TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker or making a Paypal contribution here: paypal.me/SupportTMC

How long have you waited for repairs?

Discussion in 'Model S: Ordering, Production, Delivery' started by GasDoc, Jul 1, 2013.

  1. GasDoc

    GasDoc Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2012
    Messages:
    774
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    I wanted to get a feel on how long people are waiting for repairs and if getting parts is a bottleneck?

    I was broadsided over a month ago and they are still waiting for parts before they can begin to put my car back together.

    On the teslamotors website, I found a person who had an accident in March and they have not received parts for his car yet. There is mention of a 100 day backlog for windshields.

    Anyone else out there waiting to get their Model S back? I appreciate that the factory is building cars as fast as they can but there really needs to be more attention placed on supporting the early adopters and keeping an inventory of spare parts for the cars that are already on the road.

    Since my accident, I've been driving a spare car that we've been holding onto for my daughter--10 year old, manual transmission, Volkswagen Jetta with 150k miles; it's just not the same. I've half a mind to rent a Model S at $600/day and present the bill to the at-fault driver who hit me.
     
  2. islandbayy

    islandbayy Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2013
    Messages:
    2,017
    Location:
    Greendale, Wisconsin
    At that price, I'll rent you my model s! When can we arrange a meeting :) (no im not joking).
     
  3. GasDoc

    GasDoc Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2012
    Messages:
    774
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    Ha! If I could get reimbursed at those rates, I'd buy a new one for my wife and rent it from her!
     
  4. scott2613

    scott2613 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2013
    Messages:
    116
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    TM has developed a training and certification program for collision repair facilities. It is very specific to the vehicle and requires costly welding, structural bench and special fixturing for the Model S. They are also very selective regarding the body shops allowed in the program. As a collision shop owner myself, I feel this is absolutely essential. The Model S is of all aluminum construction. Aluminum work must be isolated from steel repair areas to prevent contamination. By approaching the repair process in this manner they are trying to insure that repaired vehicles will be as built regarding safety, handling, fit and finish. I own a P85+. We could do minor cosmetic repair or paint work but without certification would be unable to purchase collision repair parts from TM for it. We have been invited to participate in their program, have purchased the necessary equipment and signed up for their factory training but we will have to wait our turn because they are, understandably very busy. If it's any consolation only the very best vehicle manufacturers do this. It is important. We have done aluminum work for some time, We're certified to repair the Acura NSX, but this is different.
    Marshall Autobody
    Waukesha, Wisconsin
     
  5. Cal1

    Cal1 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2013
    Messages:
    176
    Location:
    Battle Ground WA
    How is this different? It's also an all aluminum car. I own both and have had my front end damaged twice on the NSX. All of the high end shops in the Denver area seemed to indicate that aluminum cars are not that big a deal to repair now.
     
  6. Shumdit

    Shumdit Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2013
    Messages:
    873
    Location:
    SC
    Yes I am curious too as the owner of three Aluminum cars (NSX, Ferrari, and Tesla). How are they different from each other, and how would those differ from the Audis?
     
  7. Cinematechs

    Cinematechs Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2013
    Messages:
    86
    Location:
    Florida
    I think he was referring the situation being different, not the aluminum car. Tesla is still considered a new company and the process of signing on service shops to deal with an all electric vehicle from a new manufacturer is painstaking.
     
  8. montgom626

    montgom626 Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2012
    Messages:
    1,339
    Location:
    USA
    #8 montgom626, Oct 15, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2013
    My Audi A8L could only be repaired at at an AUDI certified shop, if my memory is correct.
     
  9. scott2613

    scott2613 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2013
    Messages:
    116
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Here's why they are different. Each manufacturer takes their own approach to aluminum structure. Some use a combination of materials in key areas, some, Tesla included are virtually all aluminum. There are different alloys, claddings and combinations of stamping, forging and casting. Some structures are welded, some rivited, some glued and some a combination of riveting and adhesive. Each manufacturer has strict, welding, riveting and adhesive requirements as well as very specific equipment and training requirements. That's why Tesla, Audi, BMW and others will not sell any structural repair parts to body shops unless they are trained, and on their approved programs.
    Fixing minor sheet metal damage or replacing hoods and fenders can be very similar across brands. Any damage involving the structure is a very big deal.
    And for anyone with a Tesla Model S that's been not to badly damaged recently, we are finding most parts have been shipping overnight.
     
  10. montgom626

    montgom626 Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2012
    Messages:
    1,339
    Location:
    USA

    Thank you for the post. Scott, you are in the business of repairing cars, correct? Your shop has received training to fix a Tesla, correct? So, when you post about repairing any car, you actually know what you are talking about?
     

Share This Page