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Hyundai Ioniq 5

Apologies if I'm missing it, but was surprised to see no discussion on the announced Ioniq 5. I kind of love it, iit looks so comfy! (feet rests on the front seats? yeas please! and I dig the pass through on the front seats as well) And its just refreshing to start seeing some of the production vehicles coming out looking like the concept vehicles, instead of the inevitable morphing of sameness that most concept vehicles end up turning into, hopefully the freedom of the EV platform encourages more of this (the Honda E being the other one I'm thinking of that followed through on the concept, fingers crossed that the Honda Sports EV comes to life someday - course the real test for Hyundai will be how close the Prophecy comes to that sexy AF concept revealed last year).

2022 Hyundai IONIQ 5
 
I like it. Just disappointed with the range and performance. It's not BAD, but I feel like Tesla has set the bar and anything coming out from here on should be at least as good or better. That means 300 mile range is the absolute minimum and really should be higher, with sub 5 second 0-60. If not, then why choose it over what Tesla already offers?
 
Very nice looking auto. Same concerns over range as mentioned earlier in this thread (ought to be more!!).

One sticking point that I'd have trouble getting over is the reliability of the DCFC charging network. I know it's getting better, but until I see a bunch of people who actually "know" and who state the DCFC system is as reliable and user friendly as the Tesla system I ain't going nowhere!!

Rich
 
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Cosmacelf

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Mar 6, 2013
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Very nice looking auto. Same concerns over range as mentioned earlier in this thread (ought to be more!!).

One sticking point that I'd have trouble getting over is the reliability of the DCFC charging network. I know it's getting better, but until I see a bunch of people who actually "know" and who state the DCFC system is as reliable and user friendly as the Tesla system I ain't going nowhere!!

Rich

And how are we going to hear about such DCFC system reliability? Certainly not here on the Tesla forums...
 

mark95476

Active Member
Jun 21, 2020
2,067
1,598
Bay Area CA
Agreed. It looks amazing and love that the EV industry is pushing things forward! I can't wait for the tests and reviews after it's released.

Apologies if I'm missing it, but was surprised to see no discussion on the announced Ioniq 5. I kind of love it, iit looks so comfy! (feet rests on the front seats? yeas please! and I dig the pass through on the front seats as well) And its just refreshing to start seeing some of the production vehicles coming out looking like the concept vehicles, instead of the inevitable morphing of sameness that most concept vehicles end up turning into, hopefully the freedom of the EV platform encourages more of this (the Honda E being the other one I'm thinking of that followed through on the concept, fingers crossed that the Honda Sports EV comes to life someday - course the real test for Hyundai will be how close the Prophecy comes to that sexy AF concept revealed last year).

2022 Hyundai IONIQ 5
 
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I like it. Just disappointed with the range and performance. It's not BAD, but I feel like Tesla has set the bar and anything coming out from here on should be at least as good or better. That means 300 mile range is the absolute minimum and really should be higher, with sub 5 second 0-60. If not, then why choose it over what Tesla already offers?

Tesla had to hit that 300 mile range cause everyone kept saying that's the "barrier" for EVs, and the 0-60 times was just Tesla proving EVs can be fun. But now that we're there, EVs are more common (kinda) I don't think you have to hit crazy specs to convince people they're real cars anymore, Tesla broke that glass ceiling so to speak. So I don't think every upcoming EV has to be competing in a spec race of longest range or fastest 0-60 (especially now that fast charge is genuinely becoming fast!). I think the more Teslas and Bolts and Leafs and Konas people see on the road, the less concern there will be about 240 miles versus 320 miles of range.

There will always be a market for longer range EVs of course, just like there's always a market for people looking for the best MPG ICE vehicle, but for most people that doesn't have to be the deciding factor. But I've long been of the opinion that anything over 200 miles is a perfectly capable daily driver, so I'm more than happy to see these 200-300 mile range vehicles coming out marketed towards different ideas of what a consumer might be looking for, whether that's comfort, or the luxury rides of Audi, the bleeding edge tech of Teslas, or just something that appeals to different aesthetic tastes like a Mach E or Rivian.
 
Tesla had to hit that 300 mile range cause everyone kept saying that's the "barrier" for EVs, and the 0-60 times was just Tesla proving EVs can be fun. But now that we're there, EVs are more common (kinda) I don't think you have to hit crazy specs to convince people they're real cars anymore, Tesla broke that glass ceiling so to speak. So I don't think every upcoming EV has to be competing in a spec race of longest range or fastest 0-60 (especially now that fast charge is genuinely becoming fast!). I think the more Teslas and Bolts and Leafs and Konas people see on the road, the less concern there will be about 240 miles versus 320 miles of range.

There will always be a market for longer range EVs of course, just like there's always a market for people looking for the best MPG ICE vehicle, but for most people that doesn't have to be the deciding factor. But I've long been of the opinion that anything over 200 miles is a perfectly capable daily driver, so I'm more than happy to see these 200-300 mile range vehicles coming out marketed towards different ideas of what a consumer might be looking for, whether that's comfort, or the luxury rides of Audi, the bleeding edge tech of Teslas, or just something that appeals to different aesthetic tastes like a Mach E or Rivian.

Those are good points. I guess my point was that unless the other car is WAY cheaper, why settle for less range and performance for similar price? That's what turned me off about the Mustang Mach-E. It wasn't actually the styling, it's that it has less range and performance than a comparable Model Y for the price. To even get close you have to step up to the top trim GT model and now you are well into the $60K+. You could get a Model Y AWD with Performance Boost for like $10K less. Just an example.
 

ItsNotAboutTheMoney

Well-Known Member
Jul 12, 2012
11,659
9,756
Maine
Those are good points. I guess my point was that unless the other car is WAY cheaper, why settle for less range and performance for similar price? That's what turned me off about the Mustang Mach-E. It wasn't actually the styling, it's that it has less range and performance than a comparable Model Y for the price. To even get close you have to step up to the top trim GT model and now you are well into the $60K+. You could get a Model Y AWD with Performance Boost for like $10K less. Just an example.

Compact crossovers are the core market for a reason.

We didn't buy Tesla substantially because we didn't want a mid-size.
 
I like it. Just disappointed with the range and performance. It's not BAD, but I feel like Tesla has set the bar and anything coming out from here on should be at least as good or better. That means 300 mile range is the absolute minimum and really should be higher, with sub 5 second 0-60. If not, then why choose it over what Tesla already offers?

It's very comparable to the market, and what people need. We've been spoiled with Tesla.

Plenty of reasons people do NOT want a Tesla. Mainly, because it's not a Tesla. Also, not everyone is into the minimalist interior, or abandoning the traditional dealership.

This car will do well.

I also like it and can’t wait for their upcoming full sized SUV. I’m not surprised on range, only Tesla seems to have the secret sauce on that. It is adequate. Has anyone seen rear cargo space with the hatch open? I wasn’t able to see pictures of that yet.

Tesla's secret sauce is to do the EPA test in a manner which gives good results and is hardly ever achievable in the real world. While other manufacturers take the more conservative rating and usually are pretty easy to beat the rated range.


Tesla had to hit that 300 mile range cause everyone kept saying that's the "barrier" for EVs, and the 0-60 times was just Tesla proving EVs can be fun. But now that we're there, EVs are more common (kinda) I don't think you have to hit crazy specs to convince people they're real cars anymore, Tesla broke that glass ceiling so to speak. So I don't think every upcoming EV has to be competing in a spec race of longest range or fastest 0-60 (especially now that fast charge is genuinely becoming fast!). I think the more Teslas and Bolts and Leafs and Konas people see on the road, the less concern there will be about 240 miles versus 320 miles of range.

There will always be a market for longer range EVs of course, just like there's always a market for people looking for the best MPG ICE vehicle, but for most people that doesn't have to be the deciding factor. But I've long been of the opinion that anything over 200 miles is a perfectly capable daily driver, so I'm more than happy to see these 200-300 mile range vehicles coming out marketed towards different ideas of what a consumer might be looking for, whether that's comfort, or the luxury rides of Audi, the bleeding edge tech of Teslas, or just something that appeals to different aesthetic tastes like a Mach E or Rivian.

Bingo.

Anyone know the price?

Has not been released yet.
 

Cosmacelf

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Mar 6, 2013
9,395
25,375
San Diego
Tesla's secret sauce is to do the EPA test in a manner which gives good results and is hardly ever achievable in the real world. While other manufacturers take the more conservative rating and usually are pretty easy to beat the rated range.

Yes, this does seem to be the case, doesn't it?

"Tesla range" gets knocked down by at least 10% - 15%. So a 300 mile Tesla car is really a 255 to 270 mile car.

Whereas other car EPA ranges can be taken at face value. So it would be equivalent to a 260 mile range in another car.
 
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The EPA lists the 1) city, 2) HIGHWAY, and 3) combined range. My car had the Munroney sticker which listed these.

People, especially "journalists", always ignore the lower HIGHWAY rating and use one of the other higher numbers when they test it on the HIGHWAY as their "real-life" test so they can complain. Duuuhhhh..... :rolleyes:

City: 127 MPGe
Highway: 114 MPGe
Combined: 121 MPGe

Tesla_MY_EPA.jpg



Yes, this does seem to be the case, doesn't it?

"Tesla range" gets knocked down by at least 10% - 15%. So a 300 mile Tesla car is really a 255 to 270 mile car.

Whereas other car EPA ranges can be taken at face value. So it would be equivalent to a 260 mile range in another car.
 
The EPA lists the 1) city, 2) HIGHWAY, and 3) combined range. My car had the Munroney sticker which listed these.

People, especially "journalists", always ignore the lower HIGHWAY...

The city/highway ratings are MPGe #s, not range. EPA only posts one number for range (they SHOULD break it down by city/highway IMO though).

MPGe is maybe useful in comparing the efficiency of different EVs to each other or to ICE vehicles, but it isn’t a terribly helpful number in really any realistic respect, which is the likeliest reason journalist don’t cite it.
 
The EPA lists the 1) city, 2) HIGHWAY, and 3) combined range. My car had the Munroney sticker which listed these.

People, especially "journalists", always ignore the lower HIGHWAY rating and use one of the other higher numbers when they test it on the HIGHWAY as their "real-life" test so they can complain. Duuuhhhh..... :rolleyes:

City: 127 MPGe
Highway: 114 MPGe
Combined: 121 MPGe

View attachment 639940

Then why on an almost all highway test was this Porsche Taycan able to best the EPA rated range by 40%.


Here is a Mustang Mach E meeting it's EPA range on the nose despite being mostly highway:


Don't bury your head in the sand. Teslas have trouble achieving their EPA rated range. Many other EV's have no trouble exceeding it.
 
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