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How do you close the frunk? Have you creased it?

How do you close your frunk and have you creased it that way?

  • Another method (please explain). Damage.

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    147
I've seen a lot of discussion about closing the frunk and the dreaded crease, but nothing like a poll to give an overview of how likely each method is to cause damage. So, I made this poll. It is multi-choice so, for example, someone who damaged it with one method and changed to another method can select both.

As far as I can tell, my frunk hasn't been creased yet, even though one untrained person closed it while I was distracted by others asking questions. I've always closed it with the two-hand method as explained in the manual and Tesla's instructional video, with varying degrees of awkwardness due to the pressure required.

Edit: If your frunk was damaged by someone else and not by you, pick the 'no damage' option and feel free to post what you know about how it was damaged.
 
Last edited:
I almost always use a knee on one corner and a hand on the other, since there would be something I just got out of the frunk in the other hand, or something I am getting in the car with if I just placed something in the frunk.

At the factory the 'delivery specialist' said that the frunk needs to be closed with 2 hands, one on each side and then I used one hand in the middle. The look on his face was somewhat memorable (like WTF did I just say?) and there was no crease from this one time I did it. that is the only time I have used one hand in the middle
 

JST

Active Member
May 23, 2013
1,560
229
I tend to use all ten fingers, no palms.

One feature I'd like to see added is an electric closer on the frunk. As it is, I use it only rarely, both because of a fear of damaging it and because it's a PITA to close, especially if you are holding whatever item you just took out of it.
 
Standard two hand method. I was worried about it and also having difficulty getting it closed until one of the service techs showed me the right way. It isn't just two hands on the sides there is a quick force downward that you do with it. I think people likely damage it by trying to go too slow and be careful that it messes it up.

I agree that it is harder than it should be, but not so bad once you get the hang of it. Here is to hoping that they make it easier on new cars.
 
I used the two-handed palm base method on the edge of the frunk on either side of the latch, as instructed by my DS back in November and the old user manual. A ripple (not a strong enough edge to be a crease) in the hood was pointed out to me last week. Pretty frustrating to carefully follow instructions and still damage a multi-thousand dollar part.

Turns out last month they changed the manual to specifically instruct you not to do that anymore, and have a new recommended technique that involves pushing on the flat part further up the hood (would fall into "Another method" in this poll, I think). Thanks for telling us. :cursing:
 

gavine

Petrol Head turned EV Enthusiast
Apr 1, 2014
2,638
2,224
Philadelphia, PA
My DS (Norristown, PA) taught me to put both hands about 3ft apart on the aerodynamic bulges on the front part of hood and press there. That's how I do it and no crease yet. It sometimes takes me two tries to get it to latch, but it works and so far so good. I have opened/closed mine about 10 or 15 times so far.

Those bulges seem to be a pretty strong area of the hood, however, being so far from the latch, it does require some force.
 

liuping

Active Member
Jul 23, 2013
2,243
927
San Diego
I used the two-handed palm base method on the edge of the frunk on either side of the latch, as instructed by my DS back in November and the old user manual. A ripple (not a strong enough edge to be a crease) in the hood was pointed out to me last week. Pretty frustrating to carefully follow instructions and still damage a multi-thousand dollar part.

Turns out last month they changed the manual to specifically instruct you not to do that anymore, and have a new recommended technique that involves pushing on the flat part further up the hood (would fall into "Another method" in this poll, I think). Thanks for telling us. :cursing:
I just checked the manual on "My Dashboard", but it only shows the old way for me:
closing.JPG

Where did you find the new method? Is it only for certain VINs?
 
I just checked the manual on "My Dashboard" and it still show the old way for me:
Where did you find the new method? Is it only for certain VINs?

That's the new way. They changed it to that in June. The previous method was to use two hands on either side of the latch along the front edge of the hood (basically where the two red boxes meet).
 
My car is only two months old, but in that time I seldom used the frunk, for fear of the dreaded crease -- which has been well-reported on this Forum as having impacted hundreds and hundreds of cars.

Unfortunately, I just took my vehicle into a Service Center to repair part of the interior flooring, which was coming up, and whoever worked on the car opened and closed the frunk -- leaving a very noticeable crease. So, no matter how careful owners are, this significant design defect is likely to continue to cause problems as long as others -- kids and family, friends, valets, repair people -- get their hands on the frunk at least once.
 
Mine closes fairly easily without much pressure needed. I wonder if those getting dents have a "tighter" latch that requires more pressure?
I'm pretty sure the resistance is coming from the seal rather than the latch. If I were to guess, the reason Tesla recommends closing it with pressure to the sides rather than over the latch is to put even pressure on the seal so the sides don't get pushed up and cause a downward bend in the middle that could create the crease.
 
I use the frunk to carry take-out two the three times per week (much reduced food smell in the cabinet though a little bit could still seep through the vent). I usually close it by using my whole forearm flat against the center edge of the lid and lean my body down to close it. I don't think I creased it yet. Another benefit of using my forearm is that I won't be leaving finger prints on the hood.
 

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