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How to get your Model 3 on jack stands without any special tools

This is going to generate tons of debate. If you don't agree with what I've posted here, or think that modern cars are made of cheese, that's great. This method is not for you & feel free to move on. If you want to give this a shot, and you actually know what you're doing, go ahead. But you're obviously at your own risk, which I feel silly even pointing out, because you're taking advice from some random person on the internet.

So here it is.

The first thing I'll say is that the Model 3's jack points are absolute garbage. They're very thin aluminum, and the Dual Motor is 4K+ lbs. This tragic realization came to pass the very first time I used the dumbass "RennStand by SafeJack" jack stands that I got shortly after I bought the car. Using these immediately began severely deforming my jack points. So I don't know whether this method will damage your jack points, since mine were already messed up, thanks to a half-baked product designed by someone who didn't thoroughly test or think it through.

Anyway, the first thing you're gonna need is a set of Esco 10498 jack stands (best jack stands ever), and high-quality "puck" adapters that fit into the jack points of the Model 3. Note the pucks aren't needed under normal circumstances, but I'd say they are, here - reason being that this at least somewhat "locks" the car to the jack stand to some degree. Without this, I'd be extremely wary of the car sliding off at some point during lifting. With this, there's a positive connection between the car and the puck, and the puck and the jack stand saddle.

So without further ado... Step 1: Lift the car by one of the rear jack points - enough so that you can get a jack stand + puck adapter under the front jack point on the same side. Lower the car onto this stand & remove the jack - the rear will remain in the air:

1648176947224.jpeg



Step 2: Remove the left rear plastic spring arm cover - one 10 mm bolt. If you can't do this or don't know what I'm talking about... "take it to the shop bro." My finger is pointing on the part of the arm where you're going place the jack. Use a hockey puck or something to lift up the car by this point, just enough to get the second jack stand underneath the adjacent rear jack point.

1648177170891.png


1648177531844.png


Wow!


Step 3: This is where it gets a little dicey, so be careful. You're going to repeat the same procedure on the other side... BUT, think about it - you're basically lifting a very well-balanced & rigid square on a flat plane. So, once you start this next step, you're most likely going to start lifting the car off of one of the jack points on the other side. So there will be at least a brief moment where the car is basically "balancing" on two opposing jack points. Go slowly and pay attention. Note that this is exactly the same thing that happens when using the overpriced "RennStands," as illustrated by plenty of YouTube videos and confirmed by my own personal experience. That's the nature of this method - if you're not comfortable with it, "take it to the shop bro." I risked trying it this way, it worked, I got comfortable with it, and have proceeded to lift the car this way dozens of times without any issues. I'd even bought a QuickJack but returned it, since lifting the Tesla was the only reason I got it. Note this method is also used by racing teams & other car communities where central front/rear jack points are nonexistent.

Anyway, you're going to have to lower the car very slowly, while making sure that the opposing lift point that you "inadvertently" lifted is going back into the correct place. You can actually see a bit of that happening here - look at the light peeking through on the left rear jack point between the pad & jack stand:

1648178375342.png



Step 4: See Step 2.

1648178483932.png



Step 5: Complain on the internet.

1648178542364.png


Happy wrenching.


(And a shameless plug: I'm selling the Forgestar wheels & Eibach sway bars (version 2) pictured on this car - see my sig. Feel free to PM me if you're in the Seattle area, I'm willing to do a *bit* of driving to make it happen.)
 
Last edited:

afadeev

Member
Feb 28, 2019
995
1,221
NYC
The above approach absolutely will work.
One suggestion - when lifting the second side of the car, to reduce the instability, use a 2" 2x4 instead of the hockey puck. Serves the same role, but also doubles as a stabilizing "shelf" to reduce "balancing" effect.

One alternative that I switched to a few years ago: Quickjack Portable Car Lift
I realize that it may not be for everyone, but man, it sure makes it easy (and less exciting) to wrench on the underside of all of your cars, including the Tesla:
 
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The above approach absolutely will work.
One suggestion - when lifting the second side of the car, to reduce the instability, use a 2" 2x4 instead of the hockey puck. Serves the same role, but also doubles as a stabilizing "shelf" to reduce "balancing" effect.

One alternative that I switched to a few years ago: Quickjack Portable Car Lift
I realize that it may not be for everyone, but man, it sure makes it easy (and less exciting) to wrench on the underside of all of your cars, including the Tesla:

Also driving onto a couple pieces of wood, just on the second side should reduce instability
 
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I would like to know why there was an issue using the RennStands? I have a similar product and it works fine. No damage to my car
after using it a few times. If you use the correct attachment for the top of the jack stand and use the rubber puck on top of it, not sure how your car could have been damaged?
 
I would like to know why there was an issue using the RennStands? I have a similar product and it works fine. No damage to my car
after using it a few times. If you use the correct attachment for the top of the jack stand and use the rubber puck on top of it, not sure how your car could have been damaged?
Post some photos of your jack points.
 

afadeev

Member
Feb 28, 2019
995
1,221
NYC
I'm replacing all four tires, so it would be nice to have all 4 wheels up. I only have two of the special jackstands, so I'm doing two wheels at a time.
2 wheels at a time (on one side) with single jacking point is still the fastest way to swap wheels.

However, there are also times when you need to lift either the front or rear axles, or lift the entire car in the air. And for those use cases, lifting the entire car and safely resting it on jack stands is the way to go.
 
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I'm waiting for my second set of wheels to get new tires on them right now. I don't like the idea of jacking up the M3 from just one jackpoint. I'm worried that body flex could break the glass roof. I have read multiple reports of roofs cracking. No one seems quite sure how their roof cracked, but it happens. I used jack stands to hold up the car. Takes a little longer, but keeps my previous car safe.

BTW I carefully examined the jack point after using the Rennstand type jack stand I have and it was still perfect. I have no idea how the original poster damaged their jack points with one of those type of jack stands if they used the puck adapter.
 

afadeev

Member
Feb 28, 2019
995
1,221
NYC
I'm waiting for my second set of wheels to get new tires on them right now. I don't like the idea of jacking up the M3 from just one jackpoint. I'm worried that body flex could break the glass roof. I have read multiple reports of roofs cracking. No one seems quite sure how their roof cracked, but it happens. I used jack stands to hold up the car. Takes a little longer, but keeps my previous car safe.

Ahem, but how exactly do you plan to get your car onto the jack stands, without lifting it one jack point at a time?
Unless you have a lift in your garage, of course. In which case, the discussion about jack stands is superfluous.

BTW, if a car is not stiff enough to withstand getting raised by the factory-built jack stands, it's is either a pre-WWI antique, or a total engineering piss of sh*t that deserves to be totaled.

Have fun either way!
 
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I'm waiting for my second set of wheels to get new tires on them right now. I don't like the idea of jacking up the M3 from just one jackpoint. I'm worried that body flex could break the glass roof. I have read multiple reports of roofs cracking. No one seems quite sure how their roof cracked, but it happens. I used jack stands to hold up the car. Takes a little longer, but keeps my previous car safe.

BTW I carefully examined the jack point after using the Rennstand type jack stand I have and it was still perfect. I have no idea how the original poster damaged their jack points with one of those type of jack stands if they used the puck adapter.
Post pics of them.

Ahem, but how exactly do you plan to get your car onto the jack stands, without lifting it one jack point at a time?
Unless you have a lift in your garage, of course. In which case, the discussion about jack stands is superfluous.

BTW, if a car is not stiff enough to withstand getting raised by the factory-built jack stands, it's is either a pre-WWI antique, or a total engineering piss of sh*t that deserves to be totaled.

Have fun either way!

Yeah, the chassis is torqued more every time you go up a driveway that causes one wheel to lift that it ever could be by single point jacking.
This.
 
Ahem, but how exactly do you plan to get your car onto the jack stands, without lifting it one jack point at a time?
Unless you have a lift in your garage, of course. In which case, the discussion about jack stands is superfluous.

BTW, if a car is not stiff enough to withstand getting raised by the factory-built jack stands, it's is either a pre-WWI antique, or a total engineering piss of sh*t that deserves to be totaled.

Have fun either way!
Do some searches on this forum about stress fractures in the M3's roof. Look up RemmStands too and then you will understand how to get the car up on jack stands. As for Dolemite, you refuse to explain how you managed to damage your jack points, so no picts. It seems like you like to bad mouth the RemmStands, but have nothing to back it up. Well, there are a number of other people on here that think the opposite about jacking the car up on just one jack point. Call Tesla and see what they say about it. Tesla recommends jacking both jack points on one side at the same time or use a lift.
 

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