Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Giving up on buying a Tesla because of the Supercharger situation?

vanjwilson

Member
May 12, 2021
55
59
Charlotte, NC
FWIW in theory they are putting in a 50kw charger (probably 40 is max you'll see realistically) in hendersonville you could use with an adapter.

Just got my Model Y, so I haven't had to do the supercharger dance yet, but I'm looking forward to it. ;)

I'm excited about this Hendersonville CHAdeMO station. My wife's family has a place near Hendersonville, and when we go up from Charlotte, it looks like we won't be able to make it back without always running up to Asheville to one of the superchargers there. We usually go into downtown Hendersonville for a while, so CHAdeMO would probably be fast enough.

Speaking of holes, Charlotte to Asheville on US-74 is one I would love to see filled in.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mikes_fsd

jsight

Member
Apr 5, 2018
804
609
Charleston
Just got my Model Y, so I haven't had to do the supercharger dance yet, but I'm looking forward to it. ;)

I'm excited about this Hendersonville CHAdeMO station. My wife's family has a place near Hendersonville, and when we go up from Charlotte, it looks like we won't be able to make it back without always running up to Asheville to one of the superchargers there. We usually go into downtown Hendersonville for a while, so CHAdeMO would probably be fast enough.

Speaking of holes, Charlotte to Asheville on US-74 is one I would love to see filled in.
I can see what you mean. I've been to Charlotte a few times from the Spartanburg area, and there's a similar issue there, as there are no superchargers on I85. The Charlotte ones are not always on the route. Having one on I85 near Gastonia wouldn't be perfect for your route, but would still help a lot, IMO.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mikes_fsd

SigNC

Active Member
Aug 23, 2017
1,572
1,481
NC
Just got my Model Y, so I haven't had to do the supercharger dance yet, but I'm looking forward to it. ;)

I'm excited about this Hendersonville CHAdeMO station. My wife's family has a place near Hendersonville, and when we go up from Charlotte, it looks like we won't be able to make it back without always running up to Asheville to one of the superchargers there. We usually go into downtown Hendersonville for a while, so CHAdeMO would probably be fast enough.

Speaking of holes, Charlotte to Asheville on US-74 is one I would love to see filled in.
FWIW there are are few L2 downtown hendersonville now.
 

SMAlset

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2017
9,219
10,092
SF Bay Area
….I don't need a new vehicle right now, but I'm getting antsy. If I saw a Mach E for sale on a dealer's lot, I would probably jump on it at this point. However, Ford seems to be suffering from the same production delays as everyone else, so there are none to be had unless you order and wait.
If you don’t already check out Sandy Munro’s BEV teardowns that he started doing (youtube: Munro Live) you might want to check them out since your not in a hurry to buy yet. He likes the MachE but he recently checked out its thermal system and not a fan of it, sees maintenance problems down the road.


oops just read further down the thread and saw you already bought a MachE. Info above might be helpful to others considering it.

BTW OP is this the lower end MachE or their performance model? Sandy was pretty impressed with the performance model from what I remember watching.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: outdoors

WFU03

Member
May 24, 2021
10
22
Hilton Head, SC
I like that Munro does his videos, but I don't get much out of them for two reasons.

First, and most importantly, I'm just not technical enough with my car knowledge to have any sense of whether his analysis makes sense or not. I would never tinker with my car. I pretty much buy it and drive it. If it breaks, I send it to the shop.

Second, his youtube channel is a marketing avenue for his consulting services. I'm sure he believes everything he says in the videos, but he also wants companies to pay him to improve their vehicles. Therefore, I always wonder if he might inflate the importance of issues he finds in order to drive customer or future customer demand.

The Mach-E's essentially come in two battery variants (standard and extended) and two drive types (RWD and AWD). I don't believe the trim levels (Select, Premium, etc.) would change any battery/thermal systems. Even though I wanted a RWD, my vehicle is an AWD Extended Range simply because that's what was available and the price difference wasn't that bad between the RWD and AWD.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jsight

TomServo

Active Member
Apr 10, 2014
1,606
1,059
Belleville IL
I held off taking a road trip in our 2020 Y to visit the grandkids in southern MD due to COVID and a 192-mile gap between Mt Vernon IL and Louisville KY along I-64 has caused concerns for me given our health issues. While a new V3 SC'er has been "permitted" in Haubstadt, IN for Q4, we decided our LR AWD Y can easily make that 192-mile gap regardless of temps and speeds. I've done a few "test trips of about 50 miles (at my usual 7 over posted limits, HVAC set to 72, tires to 44 psi, NO Aero covers and temps OVER 85 degrees) and based on the wh/mi recorded after those trips, I calculate my Y could easily go 240 miles on about 95% of my battery (I always try and leave a MINIMUM of 5% SoC). Winter would be worse but still doable but with extra planning and care.

So we are finally taking the road trip over the Independence Day holiday. The SC'er network is growing and getting better every day and of course, there is always the option to charge at non-Tesla chargers with the right adapter and a little patience. I'm going to borrow a friend's CHAdeMO adapter and have PluShare on my phone as a backup.
 
Last edited:

LoudMusic

Member
Jul 21, 2020
640
710
Arkansas
I held off taking a road trip in our 2020 Y to visit the grandkids in southern MD due to COVID and a 192-mile gap between Mt Vernon IL and Louisville KY along I-64 has caused concerns for me given our health issues. While a new V3 SC'er has been "permitted" in Haubstadt, IN for Q4, we decided our LR AWD Y can easily make that 192-mile gap regardless of temps and speeds. I've done a few "test trips of about 50 miles (at my usual 7 over posted limits, HVAC set to 72, tires to 44 psi, NO Aero covers and temps OVER 85 degrees) and based on the wh/mi recorded after those trips, I calculate my Y could easily go 240 miles on about 95% of my battery (I always try and leave a MINIMUM of 5% SoC). Winter would be worse but still doable but with extra planning and care.

So we are finally taking the road trip over the Independence Day holiday. The SC'er network is growing and getting better every day and of course, there is always the option to charge at non-Tesla chargers with the right adapter and a little patience. I'm going to borrow a friend's CHAdeMO adapter and have PluShare on my phone as a backup.


I strongly urge you to back off that tire pressure. I ran mine at 41 PSI for a while, and now run at 38 PSI and I see no perceivable difference in efficiency. Tires warm up a lot at high speed on the highway, especially on warm days, and can lead to failure.

You should be able to make a 192 mile leg easily if you start >90% charge.
 

jbcarioca

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Feb 3, 2015
5,765
32,406
That is not possible with elevation changes with no intermediate stop from HHI. Last time I drove up to Asheville, it was a stop in Santee then Greenville. The supercharger in Columbia is also detour on I77 and it is always full.
I have done that route numerous times. Adding a least one I26 midway between would make much of life easier. I did it in a P85D and never really had a problem but factually those of us who travelled a lot in 2014-2015 when Supercharges existed but were far apart feel a bit spoiled now. We all became used to diversions and simply ignored them because those stops made us more refreshed when we arrived.

No it is different. Were I doing Hilton Head-Hendersonville, NC regularly I would choose the Model Y over the Mach E because of the Superchargers if for no other reason. The diversions, where they exist, are modest and the stop ends out being relaxing.

Until the CCS network builds out more and becomes more reliable I would not depend on it. Sadly, the only really consistent network today is Superchargers.

Were I a Ford fanatic and a BEV fan I'd buy the Ford and allow extra time to cope with outages and connection problems. That means accepting system reliability questions, but there are myriad J1772 connections in places along the way to cope with any unforeseen outages. Once you become accustomed to driving a BEV it is suddenly acceptable to accept such disruptions.

Luckily for the Tesl crowd such inconveniences have become very rare.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MorrisonHiker

RTPEV

Active Member
Mar 21, 2016
1,037
1,209
Durham, NC
So we are finally taking the road trip over the Independence Day holiday. The SC'er network is growing and getting better every day and of course, there is always the option to charge at non-Tesla chargers with the right adapter and a little patience. I'm going to borrow a friend's CHAdeMO adapter and have PluShare on my phone as a backup.

Sounds like fun! My best recommendation is to make use of the Trip Energy graph. Pop it up every now and then to see how you are doing versus the car's initial prediction (technically you can just keep your eye on the arrival SOC estimate at the bottom of the navigation instructions, but the Trip Energy graph is a bit more visual.

Trip Energy Graph.jpg

You can see here that I'm doing really well (which is typical for me)...but if the actual (green) line starts going below the gray line, you need to start taking it easy, or considering alternatives.

And if you are an ABRP (abetterrouteplanner.com) premium subscriber, you can get this display which not only contains the same type of graph, but also some great info about the next Supercharger stop (including stall availability), and beyond (including final arrival time and SOC at your destination):
ABRP.jpg


P.S. I keep my tires at 44-45 psi as recommended by Tesla. While that certainly is higher than most people are used to, I believe the tires are designed to handle that and I've never had any problems. I can't say that I've measured the difference in efficiency in my Tesla because I've always kept the tires inflated to the recommended pressure, but in my LEAF, running with lower pressure than recommended made an absolutely huge difference, so ever since then I've kept them inflated to recommended settings. I would not recommend exceeding the pressure recommendation as some hypermilers do, but I have to believe that if Tesla recommends that pressure, the tires should be able to handle it.
 

SMAlset

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2017
9,219
10,092
SF Bay Area
I thought not keeping your tires properly inflated would cause them to wear out quicker or unevenly and thus for longevity (and safety) sake was the reason for maintaining adequate pressure.
 

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top