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Hurricanes and EVs?

Discussion in 'Electric Vehicles' started by mklcolvin, May 29, 2012.

  1. mklcolvin

    mklcolvin #P-5058

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    Found an article on gm-volt.com, in which the driver described his experience with the Volt during an extended power outage from a tropical storm. Since I live in hurricane territory (Louisiana), I wondered if it would be possible to recharge an EV using a home generator in case of such an emergency? What would be the pitfalls (square wave output vs. sinusoidal, current, running out of gas)?
     
  2. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    Reportedly, Transport Canada tried to charge their Tesla Roadster with six different generators, of different types and vintages. None worked.
     
  3. dsm363

    dsm363 Roadster + Sig Model S

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    The larger the battery pack you get, the easier it might be but depending on how bad to storm is, hopefully you can find an outlet somewhere in an emergency. Even if it's only a 110V outlet. The Model S can sit at empty for a month before you risk damaging the battery too. While you might not have a car to drive during that time, hopefully getting power restored wouldn't take long.

    What's been your experience in the past with how long power is out? Do some of your friends have power when you haven't?
     
  4. ggr

    ggr Roadster R80 537, SigS P85 29

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    When San Diego had a major power outage a few months ago, many people were very surprised to find they couldn't "charge" their gas cars... the gas station pumps were all out of action.
     
  5. doug

    doug Administrator / Head Moderator

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  6. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    Just last week the power was out for four hours. Had it lasted another hour I would have had to power down my UPS.
     
  7. mklcolvin

    mklcolvin #P-5058

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    3 days has been my tops so far... Actually that was from a freak ice storm (seems to happen every 20 years or so).
     
  8. daniel

    daniel Active Member

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    When I lived in rural North Dakota I experienced power outages of a few hours a few times a year, a day or so once every few years, and once for three days after an ice storm. Ice storms are the worst in that part of the country because they take down power lines over a wide area.

    As a society we are utterly dependent on the delivery of energy, either as electricity, gasoline, or natural or lp gas. An interruption of any of those will severely affect anyone who uses them, and we all use one or more of them, unless you live in a wood-heated cabin in the woods and never go to town to buy anything. If you want to be safe you have back-ups using different kinds of energy.

    Bottom line: If your power is out, your EV won't run, and you'd be well advised not to run it to empty. Leave some charge in it in case the outage is extended. Or install solar or wind power. If the gasoline stops arriving at your gas station, your stinker won't run. If you're concerned about hurricanes, which is more likely to be available after a storm: gasoline or electricity? I don't know the answer to that, but if you live there you probably do.
     
  9. Robert.Boston

    Robert.Boston Model S VIN P01536

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    In a hurricane, one serious problem is that the traffic congestion is severe getting out of coastal areas. Long lines of bumper-to-bumper traffic; people regularly run out of gas as the traffic creeps along. EVs are great in this situation.
     
  10. DuncanWatson

    DuncanWatson Member

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    For severe disaster evacuation bikes are often the best vehicle. Nimble narrow vehicles also do well so motorcycles (low range) and something like the c-1 (lit motors) woould also fare well. But the classic mountain bike is very good, a carbo bike would also work. My velomobile would be good but still could run into rubble issues, absent rubble and blockage issues my velomobile would be great.
     
  11. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    After the Japanese earthquake/tsunami, gasoline supplies were interrupted, but electricity was restored in many areas fairly quickly. As a result EVs were pressed into service delivering relief supplies to affected communities.
     

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