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How Dashcam Saved Me Thousands of Dollars & Headache(partly)

It is extremely beneficial to install a dashcam not only to protect our prized possession but to protect ourselves from "what if" scenarios. Especially our EV practically can provide the power to monitor our car 24/7 compared to ICE vehicles.
In Feb 2014, I decided to gift him the dashcam after he introduced it to me the benefits of having one. Not only did it save him twice, but catching some of those "what the heck was that person thinking?" moments. IT PAYS FOR ITSELF!!

Tesla Accident 1

Tesla Accident 2

What Do You Think They Were Doing?

Random Lady Touching My Car
 

ecarfan

Well-Known Member
Moderator
It is extremely beneficial to install a dashcam not only to protect our prized possession but to protect ourselves from "what if" scenarios.
I have never owned a dash cam, but have been interested in the idea (I wish Tesla provided that capability using it's existing cameras, but as @STbreaker pointed out, they may not be optimized for that purpose). Please explain to me how any of the recordings you posted help the driver who was operating the dash cam in their car.

In the first video, I could not read the license plate of the car that appeared to hit the dash cam owner as it illegally merged into the carpool lane they were traveling in. So in that case theycould not track down the driver of that car. In any case, their insurance will cover the needed repairs.

In the second video, it appears that they were turning left across slow moving oncoming traffic and someone failed to see them and hit them at low speed. However, their dash cam was not pointing in that direction at the time of the impact so the vehicle that hit them was not recorded on camera.

The third video records an accident that they were not involved in, and the fourth video shows someone running their fingers across the hood of their car, an odd but harmless activity.

While I can imagine scenarios where a dash cam would show that the driver of the car operating the dash cam was not at fault in an accident, there will be approximately as many scenarios where the dash cam will show that the driver was at fault.

The dash cam is, on the whole, just as likely to demonstrate the driver is at fault as it is to show they are not at fault. To assume that the dash cam is always going to help the driver is to assume that the driver is never at fault in any accident scenario, which is obviously a faulty assumption.
 
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gaswalla

Model S,3,X.. CT with Austin delivery
Sep 23, 2012
4,096
5,112
San Diego
What kind of person would submit dashcam video implicating themselves.
Yes, maybe a dashcam doesn't solve all issues, but it does help. Driving a high profile car puts a target on the driver unfortunately- a dash cam helps mitigate that risk.
Of course, if you disagree, then don't get one.
 

SomeJoe7777

Marginally-Known Member
Mar 28, 2015
2,283
6,111
Houston, TX
@ecarfan,

The dashcam provides an objective, concrete record of what exactly happened. Even if license plates or the actual collision is missing from the video, other evidence is invaluable.

Information that you can infer from video 1:
  • The cammer was legally driving in his own lane.
  • The cammer did not cause the collision.
  • The collision was light, casting any claims of injuries by the other party into doubt.

Information that you can infer from video 2:
  • The cammer was making a legal left turn.
  • The cammer waited until the path was completely clear -- no oncoming vehicles were visible.
  • The other driver impacted the cammer's vehicle from the side.
  • The collision was light.

For video 3, while it provides little for the cammer, capturing other accidents can be invaluable for the police or the other party should you want to provide it to them.

In video 4, yes the activity is innocuous, but at a minimum I would check the rear area of my vehicle to make sure it wasn't scratched or keyed. If it was, I bet I know who did it.

Hypothetically, if someone was worried about the dashcam incriminating their own driving, then perhaps the dashcam isn't really the problem. :)

I have a dashcam and I feel it offers a huge amount of personal protection. It protects you against fraud and vandalism, and also forces police and insurance companies to act -- you won't get a run-around because "there is no proof". Plus, the dashcam is relatively inexpensive -- the BlackVue 650 in the original post is generally between $500-$600 professionally installed. If you look at that as a one-time insurance premium, I think it's a great deal.
 
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The first video could be extremely handy for proving fault. Without video, it'll come down to he-said-she-said and you'd have to hope the other driver admitted they crossed the line like that. They could easily claim that you merged into them rather than vice versa, and absent video, there would be no evidence to prove them wrong.

The second video is pretty dubious. I'd say the Tesla driver is more at fault there. You don't have the right of way just because someone leaves you a gap.

As far as being just as likely to demonstrate fault as non-fault, I'd say that depends on how good of a driver you are. I'm also a fairly honest person, and I'm not going to lie about what happened in a crash, so if I'm at fault that will probably come out regardless of whether there's any video. But if I'm not at fault, then the camera could be what proves my case. As long as I don't use my camera to record some blatantly illegal activity, I only see an upside.
 
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Chopr147

Active Member
Apr 3, 2016
1,948
1,470
Wantagh, NY
I have never owned a dash cam, but have been interested in the idea (I wish Tesla provided that capability using it's existing cameras, but as @STbreaker pointed out, they may not be optimized for that purpose). Please explain to me how any of the recordings you posted help the driver who was operating the dash cam in their car.

In the first video, I could not read the license plate of the car that appeared to hit the dash cam owner as it illegally merged into the carpool lane they were traveling in. So in that case theycould not track down the driver of that car. In any case, their insurance will cover the needed repairs.

In the second video, it appears that they were turning left across slow moving oncoming traffic and someone failed to see them and hit them at low speed. However, their dash cam was not pointing in that direction at the time of the impact so the vehicle that hit them was not recorded on camera.

The third video records an accident that they were not involved in, and the fourth video shows someone running their fingers across the hood of their car, an odd but harmless activity.

While I can imagine scenarios where a dash cam would show that the driver of the car operating the dash cam was not at fault in an accident, there will be approximately as many scenarios where the dash cam will show that the driver was at fault.

The dash cam is, on the whole, just as likely to demonstrate the driver is at fault as it is to show they are not at fault. To assume that the dash cam is always going to help the driver is to assume that the driver is never at fault in any accident scenario, which is obviously a faulty assumption.
I have had a dashcam for a year now on my car. I have not needed it for anything and that's a good thing. But if I was an idiot and caused an accident that dashcam would not be working :)
 

Chopr147

Active Member
Apr 3, 2016
1,948
1,470
Wantagh, NY
@ecarfan,

The dashcam provides an objective, concrete record of what exactly happened. Even if license plates or the actual collision is missing from the video, other evidence is invaluable.

Information that you can infer from video 1:
  • The cammer was legally driving in his own lane.
  • The cammer did not cause the collision.
  • The collision was light, casting any claims of injuries by the other party into doubt.

Information that you can infer from video 2:
  • The cammer was making a legal left turn.
  • The cammer waited until the path was completely clear -- no oncoming vehicles were visible.
  • The other driver impacted the cammer's vehicle from the side.
  • The collision was light.

For video 3, while it provides little for the cammer, capturing other accidents can be invaluable for the police or the other party should you want to provide it to them.

In video 4, yes the activity is innocuous, but at a minimum I would check the rear area of my vehicle to make sure it wasn't scratched or keyed. If it was, I bet I know who did it.

Hypothetically, if someone was worried about the dashcam incriminating their own driving, then perhaps the dashcam isn't really the problem. :)

I have a dashcam and I feel it offers a huge amount of personal protection. It protects you against fraud and vandalism, and also forces police and insurance companies to act -- you won't get a run-around because "there is no proof". Plus, the dashcam is relatively inexpensive -- the BlackVue 650 in the original post is generally between $500-$600 professionally installed. If you look at that as a one-time insurance premium, I think it's a great deal.
$550-600?? I paid $25 and the video is crystal clear. I just have to plug/unplug power cord. I could keep it on but I am too OCD for that :)
 

SomeJoe7777

Marginally-Known Member
Mar 28, 2015
2,283
6,111
Houston, TX
$550-600?? I paid $25 and the video is crystal clear. I just have to plug/unplug power cord. I could keep it on but I am too OCD for that :)

I'm speaking of that particular camera model only. The camera package is about $350, professional installation includes both the front and rear cameras, routing and hiding the cable wire to the rear camera (which is a pain to route to the hatch lid), and power wiring from the fuse box so that the camera has always-on power so it can record while parked.

Obviously, if you want a no-frills dashcam that only records front video, doesn't record while parked, and you don't mind a USB or power outlet wire, then there are far less expensive options.

In fact, there are a few awesome apps for the Android and iPhone smartphones that turn the phone into a dashcam. You can simply get a $30 windshield suction-cup mount and you have an "OK" dashcam. But setting your phone up to record every time you get in the car is a pain, and a permanently-installed dashcam avoids that hassle.
 

Max*

Charging
Apr 8, 2015
6,672
3,838
NoVa

I was trying to figure out whether I wanted a dashcam and how hard it would be to install so I probably looked at 25-30 different links over the past few days. I saw it briefly mentioned in a few places, but here was the easiest one to relocate: Installing the Dashcam on a 2015 MS | Tesla Motors

It also discusses how the autopilot cam might not be great for actual pictures. Again, it seemed to be purely speculation to me.
 
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