Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Gets up to 17a charging and cycles back to zero

clayton006

Member
Jul 27, 2020
16
10
Columbus, OH
Got home from a small trip. Before I left I charged at home to 99% SoC ( off of my gen 3 wall connector on a 60amp fuse ) and took off. At the destination I charged off of a dryer outlet to top off 10-30 nema outlet at 24amp.
Returned home with 43% SoC and plugged in my Model 3 and it would attempt to get the amps to 17 or so, and then it would go back down to 0 and keep retrying. I have a video linked of this.

OneDrive link to charging video:
20200823_222426000_iOS.MOV

I then tried my dryer outlet ( nema 10-30 ) and it did the same thing as my wall connector.

I then drove a mile south to a Tesla destination Charger. It charged fine up to 40amp and 201v.

Came back home and plugged into the wall charger to the same behavior. Flipped the breaker on the wall charger and no luck. So I left the car plugged in for about 20 minutes and checked the app and it said it was charging at 32/48 amps. Inside the car it said low grid quality detected - and - charge rate reduced unplug and retry. So I unplugged and retried and I have all 48amps at 233v.

Not sure what may be going on. The wall connector did now show any error led’s. The last time the car did this is when my wall charger said it was overheating when it wasn’t.
 

user212_nr

Active Member
Aug 26, 2019
1,407
741
US
The wall charger overheating would cause this issue, but it is strange about the 10-30.

The latter would indicate a problem with your home's wiring.
 

user212_nr

Active Member
Aug 26, 2019
1,407
741
US
lol I think your right, they both live in the Columbus area according to their profiles!

The distance is 11.8 miles between the two cities, but he traveled only 1 mile to a destination charger which worked fine.

In addition, the linked thread is a substantially different issue, and grid fluctuations are generally not allowed over a long period of time. If they cannot maintain the grid, they will turn if off, as they did in CA.
 

clayton006

Member
Jul 27, 2020
16
10
Columbus, OH
I had the power company come out today and they found that one of my 240 legs was barely making contact with the house. The nut wasn't keeping it connected well. The tech was surprised i had power. This could have been my problem....

Strange that I didn't have any other issues in the house. When my neutral was pulled off the house I had one UPS upstairs reading 133v and would trip constantly, and the one in the basement would read 109v and would trip constantly.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,141
7,152
Boise, ID
When my neutral was pulled off the house I had one UPS upstairs reading 133v and would trip constantly, and the one in the basement would read 109v and would trip constantly.
Ah! This is a very informative example of what happens if you lose a neutral in a split phase system. Some people suggest sometimes going ahead and putting on a 14-50 outlet without the neutral if their wiring run only has three wires instead of four. Besides it just not being code compliant, this is the kind of thing that can happen if an RV plugs into that. The neutral keeps the two sides balanced. If it's not there, you can get very wild voltage swings, depending on the resistance of all of the devices plugged in on the two sides.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: lUtriaNt

camalaio

Active Member
May 28, 2019
1,483
2,087
Vernon, BC, Canada
I had the power company come out today and they found that one of my 240 legs was barely making contact with the house. The nut wasn't keeping it connected well. The tech was surprised i had power. This could have been my problem....

Strange that I didn't have any other issues in the house. When my neutral was pulled off the house I had one UPS upstairs reading 133v and would trip constantly, and the one in the basement would read 109v and would trip constantly.

Wow! This is like my "story time" post in the other thread I linked. Jeez. Glad you got that looked at quickly!

Most devices aren't especially picky about the power they're getting (somewhat by regulation, somewhat because it doesn't matter by design).
 

user212_nr

Active Member
Aug 26, 2019
1,407
741
US
I had the power company come out today and they found that one of my 240 legs was barely making contact with the house. The nut wasn't keeping it connected well.

Interesting, but not sure what you mean exactly. The wires don't need to make contact with "the house" so much as with the meter. Maybe it was a stranded wire and only a few strands were left connected.

Whatever it was, it was not supplying enough power for the Tesla, but seems to have had enough for your lights.


Strange that I didn't have any other issues in the house. When my neutral was pulled off the house I had one UPS upstairs reading 133v and would trip constantly, and the one in the basement would read 109v and would trip constantly.

It sounds like you have had these issues before. Maybe there is something that you need to do to better secure your wires.
 

clayton006

Member
Jul 27, 2020
16
10
Columbus, OH
So the nut holding the wires wasn't on tight and the wires were just leaning against the terminal for one side.

The neutral being pulled off the terminal was a few years ago. The ground settled a bit and pulled it down.

I watched him wrap the cable around and I've got plenty of cable there now. Everything looks decent now. They are coming back out next week to replace the box in the back of my yard. Its got a large crack in it and is rusted pretty bad.

When I plugged in the car to charge, and he simulated a 100 amp load, everything on the house checked out well. Voltages were very well in spec and didn't drop hardly at all.

I still have my service appointment for my car on Thursday as I'm taking my car out of state over the weekend.
 

ElectricIAC

Devil’s Advocate
Dec 31, 2019
2,221
551
DFW
Got home from a small trip. Before I left I charged at home to 99% SoC ( off of my gen 3 wall connector on a 60amp fuse ) and took off. At the destination I charged off of a dryer outlet to top off 10-30 nema outlet at 24amp.
Returned home with 43% SoC and plugged in my Model 3 and it would attempt to get the amps to 17 or so, and then it would go back down to 0 and keep retrying. I have a video linked of this.

OneDrive link to charging video:
20200823_222426000_iOS.MOV

I then tried my dryer outlet ( nema 10-30 ) and it did the same thing as my wall connector.

I then drove a mile south to a Tesla destination Charger. It charged fine up to 40amp and 201v.

Came back home and plugged into the wall charger to the same behavior. Flipped the breaker on the wall charger and no luck. So I left the car plugged in for about 20 minutes and checked the app and it said it was charging at 32/48 amps. Inside the car it said low grid quality detected - and - charge rate reduced unplug and retry. So I unplugged and retried and I have all 48amps at 233v.

Not sure what may be going on. The wall connector did now show any error led’s. The last time the car did this is when my wall charger said it was overheating when it wasn’t.
This is happening on the car's side, I think. Do a reset by way of changing your wheel config and powercycle your breaker(s) as well. Should go back to normal.
 

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top