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Hood Panel Removal

Discussion in 'Roadster' started by smicker, Jan 16, 2015.

  1. smicker

    smicker Roadster 1020

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    Does anyone have instructions or tips on removal of the hood panels (for replacement with CF units)? It looks like the bottom ones have some sort of hard plastic gasket while the large top panel doesn't.

    The panels themselves have threaded posts but there doesn't appear to a corresponding nut on the other side, just an extrusion.

    --Paul

    IMG_0609.jpg

    IMG_0610.jpg

    IMG_0612.jpg
     
  2. wiztecy

    wiztecy Active Member

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    What does the the underside of the carbon fiber replacement look like? Pics would help us make come up with some ideas.
     
  3. hcsharp

    hcsharp Active Member

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    I've been wondering the exact same thing, for the same reason.

    At first I assumed the gaskets were double-sided adhesive pads for body attachments but it's a little too hard for that. Have you actually seen the threaded posts on the underside of the panels?
     
  4. wiztecy

    wiztecy Active Member

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    My best guess is that the support arms are possibly flame retardant, that they heat them up to melt the glue holding down the CF louvers and rear panel. Then re-apply the glue, and insert the new one. Again that's a guess. Looking at the new part will be key. I have a friend who has a damaged hood so we can play on that with heat if need be finding out what works if he gives me permission.
     
  5. AltPowr

    AltPowr Member

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    I had the exterior carbon fiber kit installed at the Tesla factory last year when I purchased my Roadster. I had no idea, but they had to have a body shop CUT the original pieces off the black frame part in your pictures above. They then bonded the new carbon fiber ones onto those same black frames. They did do a nice job and actually saved the original blue hood strips for me. The undersides were scratched up a bit from the saw blade. You would think they were pressed or bolted on, but no, they are glued on.

    I wanted to be able to go back and forth from color to carbon, but it is a permanent change. Of course all of the rest of the carbon fiber body pieces are bolt on.
     
  6. smicker

    smicker Roadster 1020

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    Thanks for the responses. Below is a picture of the post on the new CF units. The white area around the post is very rough--the resin has been scraped away, perhaps to give the glue something to bond to?

    In any event this doesn't look like a do-it-yourself job.

    IMG_0613_2.jpg
     
  7. hcsharp

    hcsharp Active Member

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    I would be foolish enough to do it myself. First I would cut the old ones off like the body shop did. A Dremel or similar with a fine saw blade to cut through the plastic, then switch to a cut-off wheel for metal to cut through the bolt. I wouldn't put the new ones on the same way. I would cut the raised extrusions off of the frame. Then thread a nut onto the end of the stud coming from the hood panel.
     
  8. shrink

    shrink Member

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    By contrast, I would pay someone to wrap it in 3M Carbon Fiber wrap instead and enjoy it for the couple
    years the wrap lasts, but, alas, Henry is far more skilled than I. :smile:
     
  9. smicker

    smicker Roadster 1020

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    #9 smicker, Jan 18, 2015
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2015
    I don't recommend anyone try this themselves--take it to a body shop. It took about 3 hours of heat gun work to get the large panel off, and I gave up trying not to scratch the paint after about ten minutes. The smaller pieces were relatively easy, coming off in just a few minutes. The large cf panel posts were off by 1/4"(!) so I had to dremel part of the support frame away so it would seat properly.

    image.jpg

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  10. wiztecy

    wiztecy Active Member

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    #10 wiztecy, Jan 18, 2015
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2015
    So how did it come off?

    Did you only heat the frame? Or up on the bottom of the CF parts? Do you have pics of the underside of your old parts? And then did you epoxy the old one on?

    Looks like a scary job to do from the pics.
     
  11. hcsharp

    hcsharp Active Member

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    Did you just heat it up and pry it off? Why was the large piece so much harder? Was it just because it had more places that it was glued?

    Thanks for posting this.
     
  12. smicker

    smicker Roadster 1020

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    Yup, appx 1000º heat from the back for a few minutes followed by lots of pulling and prying. the large unit has a 1.5" strip of glue the entire length of both braces, so it was necessary to really get in there with a steel paint scraper in order to break the initial bond at the top corner and get any kind of leverage. The louvers by comparison have much smaller mounting areas and came off quickly.

    Also, the remaining glue was impossible to remove from the frame, at least with normal household tools. I used Goop to glue the units down, we'll see if it holds well. It looks really solid this morning, but don't overdo the glue as it really seeps out. I will not be showing anyone the backside of this project...

    IMG_0631.jpg
     
  13. wiztecy

    wiztecy Active Member

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    Thanks for documenting and congrats pulling it off. Yes, see if the goop holds... not sure on the shelf life and how well it deals with being in the sun/cooled off many times. If you do find its not giving you the bond you need buy a tube of Sikaflex 252:

    Sika Sikaflex 252 Polyurethane Elastic Adhesive Caulk, 10.5 oz Cartridge, Black: Amazon.com: Industrial Scientific

    Its seriously like welding the bond is so strong. I use it on my RV and anywhere that fiberglass panels need to be bonded to any surface. Make sure to use latex gloves with it and have some olive oil around to help get it off you if you manage to do so. Also make sure you clamp down or put some heavy weight on what your bonding to get the best results.

    Sika 252 SikaFlex One Part Polyurethane Adhesive
    A high viscous, high strength adhesive, this product can replace rivets, screws, welds, and other mechanical fasteners. Seals and bonds in one step. Available in black, white, gray.
     
  14. smicker

    smicker Roadster 1020

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    I'm now getting a permanent "hood open" alert :) Does anyone know where the sensor lives?
     
  15. Lloyd

    Lloyd Active Member

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    What did your wife say about you using her iorning board as a sawhorse?? :scared:
     
  16. hcsharp

    hcsharp Active Member

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    1000º heat? That's enough to melt the epoxy that holds the carbon fiber together, and not too far below the melting point of aluminum! Surprised you didn't melt or warp the frame.
     
  17. smicker

    smicker Roadster 1020

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    One of the perks of being single :)

    That was the setting on the heat gun, I wonder if it was actually 1000º by the time it hit the frame? Also the heat was directed on the back of the frame so that much heat probably didn't reach the old panels on the front.
     
  18. smicker

    smicker Roadster 1020

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    Okay found the sensor, it's the big plunger in the middle--the wiring connector had come off.

    IMG_0634.jpg
     

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