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High zinc content brake rotors on the Model S?

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by ToddRLockwood, Sep 25, 2012.

  1. ToddRLockwood

    ToddRLockwood Active Member

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    As someone who's replaced numerous sets of rotors on Audi cars over the years, due to surface rust, I'm curious to know if the Model S Brembo rotors are high-zinc content rotors. In New England, a car does not have to sit long before you start getting surface corrosion on rotors. Driving the car then imbeds the iron oxide into the brake pads, and before long, you've got chattering brakes. After of years of dealing with this on several Audis, I finally upgraded to high-zinc rotors and the problem went away for good.
     
  2. timdorr

    timdorr Model S P1698 / VIN 1657

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    One thing to keep in mind is that the brakes are regenerative, so the actual pad isn't used anywhere near as much as a normal car. Wear and tear from usage should be lower because a magnetic force is used for braking instead.
     
  3. ToddRLockwood

    ToddRLockwood Active Member

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    Yes, and that's perhaps even more reason why rotor corrosion could be an issue, since the pads would not be "cleaning" them as often. It's certainly possible that Brembo may use high-zinc content rotors as a matter of course, in which case this will not be an issue.
     
  4. strider

    strider Active Member

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    Well, this is absolutely an issue on Roadsters - lack of use allows "crud" to build up over time and the brakes don't work as well as when they're clean. Some of us have moved to carbon/ceramic pads to help mitigate this and testing is ongoing. Hopefully Tesla took this into account when spec'ing the Model S brake system (they used the Lotus system in the Roadster).
     
  5. Robert.Boston

    Robert.Boston Model S VIN P01536

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  6. ToddRLockwood

    ToddRLockwood Active Member

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    I upgraded the rotors on my 2002 Audi S6 to "high-zinc" rotors. I don't recall the brand. They were only about $20 more per/rotor than Audi's OEM rotor. It completely solved the problem.

    Does anyone know who I might contact at Tesla to pass along this information?
     
  7. ToddRLockwood

    ToddRLockwood Active Member

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    GM has developed some impressive technologies, or perhaps in some cases acquired them. Another good example is GM's magneride auto-adjusting shocks.
     
  8. J in MN

    J in MN S60 P12635

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    Finally there is an explanation for why the rotors on my Volt is not showing any sign of rust or wear, even with winter salt spray, after 2 years.
     

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