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I was pulling on a 120v , 3 mile an hour now only 1 mile an hour!

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by AprilDelivery??, Jul 4, 2013.

  1. AprilDelivery??

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    I was pulling on a 120v , 3 mile an hour now only 1 mile an hour. I was charging at 3 mils an hour last night at 12 amps then over night it switched over to 1 miles an hour 5 amps. I think the the electric co. Is cutting down on amperage because of summer constraints? Or is it my Tesla power cord or something else?
     
  2. cinergi

    cinergi Active Member

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  3. AprilDelivery??

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    I used the 14-50 adapter with the umc and it was pulling 40 amp. So i think its the 120 adapter and I will try to bring it in to the Tesla Store or center and try it there. I can use theirs to see if their 120 adapter works on my car.
     
  4. Lloyd

    Lloyd Active Member

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    It may be that the 120V plug that you are using is with 14 ga wire with a long run. The car will cut down on rate if it detects a drop. What amperage are you seeing?
     
  5. AprilDelivery??

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    I see 1 mile an hour at 5 amperage and 115v . I have been using the same outlet for two months with no problems and it was pulling 3 mile an hour at 12 amperage and 118v. But I noticed that when i got the 120 adapter that it was loose so maybe it got less tighter?
     
  6. yobigd20

    yobigd20 Well-Known Member

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    I doubt thats a dedicated circuit. So whenever anything else on that circuit is turned on (kitchen lights, tv, fridge, etc), the amount of amps available to charge your car will drop since the power is shared.
     
  7. wycolo

    wycolo Active Member

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    The Roadster can survive on 120v, but the S?? It really, really wants 240v. Is there *any* way you can get 240v at 20A to your S? Even 15A. You need a break from this tsuris, and soon!

    Btw, feel around on the umc and the cords/adapters for warm/hot spots. Maybe give prongs a slight twist to improve contact.
    --
     
  8. AprilDelivery??

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    Seems like I was right that Con Edison (electric co) is cutting down on the electric amperage to my house during the summer. I spoke to Tesla service center and they got a log of my Model S from Tesla . They said that they are showing a cut down on amperage going into my house this past week. Because during the summer the amps used are triple cause we use 1 or 2 air conditioners during the summer june - august. So just trying to alert all you other Northeast Model S owners of being careful if you use a few air conditioners beware that Con Edison might cut down your amps and then you may have only 5 amps charging you Model S! But it works fine on my 14-50 outlet at 40 amps 23 miles an hour so I'm still a little confused. Maybe because I was charging on the 120v all night at 12amps but I only charge on the 40 amps for an hour or two. It must be the length of time that Con Edison is worried about not the amperage size.
     
  9. Stoneymonster

    Stoneymonster Active Member

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    I have never in my life heard of a utility cutting a customers max power draw. I'm not even sure how they'd do that without causing you a brownout.
    Here in CA, the only way PGE can lower our usage is if we opt in to a program for them to DIRECTLY control our A/C units. If they could just cut our power, that would be easier for them. It doesn't happen (but I'm happy to be corrected if someone has heard of this).

    Plus, you said your 120V outlet went from 12A down to 5A, that's crazy. That's what, a difference of 700 or 800 watts? I can't imagine that being an amount that matters to them. Your wiring has problems or what yobigd said: you share it with a fridge or something.
     
  10. rlang59

    rlang59 Member

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    I can't see how Tesla would know that your house power was limited.
     
  11. AprilDelivery??

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    It just seems strange everything was working fine when I got it on May 5 until three days ago, when we started to use sometimes two air conditioners at the same time with this heat wave was on the east coast. It has to do with the electric because I used the UMC on a different 120v outlet in the same house and got 5 amps.
     
  12. yobigd20

    yobigd20 Well-Known Member

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    So the problem started when you started using 2 air conditioners? Central, portable, or window? If its window units or portable units then wherever you are plugging them in is probably on the same circuit as the plug you are using for the model S.

    And power companies don't "cut amps" to houses. Some of them have opt in programs to "reduce your power consumption during the summer" but what these programs do is replace your thermostat with one that they have control over and during hot days they turn down your central air so your house uses less power. Central air is the bane of power consumption during the summer and makes power distribution very difficult for them to control. Just as an example my power bill during the winter is $150-$200. During the summer it is $600-$700. kWh is like 1000-1500 during winter and 3500+ during summer. The sole difference is the central AC. Oh and my rate is fixed year round (not like some companies that charge more during summer months).
     
  13. Lloyd

    Lloyd Active Member

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    Did you try manually turning the rate back up on the dash? Once the car had dialed it down, it will default to the lower amperage the next time you plug it in there.
     
  14. cinergi

    cinergi Active Member

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    That's not possible and completely wrong. Con Ed is physically incapable of limiting current to your home. My original recommendations still stand.
     
  15. yobigd20

    yobigd20 Well-Known Member

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    Actually, I just found a few articles online that stated that Con Ed does reduce voltages to homes during some periods, otherwise known as intentional "brownouts". This was going on now or last week or something up in Manhattan.

    http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2013/06/25/con-ed-asks-some-brooklyn-residents-to-turn-air-conditioners-off/

    http://www.ny1.com/content/top_stories/184457/con-ed-reduces-power-in-parts-of-brooklyn--asks-for-energy-conservation

    did it last year too:

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/07/18/us-utilities-conedison-heatwave-idUSBRE86H0RM20120718

    and there were other articles for 2011 and 2010. sounds like a crappy utility company to me.
     
  16. stopcrazypp

    stopcrazypp Well-Known Member

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    This thread is talking about a drop in current, not a drop in voltage. These are two completely different things.
     
  17. hiroshiy

    hiroshiy Active Member

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    Yeah, but just my guess UMC might watch drop in voltages which is one of the signs of overusage, and as a result, signal the S to reduce amps.
     
  18. yobigd20

    yobigd20 Well-Known Member

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    current, amps, voltage, yadda yadda whats the difference? (i guess it's a miracle I didn't kill myself during the self-install, hah!) actually i know just enough to get around. but current == amps right? e.g. current is measured in amps? man I need to brush up on my electrical knowledge. and watts is amps * volts, right? the one thing I never could wrap my head around is "what is more dangerous - current or voltage?" so to your question, i don't get what a "drop in current" would mean, as isn't that filtered by the individual breakers? and voltage drops a little depending on the distance of the run, hence the term "voltage drop" , but what does it mean if a power utility drops the "voltage" to your house by 8%? How do any electric items work if they are not getting the proper voltage (110/220?)
     
  19. brianstorms

    brianstorms Member

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    Related question:

    I have an electrician working on plans for installing a NEMA 14-50 in my condo's garage. My parking space will require about 120-150 feet of conduit back to the meter. What would be the ideal wire gauge that he should be using for the install?

    And, any sense of what the price difference might be to get a heavier gauge in case I ever wanna upgrade to a HPWC?
     
  20. cinergi

    cinergi Active Member

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    Yes they could drop voltage -- and if it drops far enough, the Model S will *stop* charging, not lower the amperage.
    And voltage drop is not what's happening given you can charge at 240 -- the power is coming from the same source. So again, the UMC (or one of its components / adapters), car, or plug is faulty.
     

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