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Improving access to free charging via sponsorships

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by SeanTek, May 3, 2014.

  1. SeanTek

    SeanTek Member

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    I was just wondering how much Tesla owners/prospectives on this forum would be interested in improving access to fee-free charging stations in your respective areas, by sponsoring charger installations.

    Recently I came across this organization, Adopt-A-Charger, which is a non-profit. I am not affiliated--just wanted to see what you all thought about it (and the general premise).
     
  2. dirkhh

    dirkhh Middle-aged Member

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    For EVs to be long term successful the need to be valid business models around charging. The "free" Tesla superchargers are simply priced in. Similarly, free charging for new Leafs is just a marketing incentives.
    Philanthropy can not be the way to create adequate charging infrastructure.
     
  3. dsm363

    dsm363 Roadster + Sig Model S

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    I'd rather see more high power level 2 chargers in places like national parks that charge a minimal fee (enough to pay bills and maintenance costs) than free slow ones. Since parks aren't going anywhere, they don't need the immediate payback that some businesses look for when they install a 30A EVSE too. Make it credit card payment system too and ditch the ChargePoint and other networks.
     
  4. Ugliest1

    Ugliest1 S85: "Sparky"

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    Sun Country Highway's approach is to, well, approach businesses and explain to them how an EVSE will draw in the EV crowd to their location, and increase their sales of whatever (hotel, restaurant, 24-hour mart, etc). Their 100A (delivering 80A) and 90A (delivering 72A) are decent alternatives where there isn't a supercharger, and they don't cost all that much more than a 30A (delivering 24A). Most of the cost is usually the electrical infrastructure work.

    The cost of providing the actual electricity is negligible and amounts to a nuisance (IMO), especially if people shop in their business, and, it would likely be tax deductible anyway.
     
  5. dsm363

    dsm363 Roadster + Sig Model S

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    I'm using the SunCountry stations and they are wonderful. If free doesn't get them installed then at least offsetting the electricity cost would be great if that convinced a business to install one.
     
  6. martinwinlow

    martinwinlow Member

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    @Ugliest1 - "The cost of providing the actual electricity is negligible and amounts to a nuisance…" For Level I & II maybe but not for rapid chargers which can easily use $2 to $5-worth of power in a single sitting. OK, perhaps, for a multinational company - esp one promoting EVS or renewable energy - but not for a relatively small business. MW
     
  7. Ugliest1

    Ugliest1 S85: "Sparky"

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    @mw - ok, I take your point. I was thinking of it this way: how much value does a small business place on a single customer? How much would the average customer spend in the business? And therefore how much average profit is realized off each customer? A 100A Sun Country EVSE, delivering 80A continuous, would use 19kW in an hour, if I understand that correctly, for a Model S. That would price out to somewhere around $2-3 per hour at $.11-.15 per kWh. If the normal profit off the business' normal transactions is anything more than that, they're still ahead without having to ask the customer "Oh by the way, $2.43 extra for the charging". It becomes a goodwill gesture.

    In terms of nuisance, if the business charged $2 as a flat rate for a charge, I'd be happy to pay that -- the nuisance comes in with the measuring of electricity to the minute, calculating what the customer owes and having to find forty-three cents. If you know what I mean - it puts the charging in a whole different light, i.e. just a business transaction, no goodwill extended.

    Now, add to that, Leaf/Volt/Miev etc can't charge at the same rate as a Model S, so the electricity costs even less for them over the same time period, but the drivers would generally spend as much or more time (and therefore money, so the inference goes) in the business. And, add to that just the simple DRAW of customers -- those who would not normally stop at a business, are now drawn in. There's even a free map to the business, courtesy of Plugshare.

    Anyway, that was my thinking. But I've never run a small business, so I don't know the figures from that side of things.
     

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