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Helped a friend test driving 2018 Model S

I have a Model 3 and a friend asked me to help test drive the following 2018 Model S:


It was absolutely in perfect condition condition. There are are few items of concern.

1) Software version was pretty far behind (compared to my Model 3) and not the latest. I don't remember the version number but the screen indicated Software was ready for downloading updates.
2) The Stopping Mode was set to "Hold" but it always creeps instead of "Hold" when traffic light was red so had to apply brake pedal. Regeneration was set to Standard.
3) Couldn't activate cruise control or Auto Pilot. It has FSD so I'm not familiar with FSD. Is the procedure for Auto Pilot or cruise control different for FSD and non-FSD Model S? I press down the right stalk once for cruise control and twice for Auto Pilot. The sales person didn't know crap about Tesla since the dealer is Lexus.

Peter
 
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tm1v2

Active Member
Oct 18, 2021
2,431
2,125
USA
@topboxman I suspect the lack of full brake hold is normal. I believe Tesla only does full come-to-a-stop brake hold on cars with at least one permanent magnet motor (which every 3 and Y to date has in the rear). For Model S I believe that means only Raven (front motor) and Palladium (all motors IIRC). I think a "100D" has to be pre-Raven, I believe they switched to more Model 3-ish naming like "Dual Motor" when the Raven came out.

It's been a year since I last drove a 100D-era car though. As of a year ago, a P100DL loaner I had did NOT have full come-to-a-stop brake hold.

What any Model S should have (even the original 2012-2013 pre-autopilot cars) is traditional "hill hold" where, if you were pressing the brake pedal forcefully at a stop, it then holds the brake for you for a bit until you give it any power. However that basic hill hold won't bring the car to a full stop for you, and once you give it ANY power it'll release the brake, meaning it might not be as smooth as transition as the newer Model 3 style Hold, in my experience.

Source: I have a 2013 S P85 and a 2021 3P, and I've driven many Model S loaners over the years.
 
@topboxman I suspect the lack of full brake hold is normal. I believe Tesla only does full come-to-a-stop brake hold on cars with at least one permanent magnet motor (which every 3 and Y to date has in the rear). For Model S I believe that means only Raven (front motor) and Palladium (all motors IIRC). I think a "100D" has to be pre-Raven, I believe they switched to more Model 3-ish naming like "Dual Motor" when the Raven came out.

It's been a year since I last drove a 100D-era car though. As of a year ago, a P100DL loaner I had did NOT have full come-to-a-stop brake hold.

What any Model S should have (even the original 2012-2013 pre-autopilot cars) is traditional "hill hold" where, if you were pressing the brake pedal forcefully at a stop, it then holds the brake for you for a bit until you give it any power. However that basic hill hold won't bring the car to a full stop for you, and once you give it ANY power it'll release the brake, meaning it might not be as smooth as transition as the newer Model 3 style Hold, in my experience.

Source: I have a 2013 S P85 and a 2021 3P, and I've driven many Model S loaners over the years.
When do you think the first year Model S Hold behaves like Model 3 style Hold?

Peter
 

tm1v2

Active Member
Oct 18, 2021
2,431
2,125
USA
When do you think the first year Model S Hold behaves like Model 3 style Hold?

Peter
@topboxman I believe any Raven should. They launched in 2019 though probably not all 2019 model year are Ravens, I'm sure you know how Tesla likes to launch things mid-year whenever they're ready. E.g. the Palladium launched in 2021 but if I recall correctly they built some Ravens as 2021's before shutting down the line for the change to Palladium.

In any case look at the car's trim as reported by its computers. (Don't trust a badge of course.) If it still has the kWh style naming like 100D or P100D then I believe it's NOT a Raven (or Palladium) and it will NOT have any permanent magnet motors or full brake hold.

If it has a name like "Dual Motor" or "Long Range" or "Performance" (spelled out - not just the "P" letter!) or "Plaid" then it is a Raven or Palladium. (Palladium is the newest S with the yoke, widebody, etc.)

Also I believe Raven is when adjustable / adaptive dampers were first introduced. If it has adjustable damper settings (NOT talking about air springs / ride height), then it's a Raven (or Palladium).
 
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About sw: one of the pics show 2022.20.8 as installed version. So this is a MCU2 and indeed next update it will be back “in the game”
Can you be more specific about "back in the game"? What's special about the next update?

Overall, what do any of you think of 2018 Model S 100D? I looked at used 2019 Model S Long Range or Long Range Plus and they seemed to cost at least $10K more than 2018. The driving range don't seem to be good as compared to new models.

Thanks,
Peter
 
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