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How fast do 70A J1772 systems charge?

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by EcoHeliGuy, Dec 16, 2012.

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  1. EcoHeliGuy

    EcoHeliGuy Member

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    #1 EcoHeliGuy, Dec 16, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 17, 2012
    Hello was searching but couldn't find any numbers. Has anyone taken note of how fast the 70A public systems work?
    I was trying to take a stab at guessing based on 80A tesla system and 50A systems but those are just guesses on polished numbers.

    also when using any non supercharger public charging station (I know this very's greatly) but what's your experience with plugging in when you have only used say 100miles, I know lots of public j1772 chargers are only 30a so what rate of charge could I see with only haven driven 100 miles.
     
  2. FlasherZ

    FlasherZ Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv

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    #2 FlasherZ, Dec 16, 2012
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2012
    It depends upon the voltage present.

    At 240v (single-phase or 240V center-tapped 3-ph delta), 70A should be about 52.5 rated miles per hour charge (16.8 kW).
    At 208v (three-phase wye, many business/industrial settings), 70A should be about 45.5 rated miles per hour charge (14.5 kW).

    (Edit: I previously listed a 277v charge rate here, but have since looked up the specs and the Model S's chargers can only handle 85-265v input, so a 277v input hot-to-neutral on a 480v 3-phase system would likely burn up the charger...)

    For anything other than superchargers, I've found that SOC has no impact to charge rate. If I plug into my home 14-50 with 235 miles rated, my last 5 miles will come just as quick as the first 5 miles.
     
  3. spleen

    spleen Active Member

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    And remember that to take advantage of the higher speed of a 70 amp J1772 charger, you would need a dual charger set up in your Tesla since with a single charger, you'd be effectively limited to 40 amp charging continuous.
     
  4. EcoHeliGuy

    EcoHeliGuy Member

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    Really? I have not noticed this on the forums. That's great information.
     
  5. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    You had to read between the lines on the Supercharger postings:) There are a few postings that say something like, "At high SOC the Supercharger didn't charge any faster than at home."
     
  6. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

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    Note I have yet to find a J-1772 above 30 amps in the wild. While I do know some are being made they are very few and far between. The EV project mandated 30 amp Level 2 charging and it seems like Blink and ChargePoint considered 30 amps a max.
     
  7. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    That's code for "We'll implement the mandate as cheaply as possible." so I wouldn't expect to see anything higher unless there is another mandate. Companies normally don't do more than is required (and less if they feel they can get away with it).
     
  8. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    We're lucky here in Canada in that the majority of the Sun Country Highway chargers (though not all) are 70A. For other networks AFAIK they are all 30A, unfortunately.
     
  9. Ceilidh

    Ceilidh Member

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    Yeah. I even confirmed this by emailing Blink Customer Service to see if they had any plans to upgrade or begin installing higher amperage stations and they told me they had absolutely no plans to increase amperage now or in the near future, for what that's worth.

    Cheers.
     
  10. seventyseven

    seventyseven Member

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    There are a few 70A stations in California at Rabobank locations along Highway 101 that you can find at Recargo.com.

    - - - Updated - - -

    How can you find Sun Country Highway locations? Is there a map or list of them somewhere?
     
  11. bonnie

    bonnie Oil is for sissies.

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    That's because those were originally Tesla HPC charging stations (for Roadsters), not under any government project.

    The connectors were swapped out (about a year ago?) so that other vehicles using J1772 could also use. A couple of Roadster owners were caught unawares, since they didn't know it had been changed and didn't have an adapter. (And another good service story of Jake/Tesla Menlo Park driving several hundred miles to bring an adapter to one of those stranded Roadster owners.)
     
  12. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    The big party at the end of the cross-country Roadster tour just got underway, which means the map should be live soon.
     
  13. CSFTN

    CSFTN Member

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    Resurrecting an old thread ... planning a trip.
    By my math, assuming I hit typical J1772, this thread means I should expect between 6.2-7.2 kW of charging power at that J1772. Meanwhile, a NEMA 15-40 should supply 9.6kW? Is that correct? Its actually better to use a 14-50 than a typical, 30 amp J1772?
     
  14. Lloyd

    Lloyd Active Member

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    Typical, yes... But there are some 70 amp J1772 EVSE's out there that will deliver 18 kW
     
  15. DataMN

    DataMN Member

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    Hello from a new Model X owner / EV traveler. A question: Why don't the web-based charging networks like plugshare, chargepoint, chargehub, etc, just add Amp number to the icons on their maps? For sure HPWC, NEMA 14-50 and J1772 need them. (Don't know if DC-CHAdeMO and DC Combo vary; no experience there.) Why even show Level I; 110v/15 or 20amp i.e. household right? With a 3-6 mph charge rate, what traveler would ever 'plan' to use them? In an emergency, they're everywhere! They just clutter the map and hide the good stuff!

    Anyway, if Amps were shown on each icon, we'd know in a glance the approx. charge rate and could quickly plan! I'm actually kind of shocked the EV community hasn't insisted on it!
     
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  16. TexasEV

    TexasEV Active Member

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    Plugshare is not a charging network. It's a crowdsourced database of charging options. The name Plugshare came from how the site started-- EV owners sharing their outlets or charging stations. You can filter the site in many ways so it only shows the options you want, but not by amps. In most places the only high amp level 2 stations are Tesla destination charging, so you might want to use Tesla's map for that.

    With regard to charging networks, ChargePoint and Blink do not offer high amp level 2 charging. They're all 30A at best.
     

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