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How far can you go with a flat battery in your Model S - I've just tried it!

How much can you drive after "0 km/miles left" in your Models S 85D

  • 0

    Votes: 16 53.3%
  • 20

    Votes: 14 46.7%

  • Total voters
    30

Firelake

Member
Nov 25, 2015
11
6
Denmark
What happens when you run out of power in your Tesla? Range anxiety – especially at Nordic winter time – is prevalent to all EV owners and this also includes Tesla owners. As most EV’s use battery capacities of around 20 KWh, Tesla’s generous capacity of up to 100 KWh dampens this anxiety somewhat but not entirely. And for this reason you have a tendency NOT to explore the full capacity of your battery as you have to make room for any discrepancies (traffic, delays etc.) in your calculation of your trip’s ideal power need. As nobody wants to be in the dreaded situation with ZERO power somewhere on the highway you typically add 5-10% on top of your calculated power need - just to be sure, don’t you?

Tesla encourage us to not exceed the zero power mark on our Teslas, but what exactly happens if you do? Tesla fanatic Bjørn Nyland tried this by accident in 2015 with his Model S P90 (7.x software) where he ended in the roadside with a completely depleted battery pack shortly after passing zero power and he had to be pushed(!) to nearest power outlet.
Now, on my 85D (8.0 software) I made a deliberate “run-out-of-power” test late October, 2016 to see what happens when you continue to drive when you have zero left on your dashboard - and of course to share this useful knowledge with all fellow Tesla enthusiasts.

Look into the video and see what happened…
 

thimel

Member
Feb 27, 2015
610
483
What happens when you run out of power in your Tesla? Range anxiety – especially at Nordic winter time – is prevalent to all EV owners and this also includes Tesla owners. As most EV’s use battery capacities of around 20 KWh, Tesla’s generous capacity of up to 100 KWh dampens this anxiety somewhat but not entirely. And for this reason you have a tendency NOT to explore the full capacity of your battery as you have to make room for any discrepancies (traffic, delays etc.) in your calculation of your trip’s ideal power need. As nobody wants to be in the dreaded situation with ZERO power somewhere on the highway you typically add 5-10% on top of your calculated power need - just to be sure, don’t you?

Tesla encourage us to not exceed the zero power mark on our Teslas, but what exactly happens if you do? Tesla fanatic Bjørn Nyland tried this by accident in 2015 with his Model S P90 (7.x software) where he ended in the roadside with a completely depleted battery pack shortly after passing zero power and he had to be pushed(!) to nearest power outlet.
Now, on my 85D (8.0 software) I made a deliberate “run-out-of-power” test late October, 2016 to see what happens when you continue to drive when you have zero left on your dashboard - and of course to share this useful knowledge with all fellow Tesla enthusiasts.

Look into the video and see what happened…
People have tried this before. Some manage to go many miles after range reads zero. Others don't. So, I would advise people NOT to count on extra range past zero.
It was nice to see what types of warnings the car gave. I have never been down that low to see it.
 

Saghost

Well-Known Member
Oct 9, 2013
8,224
7,088
Delaware
From what I've read, I believe it depends on a bunch of factors, including how well balanced your pack is and how well calibrated the estimator is. I certainly wouldn't assume that your experience in the video is typical or rely on those extra kilometers - we have ample evidence that some cars have on some occasions stopped right at 0.
 

LargeHamCollider

Battery cells != scalable
Jan 10, 2015
981
1,877
United States
What happens when you run out of power in your Tesla? Range anxiety – especially at Nordic winter time – is prevalent to all EV owners and this also includes Tesla owners. As most EV’s use battery capacities of around 20 KWh, Tesla’s generous capacity of up to 100 KWh dampens this anxiety somewhat but not entirely. And for this reason you have a tendency NOT to explore the full capacity of your battery as you have to make room for any discrepancies (traffic, delays etc.) in your calculation of your trip’s ideal power need. As nobody wants to be in the dreaded situation with ZERO power somewhere on the highway you typically add 5-10% on top of your calculated power need - just to be sure, don’t you?

Tesla encourage us to not exceed the zero power mark on our Teslas, but what exactly happens if you do? Tesla fanatic Bjørn Nyland tried this by accident in 2015 with his Model S P90 (7.x software) where he ended in the roadside with a completely depleted battery pack shortly after passing zero power and he had to be pushed(!) to nearest power outlet.
Now, on my 85D (8.0 software) I made a deliberate “run-out-of-power” test late October, 2016 to see what happens when you continue to drive when you have zero left on your dashboard - and of course to share this useful knowledge with all fellow Tesla enthusiasts.

Look into the video and see what happened…
I think it's awesome that you actually went and did this, but like others have said, no one should count on having an identical reserve.
 

Firelake

Member
Nov 25, 2015
11
6
Denmark
From what I've read, I believe it depends on a bunch of factors, including how well balanced your pack is and how well calibrated the estimator is. I certainly wouldn't assume that your experience in the video is typical or rely on those extra kilometers - we have ample evidence that some cars have on some occasions stopped right at 0.
It is correct that the video reflects my car with its specific characteristics that may or may not be representative. However, it also showed the warnings you receive AND the fact that the car slows down - and doesn't stop all of a sudden. This behavior may have to do with newer Teslas or software (8.0) - and is something that can guide whoever that is close to zero power. To my knowledge, I'm the first to try it out and with software 8.0.
 
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Firelake

Member
Nov 25, 2015
11
6
Denmark
From what I've read, I believe it depends on a bunch of factors, including how well balanced your pack is and how well calibrated the estimator is. I certainly wouldn't assume that your experience in the video is typical or rely on those extra kilometers - we have ample evidence that some cars have on some occasions stopped right at 0.
It is correct that the video reflects my car with its specific characteristics that may or may not be representative (but why not?). However, it also showed the warnings you receive AND the fact that the car slows down - and doesn't stop all of a sudden. This behavior may have to do with newer Teslas or software (8.0) - and is something that can guide whoever that is close to zero power. To my knowledge, I'm the first to try it out and with software 8.0.
 

Firelake

Member
Nov 25, 2015
11
6
Denmark
No one should depend on getting the same results as you did. Never ever assume you will get beyond zero.
It is correct that the video reflects my car with its specific characteristics that may or may not be representative (but why not?). However, it also showed the warnings you receive AND the fact that the car slows down - and doesn't stop all of a sudden. This behavior may have to do with newer Teslas or software (8.0) - and is something that can guide whoever that is close to zero power. To my knowledge, I'm the first to try it out and with software 8.0.
 

thefortunes

Active Member
Jun 14, 2013
1,079
1,321
Wisconsin
We've had posts like this before and as I've tried to inform people (and everyone else in this thread has also said) YOU CANNOT COUNT ON THIS.

The fact that 5 people (as of right now) think they can drive 20 mi/km after zero is dangerous.

Which of the 5 of you would like to pay my daughter's tow from when she tried to stretch 2 miles (because she had read about this magical reserve)?
 

MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
16,538
38,841
Oregon
And all it would take is one significant uphill section and you would be done for, you couldn't get enough power to make it to the top. (Or trying to pass someone and it could be game over.)
 

grichard

Member De-Luxe
Oct 2, 2015
205
67
St. Louis, MO
it also showed the warnings you receive AND the fact that the car slows down - and doesn't stop all of a sudden. This behavior may have to do with newer Teslas or software (8.0) - and is something that can guide whoever that is close to zero power. To my knowledge, I'm the first to try it out and with software 8.0.

This is a sensible point, and I'm curious if knowledgeable people are able to address it. Has anybody running 8.0 abruptly had the car shut down, without first getting that "very low" warning on the dash?
 

TexasEV

Well-Known Member
Jun 5, 2013
7,650
8,911
Austin, TX
This is irresponsible to post such a claim as meaning anything more than what happened to you once. There are numerous reports of people being stranded because they thought they could go past 0, and even a few reports of cars stopping with rated miles in the single digits, when it's very cold. The rated miles display is an estimate. Sometimes there may be a few more, sometimes a few less. DO NOT DEPEND ON DRIVING PAST 0 OR YOU MAY GET STUCK.
 

Firelake

Member
Nov 25, 2015
11
6
Denmark
This is irresponsible to post such a claim as meaning anything more than what happened to you once. There are numerous reports of people being stranded because they thought they could go past 0, and even a few reports of cars stopping with rated miles in the single digits, when it's very cold. The rated miles display is an estimate. Sometimes there may be a few more, sometimes a few less. DO NOT DEPEND ON DRIVING PAST 0 OR YOU MAY GET STUCK.
Irresponsible? Did I risk my life or anybody else? Look at my other replies - the warnings and behaviour should be expected to some degree on all cars with similar software configuration.
 

Firelake

Member
Nov 25, 2015
11
6
Denmark
This is irresponsible to post such a claim as meaning anything more than what happened to you once. There are numerous reports of people being stranded because they thought they could go past 0, and even a few reports of cars stopping with rated miles in the single digits, when it's very cold. The rated miles display is an estimate. Sometimes there may be a few more, sometimes a few less. DO NOT DEPEND ON DRIVING PAST 0 OR YOU MAY GET STUCK.
Thanks for the comment but look at my other replies.
 

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