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HPWC - Save money and call an independant installer!

Discussion in 'Model 3: Battery & Charging' started by djplong, Apr 4, 2018.

  1. djplong

    djplong Member

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    I just ordered my HPWC today for my forthcoming Model 3.

    So I called an electrician that my wife knows to have him estimate an installation in our garage (and make sure everything I had could handle it)/

    All good news and an estimate of under $500. Much less than when I called Tesla and asked what their installations tupically cost (they said they usually keep it under $1000)
     
  2. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

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    Or do it yourself for even half of the independent
     
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  3. goto10

    goto10 Member

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    The cost can vary a lot depending on the specific circumstances of your install. "usually under $1000" is a good ballpark to give when they don't know your specific circumstances and I've seen independent jobs that were justifiably estimated at over $2000 based on the length of run, existing service capacity, etc.

    I'll be installing mine myself just next to my electrical panel at a cost of ~$50 - basically the cost of a breaker and wire.
     
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  4. RedModel3

    RedModel3 Member

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    I'm glad y'all are so handy. But please, not all situations are alike. So much depends on the service to your house, the location of the needed plug, and many other electrical requirements that I prefer to have a professional look at so that 1.) my house doesn't burn down, and 2.) I have a history of the required permits if I ever sell the house.
     
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  5. Fusion

    Fusion Member

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    You can pull permits yourself even if you hire someone or do it yourself.
     
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  6. doubleohwhat

    doubleohwhat Member

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    A lot of times even electricians won't bother with a permit on smaller jobs.

    Personally, unless I'm doing a large project, I'll "self-permit" and by that I mean if anyone ever asks I'll just be like "dunno, it was like that when I bought the place". Honestly, as long as work you do yourself is done to code, it's unlikely anyone will ever notice or ask.
     
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  7. Futuresystem

    Futuresystem Member

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    #7 Futuresystem, Apr 5, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2018
    Being an ex-electrician (and electrical engineer) myself in my former life, before I switched in the 1970’s to flying planes, such an installation could easily vary from maybe $200 to $2,000, or more.

    It could be dead easy, or a bit of a nightmare, and every house/garage is different.

    Electrical codes everywhere are different. Here in Australia, doing it yourself is both illegal, and dangerous, and could very easily mean no house insurance in the event of a problem.
    (It just happens that a house burnt down just two doors from our son’s place at 7pm last night, the fire started in the garage, seems to have started? in the car, which was an ICE, but could of course have been anything including for example LiPo batteries on charge.)
     
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  8. WileyTheMan

    WileyTheMan Peanut Gallery Member

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    I'm looking at about $2k for a 30a HPWC installation (and I bought the HPWC already), and I consider that about the going rate around here. I also got lucky because there was room on the panel for it, so no new panel and no additional power to be added by PG&E.

    I'm cool with DIY installs, but without permits, it puts yourself and others in your neighborhood in danger.
     
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  9. rhaekar

    rhaekar Member

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    The recommended installers from Tesla were charging outrageous prices. Some wanted $1000 for the install and $300 for the permit in CA. I have a really easy install too, about 20 ft of wiring from the panel to the location. The panel and wiring route is exposed in the garage.

    Called another electrician, $330 for the install, $275 for the permit. San Diego sucks sometimes.
     
  10. Moderatefan

    Moderatefan Member

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    I've got a complicated case. I got no space in the panel and 240V 40amp breaker for the electric range currently used by sauna. When I add nema 14-50 into garage, the electrician will have to add a subpanel into the basement and add breakers for range, sauna, and new 14-50 in the garage...then add about 60 feet of wire to go from basement subpanel into garage. I believe this will run me about $1,000 based on his estimate if he doesn't change his mind. He said most electricians charge around $1,500 just for the subpanel. I might add HPWC, haven't decided yet.
     
  11. rhaekar

    rhaekar Member

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    If you don't think you'll own a non-Tesla EV, then I'd say the HPWC is worth it. You can go 60 amps and get 44 mph charge and never have to worry about rolling up your UMC and packing it away when you leave home. Over the life of my Tesla ownership, I think the $500 will pay for itself in convenience.
     
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  12. theishu

    theishu Member

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    Obviously, Tesla recommends the HPWC, but are there any thoughts on NEMA 14-50 being better, because of a slower charging rate? I could really use the advice, now that I'm in the charging installation phase.
     
  13. gaswalla

    gaswalla P4201/85/airsusp/pano/19i

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    slower is not necessarily better as efficiency seems to increase with higher amperage.
    That being said, the NEMA installation is very versatile for future proofing and charging at 30mph (gen2 UMC on M3) vs 44mph won't be a meaningful difference unless you are driving >250 miles a day routinely .
     
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  14. BrokerDon

    BrokerDon Active Member

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    Tesla Wall Charger is also great:
    1. when (not if) you forget to plug in at night with a low battery and need a quick bunch of kW to go to work (been there, done that)
    2. to charge to 100% right before you leave for a road trip needing a full charge
    3. if you have dual 40A chargers (older Model S option) or 72A charger in newer Model S and Model X
    4. to show non-Tesla owners how cool charging looks with the pulsing green LEDs when it's charging
    5. if you've got a performance model (like our P85D+), charging, and turn on Max Battery Power
    6. to charge 2 Teslas
    We're really glad we have our gen1 Tesla High Power Wall Charger and really love it since it was included on our "inventory" car invoice.
     
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  15. BrokerDon

    BrokerDon Active Member

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    One tip to easily get competitive bids for your 14-50 and Tesla Wall Charger electrical quotes. Take high resolution pictures of your Main Service Panel, electrical meter, and subpanel (if any), electrical panel labels, and location where your Tesla charger / 14-50 outlet will be mounted. You can then text or email these to electricians which should save them the drive to your house for a quote. Also works great for getting solar quotes too since the electricians can see if there's "breaker space" to install your Tesla charger / 14-50 outlet.
     
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