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GM "Supercruise" in 2017, hands free freeway driving

Discussion in 'Cars and Transportation' started by RubberToe, Sep 8, 2014.

  1. RubberToe

    RubberToe Supporting the greater good

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    Surprised no one has posted this yet. I read a story yesterday where GM apparently said they would be the "first" company to produce a car that did this, in two years. I couldn't find that same story, but here is the LA Times coverage:

    GM will introduce hands-free, foot-free driving in 2017 Cadillac - LA Times

    Do you hear that Tesla, GM is going to take the lead in autonomous freeway driving :wink:

    RT
     
  2. scottf200

    scottf200 Active Member

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    The ELR and i3 already give you foot-free driving with their ACC (adaptive cruise control). Sure with Tesla would at least do that.
     
  3. hockeythug

    hockeythug Active Member

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    From Bloomberg:

    I'm guessing that would be a full EV vehicle?
     
  4. tom66

    tom66 Member

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    Wouldn't this require every car to be compatible?
     
  5. physicsfita

    physicsfita Member

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    I've been participating in a USDOT-funded pilot study testing V2V technology for a couple of years now that involves most of the major auto manufacturers (although it was not tied in to the cruise control during the six months that I got to drive one of the test vehicles -- I just got collision-avoidance alerts).

    One of the things they have been testing are aftermarket add-ons. One of them is a passive transponder that does not interact with the driver (that's what I have in my regular car now) -- it is anticipated that when the system gets rolled out, there would be an insurance incentive to install it since it would still be less likely to get in an accident. The other system is integrated in to an aftermarket GPS that would provide re-routing information in the event of an accident, and provide collision-avoidance alerts.

    I was at the press conference when they launched the study; at that time, the US Secretary of Transportation was ducking questions about a possible rule-making to require the installation of the aftermarket systems by saying that the research was then at such an early stage that it was premature to discuss rule-makings.
     

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