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High speed charging - a question

Discussion in 'North America' started by RichMatt, Jan 13, 2017.

  1. RichMatt

    RichMatt Member

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    I've read about high speed charging supposedly coming. OUTSTANDING !
    But, does anyone have any idea if it will be available for Tesla's made in 2016 or 2015?
     
  2. BerTX

    BerTX Active Member

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    I don't think anyone HERE knows. If they did, they probably would not say.

    Highly unlikely. My car can't take the full Supercharger rate available now, and it was built in September 2016. Can the larger battery cars built late in 2016 take it? Possible, but I don't think so.
     
  3. jsmay311

    jsmay311 Member

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    Right. Today's cells just can't handle any/much more power. (Maybe the 100kWh batteries could take a bit higher than today's max Supercharger power, but likely not by much.)

    The next-gen 350kW and 400kW chargers being talked about all get to those much-higher powers principally by increasing the maximum charger voltage up to 1000V. They are only increasing max current a little bit higher than today's Supercharger max currents. So a car with a 400V battery, such as today's Teslas, will only be able to take advantage of up to 40% (well, actually less than that due to taper) of the rated power of the next-gen 1000V chargers. That's even assuming the cells can handle that much.
     
  4. EVie'sDad

    EVie'sDad Member

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    supposedly the Tesla Model ☰ is going to be capable of handling that much power, for now though all Model S and X customers cannot, that is about 3Xs the rate of the current Tesla Superchargers. Imagine filling the entire charge in a little as 20 minutes!
     
  5. wdolson

    wdolson Supporting Member

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    The original A packs are limited to lower charge rates than the B packs and later. The existing cars will probably be limited for their lifetimes. Or at least until the battery pack is changed.
     
  6. lklundin

    lklundin Member

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    Source, please.
     
  7. EVie'sDad

    EVie'sDad Member

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    "The first stations equipped with the new 400 kW technology will be deployed this year and available to customers starting in July 2017, according to the company.

    It will work with both CCS and CHAdeMO standards and therefore, it should be compatible with most electric vehicles capable of DC fast-charging – though of course, no electric car is currently capable of taking 400 kW, but some upcoming EVs, including the Tesla Model 3 and the Porsche Mission E just to name a few, are expected to be able to handle this kind of power output.

    It will also work with electric trucks and buses."

    and

    "The total output is faster than the current best, Tesla’s Supercharger at 145 kW, and even what automakers have been calling ‘ultra fast-charging‘, which is 350 kW and coming around the end of the year for the first few stations in California and Europe."

    Chargepoint announces 400 kW charging, adds 100 miles of electric vehicle range in less than 15 minutes
     
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  8. jsmay311

    jsmay311 Member

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    I think you're making some leaps of logic there based on one likely-false statement in an article covering a 3rd-party company (Chargepoint) trying to hype their upcoming product, but with zero actual information from Tesla itself. Having read most of the news about the Model 3 and the Gigafactory's 2170 cells, I think the bolded section above is speculation based on misinterpreted tweets from Elon rather than anything real or substantive.

    Chargepoint's announcements and associated articles about their planned next-gen 400kW DC chargers discuss the maximum possible charge rates, based on 1000V and 400A. They also talk about potentially-compatible vehicles capable of working with those chargers, and their HOPE of making them compatible with Teslas. (This hasn't been confirmed yet, as Tesla's connector is proprietary and the Chargepoint CEO stated at CES that the inclusion of a Tesla connector on their display unit was for demonstration purposes only. Although I supposed a Chademo adapter could be used even if it lacks a Tesla connector.)

    The fundamental unanswered question is will the Model 3 use a battery chemistry that is revolutionarily different and drastically improved vs every other EV lithium cell being used today. If it is, then much higher charge rates in the Model 3 are possible. But I think that's highly unlikely.

    And even if those theorectical cells are used, you'd still have to more-than-double the voltage of the battery pack to take advantage of the higher charge rates. Even assuming no taper, the "400kW" chargers would only be able to put 160kW into a 400V battery (400V * 400A) because they'd max out at 400A.
     
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