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How many coolant pumps does S have?

Kalud

Active Member
May 7, 2013
1,059
290
Montreal, QC
Ingineer: In the battery loop, the resistive heater you mention, does it heat the glycol solution in that loop? Is that heater a high voltage heater?

Regarding the cabin resistive heater... Likewise is it a High Voltage unit i.e.: it is powered by the traction battery.??

Thanks Ingineer for your well informed inputs, always appreciated. The two pumps in series are for the battery, the powertrain has the single pump. You can check it with CAN data and also by part numbers here.

ArtInCT: yes 6kW from HV battery.
 

Kalud

Active Member
May 7, 2013
1,059
290
Montreal, QC
So that means there is one large radiator in the front connected to the power train, so when the battery needs cooling it goes into series mode?

Passive cooling via radiator
Active cooling via A/C Chiller

Untitled.png
 

Mike K

Member
May 15, 2013
849
833
Los Angeles
So that means there is one large radiator in the front connected to the power train, so when the battery needs cooling it goes into series mode?

During normal driving I suspect the car just runs the loops in a series to cool the battery. In that case battery coolant is running through the front mount heat exchanger, though indirectly. When the battery needs more cooling than that, there is a chiller underneath the AC compressor and it will divert coolant into that. This is why you'll hear your AC compressor racing sometimes while supercharging. I don't believe AC is used to cool the battery under normal driving as you'll get a warning on the touchscreen telling you that cabin cooling is reduced while the car uses the AC to cool the battery.
 

apacheguy

S Sig #255
Oct 21, 2012
5,084
1,245
So Cal
I don't believe AC is used to cool the battery under normal driving as you'll get a warning on the touchscreen telling you that cabin cooling is reduced while the car uses the AC to cool the battery.

I've never seen such a message. Although, when you have the AC on and using the same radiator below the front grille, doesn't the battery coolant indirectly benefit from this? In other words, is the coolant not more sufficiently cooled when AC is on compared to when it is off?
 

Mike K

Member
May 15, 2013
849
833
Los Angeles
I've never seen such a message.

This is why I think the chiller isn't used for most driving. It's just used when passive cooling isn't cutting the mustard.

Although, when you have the AC on and using the same radiator below the front grille, doesn't the battery coolant indirectly benefit from this? In other words, is the coolant not more sufficiently cooled when AC is on compared to when it is off?

No, no difference at all. The AC doesn't cool the coolant directly unless the coolant is actively being channeled into the chiller below the compressor. Without this happening there should be no affect on coolant temperature regardless of AC setting. As far as the front radiator goes, I'm not sure I'm making the connection there. The front radiator is a standard air to water unit and it's purpose is to cool the drive unit loop directly and the battery loop indirectly. The use of AC wouldn't affect temperature here.
 

tom66

Member
Dec 17, 2013
625
28
United Kingdom
I do recall one driver mentioning that under spirited driving and very high ambient temperatures that they did get a warning about AC being reduced.

- - - Updated - - -

Ingineer: In the battery loop, the resistive heater you mention, does it heat the glycol solution in that loop? Is that heater a high voltage heater?

Regarding the cabin resistive heater... Likewise is it a High Voltage unit i.e.: it is powered by the traction battery.??
Both heaters operate from the unregulated battery bus, presumably with a thermostatic system to regulate temperature (or possibly duty-cycle control)
The battery heater is 5.5kW @ 450VDC, the cabin heater is probably similar.
 

Ingineer

Electrical Engineer
Aug 8, 2012
1,507
3,699
When it's cold out and SpC'ing I can see from the Thermal screen that it uses passive cooling initially, then only engages the active cooling (chiller and A/C) when needed.

Next time I SpC, I'll take a vid of the Thermal Screen.
 

IAK78612

Member
Dec 23, 2016
40
21
Tucker GA
Every time I read this forum, I'm impressed how you guys know.

I have several salvaged car parts laying around. I'm planning on using recycling the coolant pumps for an aquarium set up. This pump has 4 pins. Anyone have access to the pin out?

Also, can't find any specs listed on the motor itself. I'm sure its 12-14 volts, but I'm unsure about the rest.

Thanks.
 

Lloyd

Well-Known Member
Jan 12, 2011
6,296
2,098
San Luis Obispo, CA
I have noticed after a recent service that my coolant pumps run for up to 8 hours after charging with HPWC on my 2013 P85 Has anyone else seen this? Supercharging maxes at 45 KW.
 

Kalud

Active Member
May 7, 2013
1,059
290
Montreal, QC
Yeah, since about 2020.8 firmware approx, its a new "feature" when charging cycle goes from constant current to constant voltage, about 80% SOC, depending on battery degradation on 85 kWh batteries.

Same for Supercharger, its rate limited now on those old batteries. Plenty of reports. Its sad and very little we can do about it, they seems to try to avoid large number of battery replacement under warranty...
 

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