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How many moving parts in a Model S

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by swisscottg, Apr 7, 2014.

  1. swisscottg

    swisscottg Member

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    #1 swisscottg, Apr 7, 2014
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2014
    Anyone know how many moving parts there are in a Model S and in equivalent ICEs like BMW 7 series, MB 500 and Porsche Panamera.

    Would be a fun trivia fact. Less to go wrong by a factor of X.

    I bet someone in TMC has good data.
     
  2. SCW-Greg

    SCW-Greg Active Member

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    Yes, would be fun to know.

    But not necessarily a factor of "X". Because you have 100 years of tested technology, where Tesla is so cutting edge, there isn't nearly as much of a track record to know actual lifespans of screens, motherboards, charging ports, inverters, etc.
     
  3. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    The biggest differences between an ICE car and a Model S is that the 17" display replaces a lot of buttons, and the EV drivetrain replaces the ICE dreivetrain. Brakes, suspension, doors, A/C etc is all pretty much unchanged.

    My guess is that you have a few hundred fewer moving parts.
     
  4. simonog

    simonog Member

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    It seems to me to depend what level of detail we want to count. I like the idea of the most detailed level: I took a simple example (hah!) to start with...

    When I think about the inside of a gearbox (having recently taken a break from IT for a few days to rebuild my 1933 Morgan gearbox which is a simple one by today's standards) I can either count the box as one moving part, or about 30 (at the level of anything rotating which can be separated and thus work loose or fail in it's own right).

    a modern box with synchromesh or worse, an automatic, must of itself put an order of magnitude increase on that.

    Do the same with engine and clutch(es) and we have a large step up again.

    as Yggdrasill says, the unpowered rolling chassis seems similar except I would count all replaced switches as (unreliable) moving parts.

    I wonder if anyone knows what the granular bill-of-materials is for a Tesla versus say a Lexus?
     
  5. Pate

    Pate Member

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  6. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

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    The Roadster has 17 moving parts. The engine only 1. The single speed gear reduction about 8. Then throw in the axles. Not much to break.
     
  7. GSP

    GSP Member

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    Thanks for the link. I did not see the power brake assist motor. The parking brake was listed as one motor, perhaps there is one motor for each parking caliper instead?

    Still only about half the 100+ motor count for a 7-series or S-class.

    GSP
     
  8. wycolo

    wycolo Active Member

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    Likely the same low number as Jay Leno's 1909 Baker Electric. Solid-State, relays, etc don't count.

    Baker-electric - 1909 -12396.jpg
    --
     
  9. zwede

    zwede 2013 P85+

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    A Tesla rep made a comment to me that the MS has "24 moving parts". No idea how that was counted though.
     
  10. bob_p

    bob_p Member

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    Did this include the driver and passengers?
     
  11. LMB

    LMB Member

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    24 seems pretty low. There are 18 just associated with the wheels and drive shafts:

    4 x (wheel shaft + 2 wheel bearings) plus 2 x (drive shaft + 2 CV joints).

    And that's not even counting brake parts.
     
  12. Pate

    Pate Member

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    I remember hearing that same number on some YouTube video about MS. I seem to remember the speaker was talking about power transmission at that point.
     
  13. joeinslw

    joeinslw New Member

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    joeinslw


    I was watching a TV show on CNBC on day and the subject was Tesla Motors, the Expert said that a Tesla Model S has only 18 moving parts, and a regular gasoline engine (ICE) car has 2000, and he continued to say that is what truly makes an electric vehicle much more efficient and valuable in the long run than a gas car because of these cars don't need the service that a gasoline car needs.

    Besides the superior long range the Tesla automobile has, and will improve as time and battery research continues to make the car improve, the absence of necessary dealer service will make an electric vehicle more reliable than a gasoline car because of fewer breakdowns, the expert concluded.

    I thought about that and said if this is all true, and it must be because every time I take my car in for service it's at least two hours and two hundred bucks, then I thought, could this be the real reason why GM built their electric vehicles, leased them to their customers, recalled them and then when they were all returned, crushed them in 1999? Hum............I guess we'll never know, but I cam't help but wonder........!

    One thing is for sure, this is the reason why we are all driving ICE cars and not electric.
     
  14. invisik

    invisik Member

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    I believe that is absolutely true. But not just the manufacturers/dealers, but third party garages and shops too. And parts distribution and sales. There's really a very large ecosystem around the ICE vehicle. The change must be gradual, but will come. (Oh did I mention big oil?)

    -m
     
  15. bluenation

    bluenation Member

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    the....Expert...
     
  16. castor

    castor Member

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    It has way more than 18 moving parts, moving part should count anything that moves and can break.

    Unless the doors, frunk, trunk are welded and the windows can't open and mirrors are manual, no brakes, the wheel doesn't turn, etc. Only there you already have more than 25 moving parts, I'm not sure what the "expert" is counting, when we make this assertions is when people laugh and Tesla lose credibility.

    Probably have couple hundred moving vs several thousand which is pretty good, however 18 moving parts isn't even credible.
     
  17. EarlyAdopter

    EarlyAdopter Active Member

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    Probably correct with regards to the drivetrain - 18 moving parts on a Tesla drivetrain, vs. 2000 in a typical ICE drivetrain.

    Agreed, there are plenty more parts that move that could break on the rest of the car, but those are a common denominator between an EV and an ICE.
     
  18. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    In the 1950s TV repairmen were common. By the mid-1960s, new tube type TVs were mostly replaced by solid state ones with only one tube. EVs shouldn't be any different.
     
  19. sandpiper

    sandpiper Active Member

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    That may be true, but even with a small number of moving parts, it will be a while before the reliability is appreciably better than with an ICE. I've only been on these forums for a few months, but anecdotally it seems to me that the MS is no more reliable than a good quality ICE car.

    It will take Tesla a while to discover all of the possible failure modes for each part of the machine, and to make them all bullet proof. I'm guessing it will take another 5 years. The ICE engineers have been working on it for 100 years, and so they've got a pretty good handle on how to make a reliable ICE - even if it is vastly more complex.

    The other thing that concerns me is that Tesla behaves a lot like a software company. All of these firmware updates are great - but each time an update is pushed, there is a risk of a serious bug. And from what I've read, these bugs sometimes cause the car to become inoperative until the software reset. That introduces a whole new dimension of potential reliability problems that simply don't exist in a conventional car. I think there may have to be some learnings required on the software QA side. Not that I advocate utilizing their processes, but in avionics systems, it's relatively rare for software to be deployed with a serious bug.
     
  20. stevej119

    stevej119 Member

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    Unless the motor in the Roadster somehow has no bearings, it has more than one moving part.
     

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