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FSD reflections after 3mo of use

TLDR:

What driving conditions have you found challenging for FSDb?

- FSDb is the best driver assist package available today, but is absolutely not ready to take unsupervised control of your vehicle.
- It would work better (and possibly more safely) with a more advanced driver monitoring system and making it hands free. High def maps might improve things to allow this degree of automation also.
- It struggles with turn lanes. This is probably better in areas with better mapping, but if its market niche is its ability to work on all types of roads, they need to do a better job with this.
- It allows closer proximity to other vehicles than I would as a human driver. I also don’t trust it in high traffic/merge situations yet, but this may partly just be me - it hasn’t really made many errors in this situation yet.

I’ve been skeptical of FSDb, and still am. That said, it has served the exact purpose for which I bought it.

I use my Tesla for commuting. It’s about 65mi each way, a mix of limited access highway (currently with heavy construction), rural open access divided highway, and city streets. This use case is why I invested in FSD. It is the only driver assist package currently available (other than possible comma 3) that can handle all driving tasks in all of these conditions. Competitor’s “hands free” driver assist features require pre-mapped limited access highways, thus none of them would work for the vast majority of my commute and would be effectively useless. Likewise, adaptive cruise control with lane keep (as I have in my other vehicle) is a far cry from the functionality of FSDb, requiring constant driver input. FSDb is technically a Level 2 assist feature, but it is so much more. And this is my biggest complaint with it.

Tesla needs to do a better job with the driver monitoring system for FSDb, so long as it’s a level 2 system. The difference between FSDb and adaptive cruise control, as far as my own experience, is that FSDb effectively locks you out of driver controls, unless a significant forced override is applied to the steering wheel. This makes the torque steering wheel sensor a pain in the a**. I’ve gotten better at applying the right amount of torque to the wheel to avoid the alerts, but in a system where my steering inputs are not translated into navigational change, I spend most of time monitoring myself to stop the nags, as opposed to actually paying full attention to what the system is doing. Personally, I think a better solution would be an advanced driver monitoring system to assure you’re paying attention, and make it hands free, lowering the steering torque required to turn the system off (ie when you place your hands on the wheel). In fact, I’ve had a number of instances where the force required to knock FSDb out resulted in a significant deviation in trajectory, usually occurring when it gets closer to a truck or other vehicle than I, as a human driver, am comfortable being, or when it misjudges speed or sharpness of a turn on city streets - both less than ideal situations to have a sudden jerking steering input.

Generally, I am very happy with the system. In fact, I see it as the best safety feature I could have. My job is shift work. I frequently drive home in the middle of the night, or the morning after a night shift. I risk falling asleep while driving all the time. It is a risk of the job. FSDb is by far the best driver assist feature for a tired driver. Though I haven’t fallen asleep at the wheel (yet), I have tested the system by squinting my eyes (so it thinks I’m asleep), and it pretty rapidly starts beeping at me. I also know that it can competently manage 95% of all driving tasks, so if I do fall sleep, it will keep on doing its thing while also monitoring me to make sure I don’t fall sleep. Definitely the best setup available for such a situation I have found. My only fear, is that if I nod off, when it beeps at me, I make a sudden steering input that results in the system being turned off and me loosing control of the car. Overall, I think the benefits far outweigh this risk.

I’m not interested in discussion of the ethics of my driving case and safety circumstances, that’s a personal decision. I am, however, fascinated by the performance of FSDb in my challenging use case. Overall, I think it does a fantastic job in difficult situations. Low light. Rural roads with absolutely no high-def mapping. The biggest errors it makes are mistaking turn lanes for new lanes of travel. There are a couple places on my drive where it does this almost every time, threatening to drive me off the road into the grassy median at 65mph. I’ve gotten more confident in the system to let it get closer to making a mistake, in fact letting it get in one of the turn lanes where I knew it extended past the intersection in a sort of merge lane. It correctly slowed, then merged back over once through the intersection, not that it should have been in that lane in the first place. At another tricky spot where the turn lane ends at the top of a rise (so it can’t see what’s ahead), it tries to take the turn lane almost every time, so I’ve learned to get out of the left lane at this location to avoid the situation. It also has the obnoxious habit of traveling in the left lane of the rural, non-limited access highway. This is not how I would drive as a human driver and I’m not sure why it is programmed for this to be the default.

Overall, FSDb is pretty good at taking all driving tasks away from the driver. It does struggle in certain situations and is absolutely not ready to take unsupervised control of your vehicle, unless you’re OK with it driving you off the road at highway speeds. A better driver monitoring system in combination with high-def maps and making it hands free would be a better solution, and get it closer to full autonomy. Here’s to hoping? I’m super excited to see what v11 and single stack brings. I like the city streets version better than the NoA version; it drives more like a human driver and has much faster responses, but also seems to be more prone to rash decisions (like getting into turn lanes inappropriately). We’ll see how it does on limited access highways…

I am curious what driving situations others have found FSDb to struggle with, or if people don’t have these issues in other areas with better mapping.

Screenshot 2023-02-26 1.51.17 PM.png

Image source: Full Self-Driving Computer Installations | Tesla Support Other Europe
Image added for Blog Feed thumbnail
 
I've had FSDb since Oct'21. I haven't noticed much improvement. I only use it for straight 2 lane road, and it does that very well.

I disable FSD via the stalk upon approaching an intersection that requires any turn because it feels like Tweek from south park is making the turn
images
1676479501793.jpeg


I frequently don't use it on 4+ lane roads because it makes the most dumb lane choices possible. Personified FSD says: "A right turn is coming up in about 100 yards! Better get in the left hand lane!"

That said, it hasn't felt dangerous to me for a long time and that is an improvement. FSD tried to kill me I think 3 times in the last months of 2021
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Yeah, sharp turns are tweaky. Other observations:

- Sucks with speed bumps. Usually doesn’t recognize them and more than willing to barrel over them at full speed. Same with railroad track crossings.

- the indefinite creep. It creeps into blind intersections literally until it’s in the middle of the intersection, just go already.
 
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Mullermn

Adapting to life without USS one hour at a time
Jun 25, 2022
308
406
Uk
I don’t have FSDb but I do use NoA and regarding this:

In fact, I’ve had a number of instances where the force required to knock FSDb out resulted in a significant deviation in trajectory,

Try and train yourself to actively turn it off by flicking the stalk upwards rather than by overriding the steering, it makes for much smoother driving. Obviously doesn’t work in a rapid intervention scenario but it does for the rest of the time.

I agree that camera based attention monitoring would be far better though.
 
TLDR:

What driving conditions have you found challenging for FSDb?

- FSDb is the best driver assist package available today, but is absolutely not ready to take unsupervised control of your vehicle.
- It would work better (and possibly more safely) with a more advanced driver monitoring system and making it hands free. High def maps might improve things to allow this degree of automation also.
- It struggles with turn lanes. This is probably better in areas with better mapping, but if its market niche is its ability to work on all types of roads, they need to do a better job with this.
- It allows closer proximity to other vehicles than I would as a human driver. I also don’t trust it in high traffic/merge situations yet, but this may partly just be me - it hasn’t really made many errors in this situation yet.

I’ve been skeptical of FSDb, and still am. That said, it has served the exact purpose for which I bought it.

I use my Tesla for commuting. It’s about 65mi each way, a mix of limited access highway (currently with heavy construction), rural open access divided highway, and city streets. This use case is why I invested in FSD. It is the only driver assist package currently available (other than possible comma 3) that can handle all driving tasks in all of these conditions. Competitor’s “hands free” driver assist features require pre-mapped limited access highways, thus none of them would work for the vast majority of my commute and would be effectively useless. Likewise, adaptive cruise control with lane keep (as I have in my other vehicle) is a far cry from the functionality of FSDb, requiring constant driver input. FSDb is technically a Level 2 assist feature, but it is so much more. And this is my biggest complaint with it.

Tesla needs to do a better job with the driver monitoring system for FSDb, so long as it’s a level 2 system. The difference between FSDb and adaptive cruise control, as far as my own experience, is that FSDb effectively locks you out of driver controls, unless a significant forced override is applied to the steering wheel. This makes the torque steering wheel sensor a pain in the a**. I’ve gotten better at applying the right amount of torque to the wheel to avoid the alerts, but in a system where my steering inputs are not translated into navigational change, I spend most of time monitoring myself to stop the nags, as opposed to actually paying full attention to what the system is doing. Personally, I think a better solution would be an advanced driver monitoring system to assure you’re paying attention, and make it hands free, lowering the steering torque required to turn the system off (ie when you place your hands on the wheel). In fact, I’ve had a number of instances where the force required to knock FSDb out resulted in a significant deviation in trajectory, usually occurring when it gets closer to a truck or other vehicle than I, as a human driver, am comfortable being, or when it misjudges speed or sharpness of a turn on city streets - both less than ideal situations to have a sudden jerking steering input.

Generally, I am very happy with the system. In fact, I see it as the best safety feature I could have. My job is shift work. I frequently drive home in the middle of the night, or the morning after a night shift. I risk falling asleep while driving all the time. It is a risk of the job. FSDb is by far the best driver assist feature for a tired driver. Though I haven’t fallen asleep at the wheel (yet), I have tested the system by squinting my eyes (so it thinks I’m asleep), and it pretty rapidly starts beeping at me. I also know that it can competently manage 95% of all driving tasks, so if I do fall sleep, it will keep on doing its thing while also monitoring me to make sure I don’t fall sleep. Definitely the best setup available for such a situation I have found. My only fear, is that if I nod off, when it beeps at me, I make a sudden steering input that results in the system being turned off and me loosing control of the car. Overall, I think the benefits far outweigh this risk.

I’m not interested in discussion of the ethics of my driving case and safety circumstances, that’s a personal decision. I am, however, fascinated by the performance of FSDb in my challenging use case. Overall, I think it does a fantastic job in difficult situations. Low light. Rural roads with absolutely no high-def mapping. The biggest errors it makes are mistaking turn lanes for new lanes of travel. There are a couple places on my drive where it does this almost every time, threatening to drive me off the road into the grassy median at 65mph. I’ve gotten more confident in the system to let it get closer to making a mistake, in fact letting it get in one of the turn lanes where I knew it extended past the intersection in a sort of merge lane. It correctly slowed, then merged back over once through the intersection, not that it should have been in that lane in the first place. At another tricky spot where the turn lane ends at the top of a rise (so it can’t see what’s ahead), it tries to take the turn lane almost every time, so I’ve learned to get out of the left lane at this location to avoid the situation. It also has the obnoxious habit of traveling in the left lane of the rural, non-limited access highway. This is not how I would drive as a human driver and I’m not sure why it is programmed for this to be the default.

Overall, FSDb is pretty good at taking all driving tasks away from the driver. It does struggle in certain situations and is absolutely not ready to take unsupervised control of your vehicle, unless you’re OK with it driving you off the road at highway speeds. A better driver monitoring system in combination with high-def maps and making it hands free would be a better solution, and get it closer to full autonomy. Here’s to hoping? I’m super excited to see what v11 and single stack brings. I like the city streets version better than the NoA version; it drives more like a human driver and has much faster responses, but also seems to be more prone to rash decisions (like getting into turn lanes inappropriately). We’ll see how it does on limited access highways…

I am curious what driving situations others have found FSDb to struggle with, or if people don’t have these issues in other areas with better mapping.

View attachment 911961
Image source: Full Self-Driving Computer Installations | Tesla Support Other Europe
Image added for Blog Feed thumbnail
Thank yo so much for sharing your experience. Based on your experience and description I am not sure how this helps protect you if you dose off. I find that it is more work to use the AP than to just drive. Perhaps the extra work required keeps one alert. :)

At least for my 2023MYP it requires constant love. Not just looking ahead but also constant "torque" on the steering wheel....to the point where I am almost driving it myself anyhow to keep it happy. Add to that the major mistakes its capable of, I personally just dont see why anyone would pay Tesla 15000 for the FSD....or even the 6000. It should be a free option since its still "Beta" and not functional to any acceptable safety level. Anyhow I am wanting really hard to be convinced to keep the FSD past a trial rental period (200/month) but even though I also commute for 40mins each way mostly freeway, I find it annoying to use and it has done some stupid stuff. One annoying thing not mentioned here is that if someone gets in front of me the car will appropriately slow down however once/if that vehicle accelerated far way from me, the Tesla takes FooooorEveeer to accelerate back up to the original cruise speed. To the point where I am pressing the gas to climb back up the 10/15 miles per hour lost.
 
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For me it works really well on my 2018 MX, better than any other system that I have been exposed to. That being said here are my thoughts. I also wish I had the ability to help it "learn" through some sort of a feedback mechanism.

  • Roundabouts are a real challenge. It seems scared or confused, similar to how my grandma acted the first time she encountered one, but at least grandma got better with them over time. MX will not follow the correct lane, stutter to enter, and overall just spazz out. I notice it works a little better with older ones that have better mapping.
  • County Roads with no lane divider. MX will use the whole road and not just its own lane.
  • There are some areas where the MX will just brake for no real reason. It's consistent, my guess is it thinks it is coming to a stop sign or something that isn't really there.
  • Sometimes it seem way too hesitant to pull into an intersection and just needs to go.
  • Now, on the highway, it does a great job and seems to make really good decisions.
 
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EVNow

Well-Known Member
Sep 5, 2009
16,786
42,382
Seattle, WA
- FSDb is the best driver assist package available today, but is absolutely not ready to take unsupervised control of your vehicle.
- It would work better (and possibly more safely) with a more advanced driver monitoring system and making it hands free.
The above two points are not compatible. You got to have your hands on the wheel to be able to take over control in an instant.

What is correct though is if Tesla actually can figure out whether your hands are on the wheel without you needing to provide some torque.
 
TLDR:

What driving conditions have you found challenging for FSDb?

- FSDb is the best driver assist package available today, but is absolutely not ready to take unsupervised control of your vehicle.
- It would work better (and possibly more safely) with a more advanced driver monitoring system and making it hands free. High def maps might improve things to allow this degree of automation also.
- It struggles with turn lanes. This is probably better in areas with better mapping, but if its market niche is its ability to work on all types of roads, they need to do a better job with this.
- It allows closer proximity to other vehicles than I would as a human driver. I also don’t trust it in high traffic/merge situations yet, but this may partly just be me - it hasn’t really made many errors in this situation yet.

I’ve been skeptical of FSDb, and still am. That said, it has served the exact purpose for which I bought it.

I use my Tesla for commuting. It’s about 65mi each way, a mix of limited access highway (currently with heavy construction), rural open access divided highway, and city streets. This use case is why I invested in FSD. It is the only driver assist package currently available (other than possible comma 3) that can handle all driving tasks in all of these conditions. Competitor’s “hands free” driver assist features require pre-mapped limited access highways, thus none of them would work for the vast majority of my commute and would be effectively useless. Likewise, adaptive cruise control with lane keep (as I have in my other vehicle) is a far cry from the functionality of FSDb, requiring constant driver input. FSDb is technically a Level 2 assist feature, but it is so much more. And this is my biggest complaint with it.

Tesla needs to do a better job with the driver monitoring system for FSDb, so long as it’s a level 2 system. The difference between FSDb and adaptive cruise control, as far as my own experience, is that FSDb effectively locks you out of driver controls, unless a significant forced override is applied to the steering wheel. This makes the torque steering wheel sensor a pain in the a**. I’ve gotten better at applying the right amount of torque to the wheel to avoid the alerts, but in a system where my steering inputs are not translated into navigational change, I spend most of time monitoring myself to stop the nags, as opposed to actually paying full attention to what the system is doing. Personally, I think a better solution would be an advanced driver monitoring system to assure you’re paying attention, and make it hands free, lowering the steering torque required to turn the system off (ie when you place your hands on the wheel). In fact, I’ve had a number of instances where the force required to knock FSDb out resulted in a significant deviation in trajectory, usually occurring when it gets closer to a truck or other vehicle than I, as a human driver, am comfortable being, or when it misjudges speed or sharpness of a turn on city streets - both less than ideal situations to have a sudden jerking steering input.

Generally, I am very happy with the system. In fact, I see it as the best safety feature I could have. My job is shift work. I frequently drive home in the middle of the night, or the morning after a night shift. I risk falling asleep while driving all the time. It is a risk of the job. FSDb is by far the best driver assist feature for a tired driver. Though I haven’t fallen asleep at the wheel (yet), I have tested the system by squinting my eyes (so it thinks I’m asleep), and it pretty rapidly starts beeping at me. I also know that it can competently manage 95% of all driving tasks, so if I do fall sleep, it will keep on doing its thing while also monitoring me to make sure I don’t fall sleep. Definitely the best setup available for such a situation I have found. My only fear, is that if I nod off, when it beeps at me, I make a sudden steering input that results in the system being turned off and me loosing control of the car. Overall, I think the benefits far outweigh this risk.

I’m not interested in discussion of the ethics of my driving case and safety circumstances, that’s a personal decision. I am, however, fascinated by the performance of FSDb in my challenging use case. Overall, I think it does a fantastic job in difficult situations. Low light. Rural roads with absolutely no high-def mapping. The biggest errors it makes are mistaking turn lanes for new lanes of travel. There are a couple places on my drive where it does this almost every time, threatening to drive me off the road into the grassy median at 65mph. I’ve gotten more confident in the system to let it get closer to making a mistake, in fact letting it get in one of the turn lanes where I knew it extended past the intersection in a sort of merge lane. It correctly slowed, then merged back over once through the intersection, not that it should have been in that lane in the first place. At another tricky spot where the turn lane ends at the top of a rise (so it can’t see what’s ahead), it tries to take the turn lane almost every time, so I’ve learned to get out of the left lane at this location to avoid the situation. It also has the obnoxious habit of traveling in the left lane of the rural, non-limited access highway. This is not how I would drive as a human driver and I’m not sure why it is programmed for this to be the default.

Overall, FSDb is pretty good at taking all driving tasks away from the driver. It does struggle in certain situations and is absolutely not ready to take unsupervised control of your vehicle, unless you’re OK with it driving you off the road at highway speeds. A better driver monitoring system in combination with high-def maps and making it hands free would be a better solution, and get it closer to full autonomy. Here’s to hoping? I’m super excited to see what v11 and single stack brings. I like the city streets version better than the NoA version; it drives more like a human driver and has much faster responses, but also seems to be more prone to rash decisions (like getting into turn lanes inappropriately). We’ll see how it does on limited access highways…

I am curious what driving situations others have found FSDb to struggle with, or if people don’t have these issues in other areas with better mapping.

View attachment 911961
Image source: Full Self-Driving Computer Installations | Tesla Support Other Europe
Image added for Blog Feed thumbnail
Surprisingly, I've found FSD to work beautifully through roundabouts. There is a limit of 5 roundabouts in a row so far, based on one experience. Yesterday I had an issue on Camino del Rio S where FSD sought to lane change over a solid white line.
I am having problems with navigation. If I choose to take an alternate route, FSD will first direct me to turn around. It seems lagging to catch up and reroute.
 
I've had FSDb since Oct'21. I haven't noticed much improvement. I only use it for straight 2 lane road, and it does that very well.

I disable FSD via the stalk upon approaching an intersection that requires any turn because it feels like Tweek from south park is making the turn
images
View attachment 907488

I frequently don't use it on 4+ lane roads because it makes the most dumb lane choices possible. Personified FSD says: "A right turn is coming up in about 100 yards! Better get in the left hand lane!"

That said, it hasn't felt dangerous to me for a long time and that is an improvement. FSD tried to kill me I think 3 times in the last months of 2021
Ha ha!
 
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Good thread. I'm just playing with FSD, but find it can generally take me home from the grocery store / strip mall about 6 miles from edge of town to my rural home. In general it drives like my teen did the first few times - very cautiously and by-the-book. So I'm mainly just seeing what it can do, but it's not useful at all yet, other than NoA on long highway drives. A few things mine can't do yet:
- doesn't recognize painted speed bumps or pot holes
- doesn't recognize a stopped school bus w/ flashing lights
- will navigate unmarked neighborhood roads, but stays in the middle and gives up if a car is coming the other way
- stops in my cul-d-sac and won't go up my driveway
- Can't engage FSD from a parking space (like you would expect it to do for summon). You have to start driving first.
- doesn't stop where it should in parking lot intersections. if there's no stop sign at the end of a row it just goes.
- squares off turns too much
- gets confused and gives up in round-abouts
- hugs the yellow line too closely on right hand sweepers - scary when a car is coming the other way. It's worse if speed is set above the speed limit
- doesn't recognize slower speed limit signs on tight curves
- map is sometimes glitchy - a few spots on my local 55 mph 2 lane road the car thinks the speed changes to 25 mph, and it hits the brakes, then speeds up again a few hundred yards later. then the next week it's all 55 mph and drives fine
 
Still thoroughly disappointed with FSD after having paid for it in 2021. I figured it was 6 months to a year out, but at this point, I don't know if it will ever achieve its promised state (Full Self Driving).

I do use it on short and long stints, and when compared to adaptive cruise control, it's far and away better. But it's still not Full Self Driving. It still can't do intersections well consistantly. The acid test is simply watching other cars react to you - they don't understand the car's movements. And the car still does weird things, like oddly trying to make a left hand turn, into oncoming traffic, at 75 mph, for no reason (same point in the road, every time, on Hwy 183 in South Texas).

I'd value it at approximately $3000.00 in it's current state. It's about $1000 to $1500 better than collision-avoidance cruise control with lane keeping.
 
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Thank yo so much for sharing your experience. Based on your experience and description I am not sure how this helps protect you if you dose off. I find that it is more work to use the AP than to just drive. Perhaps the extra work required keeps one alert. :)

At least for my 2023MYP it requires constant love. Not just looking ahead but also constant "torque" on the steering wheel....to the point where I am almost driving it myself anyhow to keep it happy. Add to that the major mistakes its capable of, I personally just dont see why anyone would pay Tesla 15000 for the FSD....or even the 6000. It should be a free option since it’s still "Beta" and not functional to any acceptable safety level. Anyhow I am wanting really hard to be convinced to keep the FSD past a trial rental period (200/month) but even though I also commute for 40mins each way mostly freeway, I find it annoying to use and it has done some stupid stuff. One annoying thing not mentioned here is that if someone gets in front of me the car will appropriately slow down however once/if that vehicle accelerated far way from me, the Tesla takes FooooorEveeer to accelerate back up to the original cruise speed. To the point where I am pressing the gas to climb back up the 10/15 miles per hour lost.
Agree, I’m too impatient and press the gas on most of these situations.
 
The above two points are not compatible. You got to have your hands on the wheel to be able to take over control in an instant.

What is correct though is if Tesla actually can figure out whether your hands are on the wheel without you needing to provide some torque.
I see your point. Other manufacturers measure pressure on the wheel, not torque. But, the issue here is what is the trigger to turn FSD off and hand back control to the driver? I’ve read about this issue a little bit and I think it’s the biggest challenge with autonomy with current technology - the transfer of control from car to driver. Most manufacturers level 2 assist features are exactly that, assist (as in my Toyota), you can easily override the car inputs and it really just gives you nudges, but obviously can’t “drive itself.” FSD, which technically has full capability to drive itself, but is still “level 2,” is a different beast. It’s really a level 3 system (full control with driver able to take over at any time), without having figured out the best handoff procedure. Some argue this is an insurmountable problem for level 3 autonomy and why we should go straight from 2>4/5. I’m not holding my breath based on the unrealized promises of FSD. That said, I still think it’s the most advanced driver assist feature out there and find I can still focus more on my book on tape than with any other kind of driver assist system.
 
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Good thread. I'm just playing with FSD, but find it can generally take me home from the grocery store / strip mall about 6 miles from edge of town to my rural home. In general it drives like my teen did the first few times - very cautiously and by-the-book. So I'm mainly just seeing what it can do, but it's not useful at all yet, other than NoA on long highway drives. A few things mine can't do yet:
- doesn't recognize painted speed bumps or pot holes
- doesn't recognize a stopped school bus w/ flashing lights
- will navigate unmarked neighborhood roads, but stays in the middle and gives up if a car is coming the other way
- stops in my cul-d-sac and won't go up my driveway
- Can't engage FSD from a parking space (like you would expect it to do for summon). You have to start driving first.
- doesn't stop where it should in parking lot intersections. if there's no stop sign at the end of a row it just goes.
- squares off turns too much
- gets confused and gives up in round-abouts
- hugs the yellow line too closely on right hand sweepers - scary when a car is coming the other way. It's worse if speed is set above the speed limit
- doesn't recognize slower speed limit signs on tight curves
- map is sometimes glitchy - a few spots on my local 55 mph 2 lane road the car thinks the speed changes to 25 mph, and it hits the brakes, then speeds up again a few hundred yards later. then the next week it's all 55 mph and drives fine
I see many of the same issues. What drives me bonkers is how it hugs the outside of curves and does not drift to the outside of the lane when passing a car that’s crowding my lane - makes me very uncomfortable. Think v11 is supposed to fix the outside of the curve thing, but I find it way too trusting of the driver in the lane next to me.

I’ve experimented with a couple round shouts and it actually seemed to do ok. I find it struggles more with blind left turns, creeps way too far out before committing to going.
 
Still thoroughly disappointed with FSD after having paid for it in 2021. I figured it was 6 months to a year out, but at this point, I don't know if it will ever achieve its promised state (Full Self Driving).

I do use it on short and long stints, and when compared to adaptive cruise control, it's far and away better. But it's still not Full Self Driving. It still can't do intersections well consistantly. The acid test is simply watching other cars react to you - they don't understand the car's movements. And the car still does weird things, like oddly trying to make a left hand turn, into oncoming traffic, at 75 mph, for no reason (same point in the road, every time, on Hwy 183 in South Texas).

I'd value it at approximately $3000.00 in it's current state. It's about $1000 to $1500 better than collision-avoidance cruise control with lane keeping.
Yeah, I take over control when in higher traffic situations because it does not behave predictably like a human would and it could easily confuse other drivers.
 
The acid test is simply watching other cars react to you - they don't understand the car's movements.

I'd value it at approximately $3000.00 in it's current state.

I actually thought about sticking one of those "new driver - please be patient" magnets on my car when FSD is engaged, except it won't stick :)

And yes I'm glad I only paid $3K for FSD. Though it's still not worth it over EAP (back then that included NoAP, autopark). But it's been fun watching the car mature over time.
 

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