Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register
  • The final cut of the 8th episode of the Tesla Motors Club Podcast, featuring Balazs Biro, of the prominent Hungarian EV channel Villanyautósok, is now available. You can watch it now on YouTube or listen to it on all major podcast networks.

I just added a standard range Model Y to my garage to join my long range Model Y. Range thoughts...

As I mentioned in the title, I just added a SR Model Y (for my wife) which joins my LR Model Y.
I feel so lucky to have found it. Someone else had ordered it and was non-responsive when Tesla reached out for delivery and my Tesla rep was able to grab it. We took delivery just a few days ago. But I digress...
I believe the range for the 2020 Model Y was quoted at 303 miles. I charge my car to about 80 percent which gives me a quoted range of 250 miles. Since my last charge, I have driven 45 miles but lost 80 miles of range. A few of those miles were last overnight, but the point is that the "quoted" range is nowhere near reality. As computer based as these cars are, it would be very simple for the available range to be based on historical driving (maybe past 1,000 miles) of the car. I know those numbers are available in the energy section of the in-car screen, but it seems pretty ingenious that Tesla are having the car show a 250 mile range when it will never even get close. My driving since my last charge was all local street driving (no highway driving) where I believe the car is more efficient. What numbers are you getting on your car?
 
It will most definitely reach the advertised range, but the conditions have to be right in order for this to be true. If you're traveling above 60 mph, against the wind, in the rain, in the cold, the max range on a full charge will be impacted. This applies to any EV, not just Tesla.

The fact of the matter is that EV's are extremely efficient, especially when compared to an ICE, obviously. EV's are so efficient that they are inherently impacted to a higher degree when you involve certain conditions that impact energy consumption as described above. In comparison, an ICE is so inefficient that you can't hardly notice a range decrease in the same driving conditions.

Thanks to the energy density of gasoline/diesel, the extra energy consumption rate doesn't reduce the range nearly as much. Being that one gallon of gasoline is equivalent to 33.4 kWh of energy, it should become obvious why you cannot apply the same range expectations to EV's that apply to ICE vehicles.
 
Last edited:
So help me understand your post. You start off telling everyone you just bought a SR Model Y as your 2nd Tesla in your garage and then you go on and on about how the "quoted range is no where near reality". Surely, as a Tesla owner you already know about range and all of the variables that effect it in real driving experiences. Secondly, do yourself a favor and change your battery display to percent instead of miles. You'll be less stressed about range and enjoy your car.
 

mark95476

Active Member
Jun 21, 2020
2,067
1,595
Bay Area CA
Going uphill at highway speeds is as inefficient as you can get. 970 Wh/mi with only 50 miles of range left! :D

Tesla_MY_970whmi.jpg


As I mentioned in the title, I just added a SR Model Y (for my wife) which joins my LR Model Y.
I feel so lucky to have found it. Someone else had ordered it and was non-responsive when Tesla reached out for delivery and my Tesla rep was able to grab it. We took delivery just a few days ago. But I digress...
I believe the range for the 2020 Model Y was quoted at 303 miles. I charge my car to about 80 percent which gives me a quoted range of 250 miles. Since my last charge, I have driven 45 miles but lost 80 miles of range. A few of those miles were last overnight, but the point is that the "quoted" range is nowhere near reality. As computer based as these cars are, it would be very simple for the available range to be based on historical driving (maybe past 1,000 miles) of the car. I know those numbers are available in the energy section of the in-car screen, but it seems pretty ingenious that Tesla are having the car show a 250 mile range when it will never even get close. My driving since my last charge was all local street driving (no highway driving) where I believe the car is more efficient. What numbers are you getting on your car?
 
So help me understand your post. You start off telling everyone you just bought a SR Model Y as your 2nd Tesla in your garage and then you go on and on about how the "quoted range is no where near reality". Surely, as a Tesla owner you already know about range and all of the variables that effect it in real driving experiences. Secondly, do yourself a favor and change your battery display to percent instead of miles. You'll be less stressed about range and enjoy your car.
Hey Rick. So my post was about my LR Model Y. The SR vehicle is parked in my garage waiting for my wife to return from an out of town trip, and has only been driven 25 miles. I do understand how variables effect range (perhaps not much as you). My point is that the range that Tesla quotes is unattainable. Perhaps in perfect conditions, but what are perfect conditions? Downhill with the wind behind you? My point is that I don't think that the car should be quoting a range which is unattainable. I did take your advice and I've changed my battery display to percent. Just like my phone. I actually think that makes a lot of sense. I'm also now watching the "real" range on the energy tab based on my last 5, 15, 30 miles of driving. That seems to be the attainable range of my car in real world driving conditions. I think your suggestion is terrific as it removes the focus from the unattainable to the attainable and truly it's more important how much energy the battery actually has remaining versus an arbitrary remaining range number. Thank you.
 
All of this confusion could be avoided if the majority of consumers were able to understand/quantify the new rates of consumption involving electricity. Unfortunately, we are still a long ways away from the transition to Monroney stickers that use the energy consumption rate unit that EV's use, Wh/mi.

Until this happens, EV manufacturers will be forced to give the best case scenario full charge range, which tends to be much more misleading than the rate of consumption. I think the same confusion would happen if ICE vehicles shared their max range rather than their MPG. Also, the MPG rating is the same best case scenario.. which is just as difficult to reach if similar precautions aren't taken.

In other words, Tesla is trying to be an transparent as they can be from my perspective, but their hands are tied somewhat due to what consumers are familiar with.
 

mark95476

Active Member
Jun 21, 2020
2,067
1,595
Bay Area CA
253 Wh/mi average over ~7k miles. It blows my mind how efficient the MY is considering where and how I've been driving.

My old gasser would get ~10 mpg (or roughly half of EPA rated 20 mpg) when I had to go over mountains.

MY_Efficiency_7k_miles.jpg


To get the EPA rated range you’d have to manage to get about 250 wh/mi. Doubtful at any speed over 55 mph, even under perfect conditions. The EPA rating is overly optimistic in the real world. Maybe they should show a CITY and HIGHWAY rating?
 
My daily commute in my MYP is 40 miles round trip.

My morning trip Ive noticed is around 25-28 mile total. I imagine the 5-8 miles is due to me being on the highway and driving faster due to less traffic in the AM.

My trip back home involves much more traffic especially in Los Angeles and on paper its 20 miles but I've notice the more traffic I have the better battery life I get when I get home. I believe the last few times with tracking my start mile available and when I got home was 18 miles , 20 miles, 22 miles.

I think if I really wanted to I can get lower or at the rated range but thats no fun. I drive it like I have unlimited battery because my commutes are always the same/ similar route and I charge every Friday when I get to work. ( I spend 10 hours or more at work and charging at work is free)
 
Yet another range misunderstanding post. Surely ya’ll drove ICE cars before. Did you guys ever measure how many miles you get in a single full tank of gas? If so, did you consistently get the same miles? If not, did you go to the car’s forum and complain? I think you guys are putting too much effort into all this.
 
Yet another range misunderstanding post. Surely ya’ll drove ICE cars before. Did you guys ever measure how many miles you get in a single full tank of gas? If so, did you consistently get the same miles? If not, did you go to the car’s forum and complain? I think you guys are putting too much effort into all this.

No way to know, gas pumps don't show miles per gallon at the pump like a Tesla charger unfortunately.
 
I'm always baffled by the obsession new EV owners have with miles. I suppose it's an ingrained habit but it's about as useful as measuring cubits per dogecoin.

Drive your car until the battery is low (~20%), then charge to 80%. Repeat. This is what you have likely been doing in your ICE car for your entire life, why do you all of a sudden obsess with how many miles it is to your workplace and how many kWH the EPA says it should take?

Do you scrutinize how many kWH your dishwasher consumes when you push all the optional cycle buttons? I'm guessing you're probably just happy your dishes are clean and you remember to push the same buttons next time.
 
I'm always baffled by the obsession new EV owners have with miles. I suppose it's an ingrained habit but it's about as useful as measuring cubits per dogecoin.

Drive your car until the battery is low (~20%), then charge to 80%. Repeat. This is what you have likely been doing in your ICE car for your entire life, why do you all of a sudden obsess with how many miles it is to your workplace and how many kWH the EPA says it should take?

Do you scrutinize how many kWH your dishwasher consumes when you push all the optional cycle buttons? I'm guessing you're probably just happy your dishes are clean and you remember to push the same buttons next time.
I can estimate my range in a second by looking at SOC. I love the look on my GF's face when she shows me how many miles she still has left and I change it to percent and she's shocked to see she is at 15%.
 
To get the EPA rated range you’d have to manage to get about 250 wh/mi. Doubtful at any speed over 55 mph, even under perfect conditions. The EPA rating is overly optimistic in the real world. Maybe they should show a CITY and HIGHWAY rating?
I very routinely get 250 wH/mi. I'm not heavy on the accelerator and virtually never drive over 60 MPH, though.

Never understood why anyone would do that, since that is based on EPA consumption it is pretty useless. I only look at the kW rate when charging.

No one ever complains that they don't get the same gas milage as the sticker at the dealer showed...

The reality is, that EVs are not as easy to refuel as ICE vehicles are. Charging stations are less common than gas stations and it takes longer, so you notice your battery charge in an EV much more than you do in an ICE vehicle. I charge at home, but participate in a discount program so I can only charge at night, further limiting my charging options.

IME, the variation in 'fuel economy' with EVs is much greater than with ICE vehicles, too. I often get 250 wH/mi in nice weather but during cold winter days I would easily hit 500, meaning my range drops from 300 miles down to 150.
 
Last edited:

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top