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Induction vs. Gemini Ride Quality & Winter Driving

Owner's of the Performance Model Y currently have few options as far as all-season or winter tires for the staggered 21" Uberturbine wheels. In this configuration a wheel and tire package may be the only option.

You can purchase a wheel and winter tire package from Tesla (when it is in stock) or from TireRack, Discount Tire too. If you purchase a wheel and tire package then an additional expense is purchasing a set of (4) TPMS sensors for almost $400. If you have a place to store the wheels, tires off season then a wheel and winter tire package may be a good choice

Tesla Mobile Service can swap your wheels on your Tesla vehicle at your home location twice a year at minimum expense (this does not have to be done using Tesla wheels.) Couldn't be simpler. If you use the winter tires from November until April then your other set of tires should last twice as long.

Another option is to swap the tires on the existing wheels, some prefer this approach.

The better all-season tires such as the QuaTrac Pros are a reasonable compromise but if for example you planned on driving in the mountains or ski areas a set of winter tires would be the better choice.
Yeah - i made it a point years ago to have two sets of wheels. Never regretted it. But now with the Tesla - 😮😵‍💫 Crap the wheels are costly. I did find aftermarket ones - still no bargain though…. Actually looking forward to putting the winter Nokia’s Hakkapelitta 3 on ‘em…..
 
Yeah - i made it a point years ago to have two sets of wheels. Never regretted it. But now with the Tesla - 😮😵‍💫 Crap the wheels are costly. I did find aftermarket ones - still no bargain though…. Actually looking forward to putting the winter Nokia’s Hakkapelitta 3 on ‘em…..
Does Tesla sell the wheels separately or do you have to buy them as part of a package? The set on online is always out of stock.
 

Frenchrock

Just an American living his best Canadian life...
Jul 7, 2021
130
309
Ottawa, ON
I can confirm that the stock Goodyear fake all seasons on the inductions are absolutely terrible in snow and ice. It's best to get proper winter rated all seasons or separate wheels with true snows. The latter is what I did.
Looking at doing the latter myself. Picked the MY up just two weekends ago (Black on Black, 20" inductions) but looking to switch to 18" or 19" winters here in Canada. Saw your post re: switching to the 18" Blizzaks. Still recommended after getting a winter in with them?

Any issues with the car calibrating to the 18s?
 
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There's quite a bit of conversation happening in this thread but to break it down into some relevant parts:
  • Snow tires are built for winter use and their tread compounds are stickier in cold temps - stickier on pavement, stickier on ice, stickier on packed snow
  • Snow conditions are way more variable than dry/wet paved roads or, for the most part, dirt roads
  • Snow tires need to vent slush and soft snow much the same way conventional tires need to vent water. Control is lost if the tire tread cannot handle moving snow/slush out of the way
  • Smaller profiles generally do better in snow. This tire profile may not get the aesthetic points of a larger setup, but the smaller/narrower tire works better for traction
  • Some winter tires are studded or are set up for studs. Studs work great on ice and hard pack, cold snow. But they are loud on dry pavement and not suitable (at all) for summer driving. I've driven both studded snow tires and snow tires without, I prefer without. The rubber compounds, siping and tread design of well designed winter tires provide similar traction as studded snows. But, if you like the absolute grip of a studded snow tire, go forward without shame
  • Speaking of siping - Siping is like suction on icy, snow-packed roads. Not the excessive-test-the-corner type suction but a very comfortable we-can-drive-50mph on this snow packed road comfort. It's on most snow tire designs and is pretty darn useful. You can tell when your snow tires are worn, the siping is less effective
  • Speaking of worn - if you are swapping snow for summer (and vice-versa), your purchase investment will last longer. Where I live in Colorado, I switch from snow to summer in May and then back to winter treads in November. That's 6 months on, 6 months off which means I'm only driving 1/2 the mileage on each set. Tires are still a significant expense but, once you make your initial double-purchase, you're set for longer than you expect
  • Many owners in my area buy cheaper steel wheels for their snow tires (pretty plain looking) but it makes changing out easier on the wallet (considering many people can swap their own) and easier on the wheel and tire if one is swapping rubber onto a common rim/wheel. Our CDoT uses magnesium chloride (sprayed as a liquid) for ice/snow melt. It works really well but is tough on metals as well as the environment. If you swap rubber on a common wheel a lot, I've found the wheels need a lot of examination for corrosion and preparation before remounting. The corrosion on the wheel where it contacts the bead will provide for a slow leak effect if the tires and wheels are not properly prepped. Separate wheel/tire combos help with this. I would assume a standard salting of the roads would affect wheels the same as MgCl2
+ Thank you for paying attention - there will be a quiz following this post. As for the comparison of Induction vs. Gemini wheels, I've no opinion. ;)
 
Looking at doing the latter myself. Picked the MY up just two weekends ago (Black on Black, 20" inductions) but looking to switch to 18" or 19" winters here in Canada. Saw your post re: switching to the 18" Blizzaks. Still recommended after getting a winter in with them?

Any issues with the car calibrating to the 18s?
I didn't bother. I checked my speed with GPS and it was only off a mph or two. So I didn't do anything on the screen in terms of wheel calibration. And the stock bluetooth TPMS sensors installed by tire rack sync'd right up. I can definitely recommend it.
 
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Frenchrock

Just an American living his best Canadian life...
Jul 7, 2021
130
309
Ottawa, ON
There's quite a bit of conversation happening in this thread but to break it down into some relevant parts:
  • Snow tires are built for winter use and their tread compounds are stickier in cold temps - stickier on pavement, stickier on ice, stickier on packed snow
  • Snow conditions are way more variable than dry/wet paved roads or, for the most part, dirt roads
  • Snow tires need to vent slush and soft snow much the same way conventional tires need to vent water. Control is lost if the tire tread cannot handle moving snow/slush out of the way
  • Smaller profiles generally do better in snow. This tire profile may not get the aesthetic points of a larger setup, but the smaller/narrower tire works better for traction
  • Some winter tires are studded or are set up for studs. Studs work great on ice and hard pack, cold snow. But they are loud on dry pavement and not suitable (at all) for summer driving. I've driven both studded snow tires and snow tires without, I prefer without. The rubber compounds, siping and tread design of well designed winter tires provide similar traction as studded snows. But, if you like the absolute grip of a studded snow tire, go forward without shame
  • Speaking of siping - Siping is like suction on icy, snow-packed roads. Not the excessive-test-the-corner type suction but a very comfortable we-can-drive-50mph on this snow packed road comfort. It's on most snow tire designs and is pretty darn useful. You can tell when your snow tires are worn, the siping is less effective
  • Speaking of worn - if you are swapping snow for summer (and vice-versa), your purchase investment will last longer. Where I live in Colorado, I switch from snow to summer in May and then back to winter treads in November. That's 6 months on, 6 months off which means I'm only driving 1/2 the mileage on each set. Tires are still a significant expense but, once you make your initial double-purchase, you're set for longer than you expect
  • Many owners in my area buy cheaper steel wheels for their snow tires (pretty plain looking) but it makes changing out easier on the wallet (considering many people can swap their own) and easier on the wheel and tire if one is swapping rubber onto a common rim/wheel. Our CDoT uses magnesium chloride (sprayed as a liquid) for ice/snow melt. It works really well but is tough on metals as well as the environment. If you swap rubber on a common wheel a lot, I've found the wheels need a lot of examination for corrosion and preparation before remounting. The corrosion on the wheel where it contacts the bead will provide for a slow leak effect if the tires and wheels are not properly prepped. Separate wheel/tire combos help with this. I would assume a standard salting of the roads would affect wheels the same as MgCl2
+ Thank you for paying attention - there will be a quiz following this post. As for the comparison of Induction vs. Gemini wheels, I've no opinion. ;)
Excellent!

...but obvious concerns re: said quiz. How many points do I get for spelling my name correctly? :oops:
 
Thanks everyone for your advice. I'm thinking since neither tire is very good in the snow and I prefer the look of the 20"s, I'll get the 20"s as a summer set of wheels and then get a winter set of wheels. Maybe I'll see if I can pick up a set of the 19" Tesla wheels used and put snow tires on them. We drive over a pretty significant pass in the winter that is steep and snowy in the winter. If we have two sets of wheels, I'll ideally have the best of both worlds and can swap them out anywhere vs. swapping just the tires like I have been doing which requires a trip to the tire shop.
My $.02, get the wheels you want (20" Inductions) and upgrade the OEM tires to improve snow performance and ride quality. Upon delivery I swapped out the OEM 255/40/20 Goodyear's with 265/40/20 Pilot Sport AS4's, one size up to fill out the wheel well, improve curb rash protection, improve snow performance and add some more sidewall for a more comfortable ride. IMO the 19" Gemini's don't do the car justice, too much wheel well, and personally, paying $55K+ for car with hubcaps (ok, you can call them wheel covers 😎) would be tough to swallow. And I don't get spending $1k on powder coating Gemini's when you can get the Inductions for $2k and correct any shortcomings with tire selection. IMO, the look with Inductions and the right tires can't be beat...
 

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IMO the 19" Gemini's don't do the car justice, too much wheel well, and personally, paying $55K+ for car with hubcaps (ok, you can call them wheel covers 😎) would be tough to swallow.

@Scott2002 yeah I had a hard time getting over the hubcap thing too, though I have now. But for your other argument regarding wheel well: the wheel well spacing should be identical between the 19" and 20" factory options, as they have the same overall diameter (they just vary a half inch in sidewall):

1631121587491.png
 
I started a thread on this. White glove service here in Seattle runs about $250 per wheel. This is drop off car and pick up within 48 hours with everything done, so wheel removal, tire removal, tire remount / rebalance, and wheel install.

If you’re willing to do the work to drop off bare wheels and are patient, it is closer to $500 plus the cost to remount and rebalance. I’m planning to got this route next month when I swap to winter tires.

Jim
$1000 to swap tires? Uh no.

Don't understand the next scenario"...drop off bare wheels"..."$500 plus the cost to remount and rebalance". What are you actually accomplishing here? Do you mean drop off snow tires and they'll shuck your all seasons / summers and mount the snow tires?

These prices are truly insane, they are 100% preying on people with more money than sense.
 
$1000 to swap tires? Uh no.

Don't understand the next scenario"...drop off bare wheels"..."$500 plus the cost to remount and rebalance". What are you actually accomplishing here? Do you mean drop off snow tires and they'll shuck your all seasons / summers and mount the snow tires?

These prices are truly insane, they are 100% preying on people with more money than sense.
Did you read the thread? This is the cost of powder coating the wheels. The wheel places that offer turnkey service (I.e drop off car, pick up and drive off) are ~$250 per wheel. If you take the wheels and tires off and drop the wheels at the powder coater it’s about $125-150 per wheel.
 
Did you read the thread? This is the cost of powder coating the wheels. The wheel places that offer turnkey service (I.e drop off car, pick up and drive off) are ~$250 per wheel. If you take the wheels and tires off and drop the wheels at the powder coater it’s about $125-150 per wheel.
I did read the thread - nowhere in your post did it mention powdercoating but that makes a bit more sense!
 
My $.02, get the wheels you want (20" Inductions) and upgrade the OEM tires to improve snow performance and ride quality. Upon delivery I swapped out the OEM 255/40/20 Goodyear's with 265/40/20 Pilot Sport AS4's, one size up to fill out the wheel well, improve curb rash protection, improve snow performance and add some more sidewall for a more comfortable ride. IMO the 19" Gemini's don't do the car justice, too much wheel well, and personally, paying $55K+ for car with hubcaps (ok, you can call them wheel covers 😎) would be tough to swallow. And I don't get spending $1k on powder coating Gemini's when you can get the Inductions for $2k and correct any shortcomings with tire selection. IMO, the look with Inductions and the right tires can't be beat...
I’m debating between the Quatrac Pros and the Michelin Pilot Sport AS4s, only concern is for the Michelins will handle New England snow/winters…have you used them through the winter yet?
 
AS are really 3 seasons. They all turn to hockey pucks when the temperature is near freezing.
In my previous vehicles, the all seasons that came on the car worked fine for me. My last car (Audi SQ5) had Pirelli Scorpion Verde (20”) and they were fine so hoping the Quatrac Pro or Pilot AS4s are equivalent.

But these Goodyear Eagle F1s are def a sport AS tire.…
 
Hello,

I'm planning to order a Y and can't decide between the wheels. The induction wheels obviously look way cooler but I'm concerned about the hit in range, how they drive in the snow (we drive into the Rockies quite frequently) and how rough are they off road. Does anyone have any experience with this? Curious how the 20s do in the snow and on moderate dirt roads.

Thanks!
I plan to do 18" wheels even for the summer so i may have some stock 19's for sale soon.. would anyone be interested, esp in denver area?
 

TwelveVoltMan

He'll make sparks fly round your head
May 14, 2021
171
226
Raleigh, NC
AS are really 3 seasons. They all turn to hockey pucks when the temperature is near freezing.
That has not been my experience on numerous sets of ultra high performance all season tires like the Continental DSW series or the Michelin Pilot Sport AS. They are not as good as a winter tire in ice and snow, but they do decently well in cold weather. Summer tires (on the other hand) begin losing grip as the temperature drops.
 
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