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How much value is SC for you?

How much you'd pay flat fee for free SC charging for life?

  • $0-$50

    Votes: 15 9.9%
  • $51-$100

    Votes: 4 2.6%
  • $101-$250

    Votes: 6 4.0%
  • $251-$500

    Votes: 25 16.6%
  • $501-$1000

    Votes: 45 29.8%
  • $1001-$2500

    Votes: 36 23.8%
  • $2501-$5000

    Votes: 14 9.3%
  • $5001+

    Votes: 6 4.0%

  • Total voters
    151
Assume Tesla gave you option to purchase free super charging for life when you buy your M3, what's the price you'd be willing to pay for that?

I was thinking this as I'm assuming I'll barely ever use SC, maybe couple times a year. So for me the value isn't much, but some people who commute longer it might be critical.

I think here electricity is about $0.10/kWh, so 75kWh would cost about $7.50 then, yes? And that'd give >300 miles.

So in my thinking, say I use SC 10 times a year, that'd be value up to $75 a year. Maybe if Tesla offered free SC for life for $500, I'd probably take it. More than that, not worth to me.

How much would it be worth to you?
 
Well over half my miles are from Supercharging. I'd happily pay $1500 for free Supercharging even though I'd likely save less than $400 a year in charging fees. The real benefit of free Supercharging is more the psychology of being able to take a trip without any fuel cost to consider. It is hard to put a dollar value on it but that value is quite real to some of us who have free Supercharging.

When one pays for fuel, each road trip goes though a sort of cost-benefit analysis. With free Supercharging it isn't even a consideration. Road trip miles do have a rather high cost in depreciation and tire wear but that isn't quite the same as deciding whether a trip is worth $100 in electricity costs (or twice that in gas costs). It isn't rational IME.

For someone who doesn't plan to Supercharge much, which I would guess is the majority of Model 3 buyers, the value of free Supercharging figures to be rather low. For someone without home or work charging who plans to use Superchargers as the main charge source, the value figures to be higher.
 
$2000 is what it cost when it was a purchasable line item.
Sort of. My recollection is that the $2000 also included turning on the ability to use the Superchargers, in addition to free charging. The Model 3 comes with Supercharging enabled, which would seem to be of some value to many, even if charging isn't free. The question then becomes "how much of the $2000 is the enabling portion and how much is for free charging?"
 
Depends if Tesla is able to curtail hogging of the chargers for those who had paid into the SCN (Model S and X premium)

For now, people who've reached 100% have five minutes grace period. If it takes more than an hour for each car to charge to 100%, I'd rather not bother with the SCN until I'm doing any cross-country driving especially when operations management will tell us the bottleneck could be so bad if people don't vacate unless they've fully charged their vehicles.

With the way rules are being re-worked, pays to wait it out.
 

Model 3

Active Member
Jul 13, 2014
2,133
1,326
Norway
Sort of. My recollection is that the $2000 also included turning on the ability to use the Superchargers, in addition to free charging. The Model 3 comes with Supercharging enabled, which would seem to be of some value to many, even if charging isn't free. The question then becomes "how much of the $2000 is the enabling portion and how much is for free charging?"
Yes, that is right. I would definitely paid $2k to get access to the SuC network - free unlimited or other ways. But just to pre-pay SuC use? Not much.

And this is why:
Whatever price they pick, people will do the math and only buy it if it saves them money. Then they turn into hogs to make sure they get value.
:)
 

TaoJones

Beyond Driven
Nov 10, 2014
3,064
3,030
The Americas
My SC usage, annualized to include both distance travel these past 3 years along with local schlepping about when not on the road, works out to approximately $250/month at the current Californicated rate of $0.20/kW.

Real world range has ranged from every bit of the 294 miles as advertised (from SC to SC during optimal conditions on the road) down to 140 miles in town (short distance (but not short time) urban commutes with HVAC).

It's that last part that will constitute a less than wholly gentile (or gentle, even) awakening for many new-to-the-party non-garaged Model 3 owners. It also tends to confound the armchair quarterbacks and fanbois/gurls who blindly and blithely quote things like the pristine magnanimosity of the once-offered 400kW/year "benefit". Further and more to the point, most garaged owners have no clue of their actual efficiency since they wake up each morning with a full charge - and more power to them, pun only partially intended.

I doubt, as is the case currently with S/X owners, that most Model 3 owners will travel anywhere near the amount that I do. The first year, it was because I was curious, the second year, to fill in the blanks missed the first year, the third year, because I could, and now, darn the luck, I still haven't run out of roads to travel or places to experience. Funny how that works when combined with a car that easily facilitates an average of 750 miles/day.

I still have a Model 3 reservation - but that reservation now comes with the decidedly glaring reservation (tip your waitstaff and try the veal - I'm here all week) that TCO for the Model 3 increases $10K over 3-5 years versus/relative to the TCO of a CPO Model S with included SCing.

Further, the longer AP2 (ma)lingers without appreciable improvement relative to AP1, the better an AP1 car looks as a bridge for the next 2-3 years. By then, we might even have HUD and mirror stalks (cameras) and a 360-degree view and an in-car wifi hotspot and glass breakage sensors (in the US) and, well, it's a long list.

There's a flipside to those who live for range and life on the road. Let's say instead that you're new to the whole EV thing, and you and/or your significant other just want a Bolt-esque experience that doesn't look like a badly-designed sneaker and that can actually leave one's local area every now and then just like a grown-up car can. Well, then for you there's the regular Model 3 (not LR, and not yet available) which will be more than perfectly adequate for in-town life and just fine for the occasional road trip. And let's face it - most people limit their road trips to a day's drive or less before they start to seriously consider flying instead.
 
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Sort of. My recollection is that the $2000 also included turning on the ability to use the Superchargers, in addition to free charging. The Model 3 comes with Supercharging enabled, which would seem to be of some value to many, even if charging isn't free. The question then becomes "how much of the $2000 is the enabling portion and how much is for free charging?"

Back in 2012, I got an email from Tesla offering to add supercharging to my order. They said that was normally $1000 for hardware and $1000 for "software configuration, enabling and testing the interface". But I think they were just BSing an explanation for why the discount they were offering me was a good deal. (They had misled us into thinking supercharging was included, then told us it was $2000, then said it would only be $1000 for those of us who were already under contract, and finally relented and made it free for contracted buyers.)
 
I'd say a thousand on the dot. Why?

1. Lack of use - I'd only use the network to go from LA -> Vegas/San Diego and back, two to three times a year. Traveling any further than that warrants a trip to the airport in my book.

2. Concerns about supercharger availability - California is Tesla central and Vegas is a very popular road trip destination for people in SoCal. A glut of Model 3's will strain the supercharger network and could lead to long lines during popular parts of the year.
 

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