TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker or making a Paypal contribution here: paypal.me/SupportTMC

Homelink Problem Solved

Discussion in 'Model S' started by RedSoxFan18, Jan 16, 2016.

  1. RedSoxFan18

    RedSoxFan18 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Messages:
    73
    Location:
    Freeport, ME
    I've been having problems programming Homelink on my model s. I followed the standard process and everything seems to work, the model s found the remote, and trained the opener. However as some others have experienced the door simply would not open after the process was completed. I tried everything on the forum to no avail. Eventually I figured it out so I'll post this year in case someone runs into the same/similar problem. My garage door openers are Genie circa 2000. I have two car garages and have a 3 button Genie remote with one button programmed for each door and a spare. Because I didn't want the door going opening and closing during the process I used the third/spare button on my remote. It turns out that the third button on my remote is only compatible with the newer Genie openers so when the Model S paired with the 3rd button on the remote it was pairing with something incompatible with the opener. I have no explanation why when I pressed the train button on the opener and the Model S when through the train process it reported success but that it what happened. In any event I guess the moral of the story is to make sure the actual button you are using to pair the remote with the model s can properly open the door.
     
  2. S3XY

    S3XY Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2015
    Messages:
    312
    Location:
    Buffalo, NY
  3. green1

    green1 Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    4,116
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Ummm.... I don't mean to sound condescending here, but how exactly did you think this was supposed to work?

    To me it seemed obvious that if you wanted to train the homelink to open a specific garage door, you'd have to press the button associated with that door to do the training.
     
  4. ArtInCT

    ArtInCT Always Learning

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2014
    Messages:
    1,607
    Location:
    Southern Connecticut
    #4 ArtInCT, Jan 16, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2016
    I am SO GLAD your id is not YANKEEFAN... jus kiddin' just kidding' Glad you got that all figured out.
    How is that red beast working otherwise?
    Having fun up there in the cold dark North? Or has your Winter been warmer too?
     
  5. RedSoxFan18

    RedSoxFan18 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Messages:
    73
    Location:
    Freeport, ME
    #5 RedSoxFan18, Jan 16, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2016
    As I understand it there is no requirement that the button on the remote is already trained with the opener. The Model S is not cloning the remote rather it is learning from the remote how to communicate with the opener. During the first part of the process - the Model S is simply listening across different frequencies to discover what frequency to use when communicating with the opener in step 2. During the second phase it communicates over that frequency and does the handshake to setup the rotating codes. If the third button on my remote was communicating on the same frequency as the other two buttons the process I used would have worked just fine.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I just confirmed - genie in fact recommends that you use a button not programmed to your opener, specifically for the reason I mentioned, so the door does not open and close throughout the process. Step 1 in their instructions:

    1.
    Choose a button on a Genie Intellicode remote* not yet programmed to youroperator.






    Of course if I had found this specific document before I started I would have seen the section with the specific instructions regarding my remote.


    http://www.geniecompany.com/data/products/accessories/homelink-system_programming.pdf
     
  6. green1

    green1 Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    4,116
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    How can it learn to open the door from a button that doesn't know how to do so?

    If you could in fact do that, it would be a giant gaping security hole in the garage door opener, where anyone could train their remote to open any garage door. By making sure that the button knows how to open the door, we allow only authorized users to get in to the garage.
     
  7. tanner

    tanner Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2013
    Messages:
    1,025
    Location:
    SoCal
    Yeah, it clones it... LOL!
     
  8. RedSoxFan18

    RedSoxFan18 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Messages:
    73
    Location:
    Freeport, ME
    No they could not. The training requires two distinct steps - the first one if for the car to discover what frequency the opener uses. So the remote teaches the Model S how to talk to the opener, but it does not teach the Model S hot to send the open signal. The Model S can learn to communicate with an opener from any remote that is compatible for that particular opener. Completely this step is necessary for Homelink to complete but it is not sufficient.

    Once this step is complete the Model S is ready to learn how to send an Open/Close signal. During the second step someone has to get up on a ladder and press the Learn/Train button on the garage door opener, then go back to the Model S and press "continue" it is during this step that the OPENER not the remote trains the Model S how to transmit the open/close signal with rotating codes. There is no gaping security hole since someone has to have access to the garage door opener for the learning to complete.
     
  9. tanner

    tanner Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2013
    Messages:
    1,025
    Location:
    SoCal
    +1 that's right, I forgot about that second step.... That's pretty much how any opener works though.
     
  10. green1

    green1 Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    4,116
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    My Tesla did not require a second step. And in your scenario, it would have no need for the first step, as the second step alone would suffice.

    There's no reason the vehicle would ever need a non-working opener involved. It either needs the working one to clone it, or the button on the garage door opener to learn the car, a non-working remote doesn't help anything.
     
  11. RedSoxFan18

    RedSoxFan18 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Messages:
    73
    Location:
    Freeport, ME
    I suspect you have an opener that does not use rolling codes. In such a situation you can in fact clone the remote, the model S simply needs to receive the signal from the remote and then transmit that exact same signal going forward.

    Many openers use rolling codes and for them the situation is more complicated. It helps to think about the setup in reverse order. For rolling code openers the opener has an "Learn" button / function. When the Learn button is pressed the opener listens for a new remote to register. The opener listens on a frequency specific to that manufacturer/model and is listening for a specific signal that includes the unique identifier of the new remote which is used to seed the rolling codes. You can think of the remote unique id like a computers MAC or IP Address. Essentially the remote is registering with the opener, the remote is not really learning anything. When the learn button is pressed the opener only listens for 30 seconds and then returns to normal operation. The new remote must transmit it's unique ID during that 30 second window or registration fails. The model S must be told which frequency to transmit its registration before the learn button is pressed because there is not enough time for the Model S to transmit the registration message across all frequencies used by the different garage door openers. This is why the process is two steps for rolling code openers.
     
  12. orlenok

    orlenok Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2015
    Messages:
    51
    Location:
    Versonnex, France
    Where did you get these 2 step pairing instructions from? I couldn't find it in the manual. I also have a rolling code opener. I haven't been able to make it work with the car.
     
  13. green1

    green1 Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    4,116
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Yes I do have a rolling code opener, however, that's actually relatively beside the point.

    If you are using the button on the garage door opener to set it, there would be no need for a remote AT ALL! an unprogrammed remote has no possible way of helping this process.

    I'm somewhat surprised that you're still arguing this point when your method physically didn't work and those that used a programmed remote have had success.
     
  14. orlenok

    orlenok Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2015
    Messages:
    51
    Location:
    Versonnex, France
    That's impossible though, isn't it? Pressing this button puts the opener in receiver mode, so you need a transmitter somewhere to make it work. Programming homelink is also receiver mode.

    The only way this could work would be to teach an unused remote code to the car and then have the opener learn it, which is a kind of convoluted way to make it work. But you still need a remote for this :smile:
     
  15. green1

    green1 Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    4,116
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Go ahead and try it is all I can say. It didn't work for the OP, it's not a solution that's documented in the manual, and it defies all common sense, but if you really think it will work, you just go ahead and try it.
     
  16. ItsNotAboutTheMoney

    ItsNotAboutTheMoney Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,502
    Location:
    Maine
    That doesn't matter. Logically you _have_ to clone at the button level.

    Just consider the case of a double garage, where two buttons on your remote open different doors. (Like ours).

    If you set up a button by cloning at the remote level, how would it know which door to open?
     
  17. orlenok

    orlenok Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2015
    Messages:
    51
    Location:
    Versonnex, France
    Why does it defy common sense? You teach an unused button to the car. Then you teach the opener to recognize that signal by pressing a learning button on the opener and transmitting the signal from the car.

    Note I am not arguing about common sense in the original post...

    For my part, my protocol (rolling code Hormann bisecur) does not seem to be compatible with homelink. I wired an additional fixed code receiver on Friday that got recognized by the car. I also did something stupid though: the receiver I bought is DC powered, and I had seen 24v terminals on the opener that I used. It turned out though that these were meant for an external light (I should have read the manual) so current does not flow there very often :) I now ordered an external power supply.
     
  18. RedSoxFan18

    RedSoxFan18 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Messages:
    73
    Location:
    Freeport, ME
    +1 I agree, my wording was poor. Anywhere I said remote I should have used remote button. Each button can transmit unique rolling codes.

    The reason, the only reason, the process I used failed is the the third button on my three button remote is not compatible with my opener. You can see that in the remote manual see bottom right of page one: http://www.geniecompany.com/data/products/accessories/manuals/3-Btn_IC2-remote_eng-fre.pdf

    Just to convince myself I was not going crazy I deleted the homelink setup from my Model S this morning, cleared all the remote settings from my opener so that no remote was functional, then used my deprogrammed remote to setup my Model S. It worked.
     

Share This Page