight through an intersection while in a right turn-only lane.

Constant Engagement and Disengagement - And Reporting
----------------------------------
You will be engaging the system and disengaging it constantly. Is it getting too close to that parked car? Coming too fast at a speed bump? Did it become paralyzed at a 4-way stop where pedestrians are crossing? Is it in the wrong lane for the exit you need to take, and going to miss it? In many cases you will need to disengage FSD, perform a maneuver yourself and then re-engage FSD - and report it to Tesla. It's also important that you report everything to Tesla so they can improve the system. That can be difficult, if your car just freaked out and you had to disengage FSD and take over instantly to avoid something bad from happening. Your first reaction isn't usually to find and press a little camera button to report it - but you have to get into that habit.

Passengers
----------------------------------
I do most of my FSD Beta driving alone, as the system can really freak out passengers - and in many cases cause motion sickness in those susceptible to it. I've read many posts from people who say their BF/GF or spouse simply will not let them use FSD Beta while they are in the car.

Final Thoughts
----------------------------------
Some people might read the above and think, "I just won't use FSD Beta that much." If you're thinking you'll use FSD Beta a little, perhaps setting aside time to do a small trip with it from time to time, but otherwise driving the car yourself, then I think FSD Beta is not for you. You're committing to help Tesla improve a system, and with limited Beta participants (currently ~60K), your casual attitude towards the program could be negatively affecting it. There may be someone like me who is ready to totally commit to it, but cannot get into the program because someone else took a spot who really doesn't care that much. Also, if you've read all this and thought "Tesla should be paying me to do all this!", then the FSD Beta is not for you.

So be careful what you wish for... FSD Beta is not all fun and games.
Wow this was a great detailed review - like a doctorate in FSD 👍 I did not want to have fsd on my M3 on order - and really don’t want it now - afraid to use autopilot when I get my car as I won’t put up with phantom braking - Alan g
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dewg
I've been in the FSD Beta since last Christmas. I'm reading many posts from people frustrated they are not on the Beta yet, and others who are on the Beta and complaining about it.

So, I want to give everyone my experiences with FSD Beta, try to make everyone understand what's involved in it, and hopefully dissuade several of you from trying to get into the Beta.

View attachment 773827


It's a Commitment
----------------------------------
I think many people are excited by the notion of FSD Beta, and watching YouTube videos or Twitter videos of people in FSD Beta thinking it will be easy and smooth. Let me assure you that it's a commitment to be in FSD Beta. It's not easy, and it's not smooth. You are committing to use a system that is far from perfect and agreeing to help improve the system by putting the car through various routes, and reporting problems as they occur. You're not going to be using your car as you did before. If you're not willing to use FSD Beta as much as possible, and thinking you'll only use casually, then I'd suggest it's not for you. Tesla needs data to improve the system. The more data, the faster the system develops. And we, the FSD Beta participants, want the end result in our lifetimes. :) Think of it as an unpaid internship.

It's Stressful
----------------------------------
I read many posts on TMC from people who are stressed over the Safety Score before even getting invited into FSD Beta. They worry about pissing off cars around them as they "drive like grandma" to keep a high score. Once you're in the FSD Beta, your stress level will go up even higher. Now, your car may perform odd maneuvers, suddenly brake, swerve left or right just before a turn, become paralyzed at unprotected turns, turn in a very unnatural or unsmooth way (ie: jerky), etc. You will likely get flashed with high-beams and honked at. Personally, I get those at least twice a week. Occasionally a middle-finger is extended when someone aggressively goes around you and cuts you off. I've even been coal-rolled. You need to have a calm demeanor and understand that you will be pissing people off. I have custom bumper stickers warning people behind me to help ease some of the stress I'm causing them, or at least letting them know they should stay back or go around me.

It's Mentally and Physically Draining
----------------------------------
Gone are the times when your brain goes into autopilot when you're driving, listening to music, or talking on the phone. Instead, you're hyper focused on the drive. I tell my friends that 80-90% of the time FSD Beta drives very well. 10-20% of the time it tries to kill me. :) Because of that, you cannot let your guard down for a moment. Many testers have their foot hovering or ready to engage, as the car could suddenly slow down in the middle of a turn, or approaching a flashing yellow caution sign. It might mistake an angled traffic light that's not meant for your lane and suddenly attempt to run a red light. It could make a sudden lane change, or try to make a turn from the wrong lane. I've had it try to go straight through an intersection while in a right turn-only lane.

Constant Engagement and Disengagement - And Reporting
----------------------------------
You will be engaging the system and disengaging it constantly. Is it getting too close to that parked car? Coming too fast at a speed bump? Did it become paralyzed at a 4-way stop where pedestrians are crossing? Is it in the wrong lane for the exit you need to take, and going to miss it? In many cases you will need to disengage FSD, perform a maneuver yourself and then re-engage FSD - and report it to Tesla. It's also important that you report everything to Tesla so they can improve the system. That can be difficult, if your car just freaked out and you had to disengage FSD and take over instantly to avoid something bad from happening. Your first reaction isn't usually to find and press a little camera button to report it - but you have to get into that habit.

Passengers
----------------------------------
I do most of my FSD Beta driving alone, as the system can really freak out passengers - and in many cases cause motion sickness in those susceptible to it. I've read many posts from people who say their BF/GF or spouse simply will not let them use FSD Beta while they are in the car.

Final Thoughts
----------------------------------
Some people might read the above and think, "I just won't use FSD Beta that much." If you're thinking you'll use FSD Beta a little, perhaps setting aside time to do a small trip with it from time to time, but otherwise driving the car yourself, then I think FSD Beta is not for you. You're committing to help Tesla improve a system, and with limited Beta participants (currently ~60K), your casual attitude towards the program could be negatively affecting it. There may be someone like me who is ready to totally commit to it, but cannot get into the program because someone else took a spot who really doesn't care that much. Also, if you've read all this and thought "Tesla should be paying me to do all this!", then the FSD Beta is not for you.

So be careful what you wish for... FSD Beta is not all fun and games.
Great posting and that is exactly what I am learning after receiving the fsd beta access a week ago!
 
  • Like
Reactions: sleepydoc and Dewg

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