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Inside tire wear problem sends my Model S in for service

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by STxTesla, Aug 25, 2013.

  1. STxTesla

    STxTesla Sig #1278

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    266
    Location:
    Corpus Christi, Texas
    I was parked at a shopping center parking lot and a couple of people pulled up next to me as I was leaving and told me that my rear tire looked really low. I got out to check it out and it did seem a little low...not flat...but I thought that it would be a good idea to check it out. There is a tire repair center near where I was so I drove over to have it checked. The tire pressure on the passenger rear tire was 10 psi. I had the tech pull the tire off to check for leaks. The tech found two places that were leaking air and showed me some very significant wear on the inside of my rear passenger side tire. The places leaking were in the worn area of the inside side wall of the tire, (the tread was visible all around the inside wall where the wear had been taking place), and in a place near the inside rim of my 21 inch wheels. He said that I probably could make it home so I drove straight home.

    I called Tesla service and the Houston service center will be picking up my car on Tuesday to check out the issue. The wear that exists could have eventually resulted in a blow out so...I thought I would start this post to bring some safety to the table. I don't know what caused the wear on the inside wall of the tire or if the wear was caused by running with a low psi. The Model S has a warning system that alerts the driver of low tire pressure but I had received false low pressure warnings in the past. Tesla picked up my car (at their request) a few months ago to update some items and said that they corrected the low pressure warning issue. Within a few days of receiving my car from the service center I started getting the low tire warning again....so....I don't know if the tire had been run on low pressure for a long period of time or not.

    So my objective here is not to complain...but to warn other owners to check their tire pressures to ensure that they do not cause tire wear that could result in a potentially serious tire blow out. I hope that this post helps both Tesla and Tesla owners to achieve the maximum safety that the car can provide. I will keep everyone posted on the results of what is discovered by Tesla service.

    BTW....I absolutely love my Tesla Model S!!
     
  2. goneskiian

    goneskiian Active Member

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  3. Kaivball

    Kaivball Member

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    There have been multiple threads on this.

    The S runs negative rear camber that exasperates the inside tire wear.

    How many miles on the tires? Conti or Michelin?

    If you have a toe misalignment the tires can be worn out as fast as 6,000 miles.
    Properly aligned they last 12-15k miles.
     
  4. texex91

    texex91 Banned

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    Also, 19 or 21" tires? And as asked--miles and brand pls.
     
  5. STxTesla

    STxTesla Sig #1278

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    I need to get back into reading the forum more often! I didn't realize that this was a common issue....I guess that I will have to get new tires more often than I originally thought.
    I have 8017 miles on my car and the tires are 21 inch Continentals.
     
  6. dsm363

    dsm363 Roadster + Sig Model S

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    Yeah, after I first got the Roadster and found out the rears only lasted around 7,000 miles I learned what performance tires meant. Did you rotate the tires yet? That would have added a few thousand more miles. With these tires you really need to get a digital tire gauge and check your tires (inside and outside tread) every thousand miles or so (especially once you get above 5,000 miles or so) to be safe.
     

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