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Home Charging Appliance

Discussion in 'Charging Standards and Infrastructure' started by vfx, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. vfx

    vfx Well-Known Member

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    http://evsolutions.avinc.com/products/at_home/home_charging_appliance

    HCA_low_Lrg.jpg

    Home Charging Appliance

    HCA L-2*

    FEATURES

    Featuring Level 2 charging convenience
    Integrated energy storage
    Designed to charge any standard EV or PHEV with standardized connector
    Fast setup
    No electrical permit needed
    No professional installation needed
    Anticipated full charge in 3-8 hours depending on conditions
    Charge any time without “peak demand” charges*
    Moveable unit follows you to your next residence
    Promotes less wear on power distribution grid
    Promotes a more balanced grid
    Various financing options available

    HOME CHARGING APPLIANCE SPECIFICATIONS

    Charging System: Level 2
    Connector: SAE J1772
    Input Voltage: 120VAC
    Output Power: Up to 6.6kW (at 240VAC) from battery | 1.4kW to 1.9kW (at 120VAC) when battery depleted
    Frequency: 50Hz / 60Hz
    Output Current: 30A max
     
  2. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    #2 Yggdrasill, Mar 14, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2012
    I wonder how big the battery is in that thing. Maybe 5 kWh? In which case, a 85 kWh battery would take roughly 43 hours to fully charge from the lowest level. If we assume it's 20 kWh, a 85 kWh battery would take around 37 hours.

    I can't see much market for it, in any case. Any significant battery would make it a lot more expensive than simply wiring up a beefy 240 V line.
     
  3. doug

    doug Administrator / Head Moderator

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    propane or coal?
     
  4. markwj

    markwj Moderator, Asia Pacific

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    Why?

    Surely, if the battery was big enough to make it useful, it would cost too much to make it saleable.
    And, if the battery was small enough to make it saleable, it would be too small to make a difference to a 110volt/10amp charge.
     
  5. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

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    This could work for Volts and Leafs with their smaller batteries but not a Tesla. I agree it has limited utility but could be helpful for those in a condo. I assume you would have the higher rate for the first hour and then it drops down to a normal 110 outlet.
     
  6. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    If it has the higher rate for an hour, that would be a battery of around 5 kWh. If we assume really cheap lead-acid batteries, how much would 5 kWh cost? I'm guessing at least $1000. Add in the electronics, development, marketing, profit, etc, and we're probably not looking at less than $3000. This is for a device that fully charges a Volt in about 6 hours instead of around 8.5 hours.

    What market could there be for this? How many people have a place to park their car where they can safely use this charger without worrying about it getting stolen or anything, and yet don't have the opportunity to spend those $3000 on an electrician?
     
  7. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

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    5 kwh could be as simple as 2 good sized car batteries (12 v 200 amps) which can be had for $200. So it is not that much money. I also believe that the Volt and Leaf only have 3.3 kwh charger.
     
  8. richkae

    richkae VIN587

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    Don't confuse cranking amps of a car battery with amp hours capacity. A typical car battery probably has no more than 50 amp hours, which is only 600 watt hours. I'm sure anyone with a home built EV can provide more detail.
     
  9. vfx

    vfx Well-Known Member

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    From Tesla owner at AV:

    That is a forward thinking company!
     
  10. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

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    Yes I built two EV's and there are large capacity lead acid batteries. No problem there
     
  11. markwj

    markwj Moderator, Asia Pacific

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    I'm still confused how this works. Given the size of the box, it looks like it will fit perhaps 2 or 4 regular car-battery sized lead acids.

    Assuming we need 5kWh capacity and will drain at 6.6kW, what sort of size of lead acid batteries would we need?

    Given a 23kWh battery in the EV, even 5kWh is only going to give us about an hour of charging (<25% SOC) before falling back to 120v.
     
  12. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    Volt users are OK with the base model.
    But, if you have an EV with a larger battery then you need the "range extended" version with backup generator so you avoid "charger capacity anxiety"...
    JetBarbecue.jpg
     
  13. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    The cheapest high-capacity lead acid batteries I can find run about $300-500, and you'd need three. That would work out to around $1000. I think that if you are very optimistic, the charger would cost at least $1500. That's still a high price to pay for marginal benefit.

    (If you know of any place you can buy them cheaper, I'm all ears.)
     
  14. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

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    Look at the Trojan flooded golf cart batteries. That is the cheapenormal st format and 225I amp hrs runs $125. I agree not the cheapest solution but I see places like apartments or condos where one may be limited to a 110 outlet.
     

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