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India joins the 'cryo club'

Discussion in 'SpaceX' started by gg_got_a_tesla, Jan 5, 2014.

  1. gg_got_a_tesla

    gg_got_a_tesla Model S: VIN P65513, Model 3 Res Holder

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    #1 gg_got_a_tesla, Jan 5, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 13, 2016
    GSLV GSAT-14 Launch Updates - SPACEFLIGHT101

    With this, India has joined the "cryo club", a select group of spacefaring nations having the crucial cryogenic engine technology that's necessary to carry heavy satellites. Countries with such a capability are the US, Russia, France, Japan and China.

    Not sure if India will place the GSLV-D5 in service for commercial launches outside of its own geostationary satellite launch needs but, it does have the potential to undercut the launch costs with Arianespace and, in the future, SpaceX.

     
  2. claytorj

    claytorj Member

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    Impressive launch after 2.5 years of not flying.

    Lots of information on the link you provided, but didn't find anything to indicate cost per launch. Are you just speculating, or do you have a source?

    Thanks.
     
  3. gg_got_a_tesla

    gg_got_a_tesla Model S: VIN P65513, Model 3 Res Holder

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  4. claytorj

    claytorj Member

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    Great, thanks for that. According to that article, this launch vehicle for India costs approx. $35 mil USD (Rs.220 crore) and can launch a satellite payload up to 2 tonnes. I don't know what market share of satellites that fit this spec are.

    From the article:
    For weight comparison, the Thaicom 6 Satellite that SpaceX is attempting to launch today weighs 3.3 tonnes, and the SES-8 Satellite that SpaceX launched on Dec. 3, 2013 weighed 3.1 tonnes.
     

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