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Inexpensive bike/cargo mat for Model S

Discussion in 'Model S: Interior & Exterior' started by thecloud, Feb 14, 2016.

  1. thecloud

    thecloud As rhythm raced inside, the ship came alive

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    #1 thecloud, Feb 14, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2016
    Previous threads have discussed options for protecting the cargo area, especially the folded rear seat backs, when transporting bikes. The WeatherTech trunk mat doesn't extend to cover the seat backs, and padded cargo liners need hooks or supports so they don't slide around. I was looking for something that would protect the carpet and seat backs from dirt and grease on the bikes, as well as keeping them from getting ripped up by sprockets and pedals. The mat should be sturdy, trap water and mud, grip the carpet to keep from sliding around, and be easily removed. To cover the cargo area, it should be 3 feet wide and at least 5 feet long.

    I did some checking online and discovered that Home Depot sold a mat with those dimensions for less than $20 -- a commercial door mat, not a cargo mat. Today, I tried out this mat with our bikes for the first time, and it actually worked great. I also ended up getting two $16 diamond-pattern foam mats to use as full-time trunk mats.

    Ingredients:
    - (1) 36"x60" TrafficMASTER commercial door mat
    - (2) 36"x24" TrafficMASTER anti-fatigue floor mats

    I started by placing one of the 24x36 mats over the folded rear seat backs, with the edge hanging over the seat base into the trunk area. The other 24x36 mat sits up against it in the middle of the trunk. Then I unrolled the large 36x60 doormat, overlapping the foam mat and the rear seat base, and leaving a foot or so hanging outside to protect the liftgate sill.

    TxfZFyu.jpg

    This turns out to be very useful, as the bike can be temporarily rested on the liftgate opening without worrying about scratches. I can then tilt the bike sideways and maneuver it back into the car without having the mat bunch up underneath it.


    tuvhqtj.jpg

    Removing the front wheel of my wife's bike is a pain, so fortunately I don't have to do that. The entire bike just fits with the wheel angled so the liftgate can close over it. I placed a towel between the rear wheel and the side of the car so there wouldn't be any contact.


    6fnxgvT.jpg

    After both bikes are in place, the bottom of the mat folds in over the bottom part of the wheels, and away we go.


    CG2SwIY.jpg

    The diamond-pattern anti-fatigue mats work well by themselves as trunk mats.

    Pros:
    - Inexpensive. You can spend $200 on the Tesla rear trunk mats and they won't cover the back of the rear seat. This set of 3 mats set me back $52.
    - Lightweight but sturdy. Gets the job done.
    - Much better protection than throwing a blanket down over the seats, or using nothing at all. "Nothing at all..."

    Cons:
    - The large doormat initially had a strong rubber smell, as if its backing was made from recycled tires, which is probably the case. I purchased the mat about a month ago and left it sitting in the garage, after which the smell has mostly dissipated. Was worried this smell might be unpleasant when driving with all the windows closed, but turned out it wasn't even noticeable. So you might just need to air the mat out a bit before use.
    - Doesn't cover the sides of the trunk. This isn't really a big problem with the bikes, but I have to be somewhat careful that I don't accidentally scrape a pedal against plastic interior surfaces. Towels come in handy here. (They always do.)
     
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  2. Hotlobstah

    Hotlobstah Member

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    I saw that and it's a good, cost effective idea. I have a fat bike (which is quite a monster)and was hoping there was a prefabricated large liner specifically for bike transport that would offer some protection to the interior sides of the trunk and rear of the front seats. For instance if Weathertech took their trunk liner and extended it to the front seats then extended the lip(around 12"?) to protect the sides of the interior and rear of the front seats from dings and capture debris.
     
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  3. Xenius

    Xenius Member

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    Been looking for somethign like this. Happy to see a useful old post get bumped.
     
  4. eschummer

    eschummer Member

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    This is great! My son and I both ride and sometimes we take two road bikes to rather distant places for a race. I presume after you have the two bikes in there is still enough space for all your other gear, helmets, shoes, food, liquides, etc. ?
     
  5. thecloud

    thecloud As rhythm raced inside, the ship came alive

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    Yes, all the gear (helmets, shoes, water bottles, packs, etc.) goes on the floor between the front and rear seats, or sometimes in the frunk.

    Haven't had any concern about dinging the rear of the front seats, as there's lots of room and the bikes never get close to touching them. The points where I have to watch out are the plastic parcel shelf rails (easy to hit with a stray pedal or forks), and the sides of the rear seats (the part which doesn't fold down, where the shoulder belts rest when they're not being worn.) As part of my routine, immediately after folding down the rear seats, I take a black bath-size towel and hook it through the metal loop where the rear seat latches. This covers and protects those side areas where the rear wheel is most likely to press against the upholstery.
     
  6. kort677

    kort677 Active Member

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    a sheet of tyvek like material works well for me
     
  7. Xenius

    Xenius Member

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    Just finally ordered both of these @thecloud after being reminded when you linked from the other accessories thread. Will pick them up after work today. Cheers.
     
  8. The805

    The805 Member

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    I'm curious, what did you find are the benefits of having the 36x24 mats in addition to the longer 36x60 mat? It seems like the anti-fatigue mats are somewhat redundant.
     
  9. thecloud

    thecloud As rhythm raced inside, the ship came alive

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    If you look at the first picture I posted, you'll see that one of the 36x24 mats is actually covering the seat backs. The 36x60 mat, by itself, is not long enough to reach the seat backs. It just barely goes over the lip where the seats fold down.

    The second 36x24 mat is somewhat redundant, but it provides extra protection underneath the center of the cargo area. That's where the edge of the pedal presses into the mat, so it's good to have a double thickness there. I like the spongy, non-slip quality of these mats. The bikes stay put and don't slide around.
     
  10. thecloud

    thecloud As rhythm raced inside, the ship came alive

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    #10 thecloud, Nov 4, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2016
    Nice! These have worked out well for me but I'm curious to hear about your experience with them. Plus, you can always use them as floor mats in your garage! ;)
     

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