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How will Tesla's semi truck impact the grid

Discussion in 'Energy, Environment, and Policy' started by AMPd, May 1, 2017.

  1. AMPd

    AMPd Active Member

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    In California, during hot summers we often get alerts from utilities asking to reduce electricity usage

    With electric cars you can charge at night and everything will be ok, but what if Tesla's semi is extremely popular with large fleets.
    They can't put off charging or only charge at certain times, they charge when they need to.

    Are we looking to a future of brownouts?
     
  2. SabrToothSqrl

    SabrToothSqrl Active Member

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    Even if they started building 100 a day, today, they would grow slow enough to allow the grid to catch up.

    Plus, if you cover the trailer in solar panels... you can offset the semi's HVAC system lol.
     
  3. AMPd

    AMPd Active Member

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    I wonder if that would be enough solar to power the refrigerated trailers!

    Good point on the ramp up of production.
    I assumed it'll ramp up as quick as the model X did.

    I hope utilities install more battery storage.
     
  4. David99

    David99 Active Member

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    Solar is already the second largest energy industry after petroleum/oil. It's bigger than coal, natural gas, wind, hydro, ... Solar produces the most when hot California needs the most. Over the last 14 years that I have been in California, I have seen a massive increase in solar installations. The trend continues. I'm not worried at all about the energy nor grid when it comes to EVs.
     
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  5. nwdiver

    nwdiver Active Member

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    More than enough... and then some.... solar might actually makes sense on a semi-truck trailer. The standard size is ~8'x53'. That's 424 sq ft. That could accommodate a ~7kW solar array. In decent weather that's ~20kWh/day. Should be enough for a refrigerated trailer or at least dramatically reduce the fuel consumed or the life of the battery...
     
  6. BluestarE3

    BluestarE3 Active Member

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    There has been some conjecture that the Semi may use battery swap. Indeed, it makes more sense to have battery swapping stations geared toward long-haul trucks on fixed/common routes and where saving on refueling time is literally saving money. In such a scenario, the swapped out battery packs could be recharged at the stations during off-peak hours or more slowly to minimize huge demand spikes.
     
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  7. SabrToothSqrl

    SabrToothSqrl Active Member

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    a semi is 8' 6" wide. max legal width (most states). so... you gain 53' x 6" from your calculation :)

    not to mention one could use at least the sides as well. they are 53' long and 10'? tall.
     
  8. kort677

    kort677 Active Member

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    you are conflating the truck unit with the trailer unit. trailers can be up to 53' long and the tractor part is between 15' and 23' long.
     
  9. SabrToothSqrl

    SabrToothSqrl Active Member

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    Not at all. I plan to cover the trailer with panels. larger surface area, and there are already cables connecting the two.
     
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  10. kort677

    kort677 Active Member

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    I don't think that you have a good grasp on how the trucking business works.
    there are 2 separate units, hence the term SEMI, one unit is the tractor the other is the trailer, in most cases the tractor pulls a different trailer on each job. a good many of the trailers are just platforms for shipping containers. those containers are stacked. putting panels onto those containers makes stacking unfeasible.
     
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  11. SabrToothSqrl

    SabrToothSqrl Active Member

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    I am aware it's two units. Some trailers would have panels, some would not.
    Ones that do, would generate power. Ones that do not will not... simple.
    Said power could run the HVAC of the trailer, or it could help power the tractor, if there is enough power.
    You have the option. if UPS outfitted all trailers with panels... then all of them would have... panels.

    It's not an all or nothing scenario. It's just a way to generate power on the move. It may not even be practical. The added weight reduces shipping capacity, not to mention is it worth it? Carrying a panel around for a few watts when it takes thousands to move....

    So, let's do it. how many sq ft is a trailer, and how many can we cover with panels.
    Then, at any given time, how many will receive light?
    How much does this now weigh? What's the cost?
     
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  12. kort677

    kort677 Active Member

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    so mr BXR, exactly what part of my observation is disagreeable to you?
     

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