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I don't really understand everything that's involved with charging :-(

EVer Hopeful

Member
Jul 7, 2021
814
648
Texas
No I'm not asking to have it spoon fed to me here; I'm not that lazy. I'll do some searches, here and on the internet in general

I'm just making the point that I pretty much understand everything else about the car (I think). I've read (most of) the manual, I've attended the Tesla Owners' Workshop, I've done test drives to get the feel of the car and I've done test drives to try out specific features. I've even started to get used to the Regen, although I wish they'd keep the three levels to help make the transition. I even know about the A and B on the Superchargers, so hopefully will be able to avoid that noob mistake 😇

The charging just seems so different though and I imagine that like so many other things, you really need to give it a go to dispel some of the mystery

What's odd though is - probably because of my lack of knowledge - I've spent way more time on the other sub-forums: Delivery, interior/exterior etc than I have on this one. I did read enough to realise that even though I'm a pretty hands-on person, I should probably get someone in to install the charger (if I get one) or at least guide me through it

I suppose one good question would be: How long did it take you all to be comfortable with charging and everything it involves.
 

AquaY

Member
Supporting Member
May 30, 2021
475
1,522
Long Island NY
I got lucky in that the previous owner of my house installed a 6-20 outlet in the perfect spot in the garage.
That charges my Model Y at 15 mph.
I decided to try it out before I went through the expense of buying and installing the Tesla charger. I bought the plug from Tesla for $35.
Took me about a month to realize it was all I needed for my lifestyle. I work from home and travel maybe 30 miles daily and about 100 max on any one day unless I am traveling.
The hard part is to get out of the mindset that charging is like filling up with gas. Charging at a charging station is like that.
Charging at home is more like plugging in your cell phone or tablet. Park and Plug and walk away. You use your app or the screen to set your charge level.
I bought the Stat app which I like and its great for setting my percentage.
Search about charging percentages for best battery life. Basically 20-90% is what batteries like. Some say 20-80.
I charge to 80 because its plenty. I go to 90 when I take a trip to my other house which is 183 miles from my main home.
Sadly I only have regular 110 outlets to charge from there for now but it actually works pretty well.
I intend on installing the same outlet there as here 6. -20 which will serve my purposes.
Before i get my Cyber truck I will install the wall charger.

As for super charging , it is extremely simple.
you can use the charger app on the screen to navigate, back in, open your charge port, pulol the charger out and plug it in. Easier than using a gas pump. The thing to note is that once you are finished charging you only have a few minutes to move or you may be charged a loitering fee. Search for info to explain that in your area. I have yet to pay for supper charging because of referral code use but I imagine Tesla charges your account. Someone else needs to explain how that works

As to hooking up the Tesla Wall Charger at home if you have the skills you can but it is 50 or 60 amp 220 service that you must hook up directly to your circuit breaker box and if you’ve never done that before I suggest you hire an electrician.
Other than that I’m not sure what your concerns are regarding charging
 

golferguy

Member
Jan 30, 2021
123
165
SE Florida
Its very simple.
Home Charging: Minimally Acceptable is a 120V outlet. Think of it like dial up for speed of charging. And more costly since its not very efficient.

Good to have a 240V outlet such as Nema 14-50 installed. This is a 50A circuit.

Better is a Tesla Wall Charger mounted on the wall, instead of the outlet. This is a 60A circuit and about 25% faster. But will cost $500+ more.

SuperCharging: Not much to think about. Use your car navigation screen and it will tell you where to stop and predict how long the SuperCharging stop is going to be. Just plug in and your credit card in your Tesla account is charged.


I could go on from here but if you start with the two situations above, that's going to cover most if not all your needs.
 
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jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
12,390
14,715
Riverside Co. CA
No I'm not asking to have it spoon fed to me here; I'm not that lazy. I'll do some searches, here and on the internet in general

I'm just making the point that I pretty much understand everything else about the car (I think). I've read (most of) the manual, I've attended the Tesla Owners' Workshop, I've done test drives to get the feel of the car and I've done test drives to try out specific features. I've even started to get used to the Regen, although I wish they'd keep the three levels to help make the transition. I even know about the A and B on the Superchargers, so hopefully will be able to avoid that noob mistake 😇

The charging just seems so different though and I imagine that like so many other things, you really need to give it a go to dispel some of the mystery

What's odd though is - probably because of my lack of knowledge - I've spent way more time on the other sub-forums: Delivery, interior/exterior etc than I have on this one. I did read enough to realise that even though I'm a pretty hands-on person, I should probably get someone in to install the charger (if I get one) or at least guide me through it

I suppose one good question would be: How long did it take you all to be comfortable with charging and everything it involves.


Most of the stuff on TMC highly (highly highly) overcomplicates charging.

All you need to do is get an outlet put close to where you park, if possible, and plug in when you get home. Set the car at somewhere between any of the lines that show in the tesla app as "daily usage" (from 50% to 90%), and thats it. Literally thats it. No need to set it to 83.3364926230474% on tuesdays but only if the sun is out.

No need to keep charts the last time you plugged in, or wonder if its ok to plug in every day or not (either is fine). No need to stress about "if you are doing it right" (although a lot of people here enjoy the %[email protected]$ out of stressing about this stuff).

Just ask an electrician "what is the fastest 240v plug I can put in my panel without upgrades, for charging an EV, up to 60amp?", have them put it in, and plug in when you get home.
 
I had a PHEV for 3 years prior to the Tesla. So I got used to plugging in, but never experienced range anxiety.

My house built in 2017 came with wiring for a 240v 30amp outlet in the garage. I just had to install the outlet when I knew I was getting a MY. Did it myself and cost $15. No need to go 50 amp or 60 amp for a wall charger. I actually now just charge at 18 amp instead of the max 24 because it’s still plenty quick. As previously mentioned, just install what your panel can handle and you should be fine.

I think it takes a day to get used to charging at home. Road trips are a different story. I was a bit stressed at taking a 715 mile trip to Michigan after a week of ownership. I have a 3 year old and didn’t want to get there by midnight. Ended up being only 3 supercharger stops (including a 1 hr stop for lunch) and took about an hour longer than with a gas car would have been. Would have stopped for lunch and bathroom breaks anyway. Got there at 8 PM (13 hrs) and it was a great ride. Ride home was a bit quicker and can’t wait for the next road trip in August!
 
Last edited:

WADan

Member
Sep 28, 2020
413
608
Bellevue WA
No I'm not asking to have it spoon fed to me here; I'm not that lazy. I'll do some searches, here and on the internet in general

I'm just making the point that I pretty much understand everything else about the car (I think). I've read (most of) the manual, I've attended the Tesla Owners' Workshop, I've done test drives to get the feel of the car and I've done test drives to try out specific features. I've even started to get used to the Regen, although I wish they'd keep the three levels to help make the transition. I even know about the A and B on the Superchargers, so hopefully will be able to avoid that noob mistake 😇

The charging just seems so different though and I imagine that like so many other things, you really need to give it a go to dispel some of the mystery

What's odd though is - probably because of my lack of knowledge - I've spent way more time on the other sub-forums: Delivery, interior/exterior etc than I have on this one. I did read enough to realise that even though I'm a pretty hands-on person, I should probably get someone in to install the charger (if I get one) or at least guide me through it

I suppose one good question would be: How long did it take you all to be comfortable with charging and everything it involves.
If you are hands-on, you should be able to install a Nema 14/50 yourself too. It’s really not that scary if you know how to turn off the breaker to your panel. I watched YouTube videos, and did the whole thing myself. Total costs were about $250 including a GFCI breaker, 25 ft wire and 25 ft conduit, an industrial outlet, inspection fee.
 
You sometimes don't need to spend a lot. My detached garage had 240V 20A circuit for my saw and I added an additional 6-20 outlet and charge at 15A. That provides 14-15 miles range per hour of charge which is more than sufficient for my needs. Now if you need to get an electrician out to run a new wire and your panel has the capacity you might want to run a large circuit for potential future needs- second vehicle. Up cost may not be too much more depending on distance and what needs to be done. I'd at least ask the question.
 
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Just ask an electrician "what is the fastest 240v plug I can put in my panel without upgrades, for charging an EV, up to 60amp?", have them put it in, and plug in when you get home.
Thanks for the feedback/info. I've digested this and other reading and am now back for some final coaching on this subject (if going to L2, which L2?). When you say 'fastest plug' I assume you mean 'how many amps will my panel hold?' - the answer is 'a lot' so I have no limitation there. It seems to me that my choice is:
Get the Tesla Wall Connector and install on 60 amp breaker
Get a 14/50 adapter and install on a 50 amp breaker (and use the Mobile Connector provided).

With an M3 SR+ I can only utilize 40 amps, so the bigger question seems to be long term cost/flexibility. NEMA 14/50 could be used on a non-Tesla EV some day and seems cheaper to install (at the possible inconvenience/cost of either buying a second Mobile Connector or using the one provided and taking it out/putting it back over and over). Tesla Wall Connector (costs $) could be used on a future Tesla that can draw more power than my M3 SR+.

I'm posting these thoughts/questions to see if I'm missing any other consideration (cost/functionality) in deciding between 'just a plug' and a 'Tesla Wall Connector' - thanks for any thoughts anyone has about choosing the right L2 charger.
 
Thanks for the feedback/info. I've digested this and other reading and am now back for some final coaching on this subject (if going to L2, which L2?). When you say 'fastest plug' I assume you mean 'how many amps will my panel hold?' - the answer is 'a lot' so I have no limitation there. It seems to me that my choice is:
Get the Tesla Wall Connector and install on 60 amp breaker
Get a 14/50 adapter and install on a 50 amp breaker (and use the Mobile Connector provided).

With an M3 SR+ I can only utilize 40 amps, so the bigger question seems to be long term cost/flexibility. NEMA 14/50 could be used on a non-Tesla EV some day and seems cheaper to install (at the possible inconvenience/cost of either buying a second Mobile Connector or using the one provided and taking it out/putting it back over and over). Tesla Wall Connector (costs $) could be used on a future Tesla that can draw more power than my M3 SR+.

I'm posting these thoughts/questions to see if I'm missing any other consideration (cost/functionality) in deciding between 'just a plug' and a 'Tesla Wall Connector' - thanks for any thoughts anyone has about choosing the right L2 charger.
Personally I think for the M3 SR+ the Tesla Wall Connector is overkill. However, if you want to have an extra mobile connector in the car at all times, there is that benefit without needing to buy a 2nd one. And don't write off the Wall Connector as "Tesla only". Since Tesla will be opening their Supercharging Network to all EVs, they will be making an official adapter, which you could buy and use at home for a non-Tesla.

I have a MY LR and the 14-30 is more than enough. But a 14-50 would be more future proof.
 
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Thanks for the feedback/info. I've digested this and other reading and am now back for some final coaching on this subject (if going to L2, which L2?). When you say 'fastest plug' I assume you mean 'how many amps will my panel hold?' - the answer is 'a lot' so I have no limitation there. It seems to me that my choice is:
Get the Tesla Wall Connector and install on 60 amp breaker
Get a 14/50 adapter and install on a 50 amp breaker (and use the Mobile Connector provided).

With an M3 SR+ I can only utilize 40 amps, so the bigger question seems to be long term cost/flexibility. NEMA 14/50 could be used on a non-Tesla EV some day and seems cheaper to install (at the possible inconvenience/cost of either buying a second Mobile Connector or using the one provided and taking it out/putting it back over and over). Tesla Wall Connector (costs $) could be used on a future Tesla that can draw more power than my M3 SR+.

I'm posting these thoughts/questions to see if I'm missing any other consideration (cost/functionality) in deciding between 'just a plug' and a 'Tesla Wall Connector' - thanks for any thoughts anyone has about choosing the right L2 charger.
I guess I should have included a 14-30 plug as an additional low end option - slower charging, no GFCI, lower $.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
4,336
4,503
Maryland
The 2017 NEC specifies that all new circuits for charging an EV, regardless of circuit rating, require a GFCI. A NEMA 14-30 receptacle and a 30A circuit for charging your Tesla may, depending on where you live, have adopted the 2017 NEC and now require a GFCI.

You don't want to regularly plug and unplug the Tesla Mobile Connector from the power receptacle. All power receptacles will wear out eventually, get loose over time from age and repeated plugging and unplugging. The higher amperage receptacles, i.e 14-50, 14-30 are not designed for a many plug and unplug operations. If you think about how a 14-50 receptacle is typically used in a home, i.e. for an electric range or wall oven and electric dryer where these appliances hardly ever gets unplugged.

The M3 SR+ can charge at Level 2 at a maximum of 32A, not 40A. The minimum circuit rating would be 40A. The 14-30 receptacle would enable charging at up to 24A with a 30A circuit. If you want to charge the M3 SR+ at 32A you can use the NEMA 14-50 plug adapter and a NEMA 14-50 receptacle. (The NEMA 14-50 receptacles is rated for 50A but can be used on a 40A circuit if there is not sufficient capacity to install a 50A circuit. The receptacle would be labeled as 40A to avoid any confusion.)
 
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jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
12,390
14,715
Riverside Co. CA
Thanks for the feedback/info. I've digested this and other reading and am now back for some final coaching on this subject (if going to L2, which L2?). When you say 'fastest plug' I assume you mean 'how many amps will my panel hold?' - the answer is 'a lot' so I have no limitation there. It seems to me that my choice is:
Get the Tesla Wall Connector and install on 60 amp breaker
Get a 14/50 adapter and install on a 50 amp breaker (and use the Mobile Connector provided).

With an M3 SR+ I can only utilize 40 amps, so the bigger question seems to be long term cost/flexibility. NEMA 14/50 could be used on a non-Tesla EV some day and seems cheaper to install (at the possible inconvenience/cost of either buying a second Mobile Connector or using the one provided and taking it out/putting it back over and over). Tesla Wall Connector (costs $) could be used on a future Tesla that can draw more power than my M3 SR+.

I'm posting these thoughts/questions to see if I'm missing any other consideration (cost/functionality) in deciding between 'just a plug' and a 'Tesla Wall Connector' - thanks for any thoughts anyone has about choosing the right L2 charger.

There isnt really any benefit in getting the tesla wall connector vs using the mobile connector for a SR+ tesla (3 or Y), other than looks, or if the installation will be outside. The wall connector can be installed outside and withstand weather, and the mobile connector, while it can be used outside and is weather resistant, should not really be left in puddles of water or anything.

The maximum charging speed of a SR+ tesla (32 amps, 40 amp circuit required) can be reached with either device pretty easily. I have a wall connector, am happy with it, and have a tesla that can use the faster charging speed. I like the "permanent" looking nature of the wall connector. Neither of those are necessary, and there is absolutely nothing wrong with installing an outlet and using the mobile connector that comes with the vehicle.

Its the "simplest" option, and will support the charging speed of the car you intend to buy. I would get a 14-50 outlet if my electrical system at home easily supported it, and use the mobile connector that came with the car, in your situation (again, unless you simply like how the wall connector looks).
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
7,271
8,959
Boise, ID
(at the possible inconvenience/cost of either buying a second Mobile Connector or using the one provided and taking it out/putting it back over and over).
Neither of these really. I don't know why so many people think this other than just unknown and fear. There isn't a need to have that cable in the car every single day driving around town. Maybe take it with you a few times a year on a trip if you want. You can leave the mobile charge cable plugged in and hanging on the garage wall pretty much permanently.

I'm posting these thoughts/questions to see if I'm missing any other consideration (cost/functionality) in deciding between 'just a plug' and a 'Tesla Wall Connector' - thanks for any thoughts anyone has about choosing the right L2 charger.
I'm posting these thoughts/questions to see if I'm missing any other consideration (cost/functionality) in deciding between 'just a plug' and a 'Tesla Wall Connector' - thanks for any thoughts anyone has about choosing the right L2 charger.

And to help make sure questions and answers are getting matched up, here's a tip on that terminology: Level 2 is referring to a power level, and anything that is a 240V circuit is Level 2. So the 14-50 outlet, or the Tesla wall connector, or some other brand of unit are all Level 2. The plug format you may be thinking of that the public charging stations use and other companies sell is called J1772. All of the Tesla cars do come with an adapter for that.


The 2017 NEC specifies that all new circuits for charging an EV, regardless of circuit rating, require a GFCI. A NEMA 14-30 receptacle and a 30A circuit for charging your Tesla may, depending on where you live, have adopted the 2017 NEC and now require a GFCI.
I know you're familiar with it from other threads, but I think just used the wrong word. That's not all new circuits, because the hard wired devices don't require that. It's all new receptacles. So it's only the pluggable outlets that have that requirement.
 

acarney

Active Member
Jul 9, 2019
2,889
1,882
Richland, WA
No I'm not asking to have it spoon fed to me here; I'm not that lazy. I'll do some searches, here and on the internet in general

I'm just making the point that I pretty much understand everything else about the car (I think). I've read (most of) the manual, I've attended the Tesla Owners' Workshop, I've done test drives to get the feel of the car and I've done test drives to try out specific features. I've even started to get used to the Regen, although I wish they'd keep the three levels to help make the transition. I even know about the A and B on the Superchargers, so hopefully will be able to avoid that noob mistake 😇

The charging just seems so different though and I imagine that like so many other things, you really need to give it a go to dispel some of the mystery

What's odd though is - probably because of my lack of knowledge - I've spent way more time on the other sub-forums: Delivery, interior/exterior etc than I have on this one. I did read enough to realise that even though I'm a pretty hands-on person, I should probably get someone in to install the charger (if I get one) or at least guide me through it

I suppose one good question would be: How long did it take you all to be comfortable with charging and everything it involves.

Charging is super easy and one of the items to worry about least (If you can charge at home).

If you drive less than 50 miles a day you can probably just live with a standard wall plug in your garage (think any normal plug you would use for anything else in your house). If possible though find an electrician to install a NEMA 14-50 outlet and purchase the NEMA 14-50 adapter from the Tesla Shop.

Set your charge limit to 70% to 80% if you can (this still gives about 150 miles real world range).
Charge to 100% when you need (road trip, long day, etc)

This is your normal daily routine that will cover 90% of what you do. Plug it in every night and forget about it. Get up in the morning and be ready to take on the day, super simple.

When on a road trip put in the destination in the navigation, even if you know what route to take and let the car tell you when and where to charge.

Always charge about 10% more than the car says you need. (Example: If the car says to depart at 60% and you'll get to your destination at 20%, I normally charge to 70% and then leave, unless it's a route I do a lot.) The car is pretty good with estimates, but a rainstorm, driving faster than normal, wind, etc can throw off those estimates just a little. Enjoy your trip, super simple

As you get to know the car and what real range you get with your drive style (going above speed limit, etc) you can start to customize your road trip. If you know you want to take an early lunch and know a supercharger is closer than where the car suggests, just put that supercharger into the nav so the car will be optimized for the fastest charging (battery at the right temperature) and then stop and plug in. Then when you're ready to leave just put in the destination, etc. Eventually we'll get way point options in the nav and this will be easier, but until then you can go step by step and basically do the same, just always put stuff into the nav when on road trips so it will show estimates of range AND so it will always have that battery at the right temperature to charge as fast as possible.

Charging is honestly pretty easy with Tesla. It's a nice reliable ecosystem and everything is just one or two steps (set nav, plug in, etc).
 
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