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Ideas to get my new 200amp panel to pass inspection

Discussion in 'Model 3: Battery & Charging' started by pandam3, Aug 9, 2018.

  1. pandam3

    pandam3 Member

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    So recently I hired a licensed electrican to upgrade my 60’s 100 amp pushomatic panel to a 200 amp panel in the side yard wired to a 100 amp subpanel in the garage with dual nema 14-50 outlets on either side of the garage.

    The electrician got the location for the new panel approved for by the electric company. It’s in a spot on the back of the house with a door to access my patio in front of it.

    The distance in front of the panel to the door caused it to fail inspection... should be 36 inches, not 34 inches (panel sticks out vs the old one that was flush).

    I already know it’s the electrician’s issue to fix however I’m wondering if just removing that door off it’s hinge will solve the issue?

    838FCB43-06BC-451D-B3EC-C109EF374469.jpeg
     
  2. Need

    Need Active Member

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    I read that it is 36" frontal clearance, so if you take off the door it should work. But if that door is to the house, the inspector would know that you will put the door back as soon as inspection is done.... especially if you get the same inspector who failed you the first time.
     
  3. Dmagyar

    Dmagyar Member

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    Working space starts (clearance) at the surface of the enclosure, as in your case the "live parts" of your panelboard are enclosed (NEC 110-12). You've got further problems with the propane tank feeding whatever through the wall, is that a water heater? Also you' ve got to have 30" clear shoulder space in front of the panel, which with the rakes, shovels and propane tank you don't have. imho.
     
  4. Trevor B

    Trevor B Member

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    You probably need a redo
     
  5. pandam3

    pandam3 Member

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    Door leads to the patio... so it’s not part of the house and doesn’t lead into the house. So door doesn’t need to go back.

    The propane tank is just for a portable patio heater. It connects to a Mr Heater camping heater that we use to keep the patio warm during the winter. Again easy to remove if needed.

    Now as for 30 inches of shoulder space... is that on both sides of the panel? I can remove the rakes and stuff. The inspector didn’t note that on the report.

    He did note that he didn’t want it stuccoed either so he can inspect the install and he wanted the electrician there during the inspection before he started. Does the inspector think the electrician would wait at the house all day for him to show up? The inspector gives a range of time to show up... he was supposed to show up in the AM and actually showed up in the afternoon instead. And is it expected to leave it unstuccoed for the week prior to inspection and allow critters to get into my walls?

    The electrician is used by everyone in my neighborhood and comes highly recommended and has been working the area for decades. I guess he got too used to the previous inspector who has since retired around the time he finished my install.
     
  6. Dmagyar

    Dmagyar Member

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    The 30" is standing (shoulder space) in front of the panel. PS, the inspector is referred to as the authority having jurisdiction AHJ. Passing a inspection is part of any Licensed Contractors duties, when he/you pulled the permit that gave him (AHJ) power over passing or failing the install. If your Electrician doesn't want to hang around, the inspector is under no compulsion to pass the inspection. He's wanting to see what's inside the wall as, that's referred to as the rough in phase of construction, which you should have been brought up to speed on prior to finishing the stucco.
    PS if the job was over $500 including materials, (it was), then you needed an Licensed Electrical Contractor to do the install, most likely you wouldn't be having these problems. Not being snarky, but that's the short of it.
    If that was the case now, he'd be on the hook for fixing the situation, which is governed and enforced by the CSLB (Contractors State licensing Board).
     
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  7. pandam3

    pandam3 Member

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    Yeah he is a licensed electrtical contractor & he pulled to permit to get it inspected, that’s why the inspector said it’s all on the electrican’s shoulders to redo. Hopefully that also means I am off the hook for the stucco. The electrician arranged for the stucco through one of his other contractors that he does jobs with. If the panel needs to be moved then that means there’s a big hole to stucco over and new stucco to place for the new panel.
     
  8. Dmagyar

    Dmagyar Member

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    Good thing, you’re covered on the fix.
     
  9. ChrisMPK

    ChrisMPK Member

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    If the wall that the panel is on is framed with 2x4's then the panel is probably flush against the drywall on the back side - that would mean it probably can't be recessed any further. I think you can probably get away with taking the door and all the gardening tools out for the inspection and storing them in your garage. It's a pretty tickey-tack correction if everything else looks good.

    If the permit required inspection during the rough-in phase, that is something that your electrician should have been aware of and called for inspection at that time. If the permit called for that and he failed to get it inspected it is definitely his problem. It might be easier to cut the drywall on the back instead of cutting and patching the stucco. You or your electrician would know that better than us.
     
  10. Dr. J

    Dr. J Member

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    Does the panel have a meter hanging off the front of it? Isn't that unusual for a subpanel? Or do you now have two meters read by the electric company? I think the electrician needs to come up with a way to fix the problem he apparently created.
     

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