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Inverter alternative for Teslas

Discussion in 'Roadster' started by zack, Sep 29, 2011.

  1. zack

    zack Member

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    Since Tesla is about to release a manual update that includes instructions NOT to use inverters with the car (I learned this the hard way... my car wouldn't start and had to be transported to Chicago for repair), I started looking for alternatives and found this for $240.

    I just got mine, with a spare battery. It's very reasonably priced and it's completely amazing! It doesn't like inductive loads very much at high wattage (it balked a bit at a high-powered fan) but it's happy powering everything else. True sine-wave so it's just like wall power. It even powered up my 1966 Marshall JTM45 Super Tremolo amplifier and, at top volume with a Les Paul guitar, only sagged to 115VAC from 120VAC start point. It has enough power to light a 100W light bulb for an hour and twenty minutes, and only weighs 3.5 lbs. Battery swapping is instant. The batteries will charge off the charger or can be charged separately since they have an identical connector on them. I can't say enough about this thing. It's US made (components from various countries). My spare battery was $90. 260 watt hours (with the spare) of clean, buzz-free 120VAC power at 120Watts continuous and it sneaks right between the seats. I'm absolutely delighted!

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  2. zack

    zack Member

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    There's a 240VAC version for Euro Tesla owners as well.
     
  3. Tommy

    Tommy Member

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    I have to ask, has Tesla given it's official "ok to use" for this alternative. Maybe I am being a stickler or a bit paranoid about Tesla, but after reading your ordeal getting warranty coverage for using an inverter in the 12v accessory socket of your Roadster, I don't want to read a post about a repeat of what just happened to you.
     
  4. PopSmith

    PopSmith Saving for a Model 3

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    The inverter zack linked to doesn't run off the car's 12V battery, it runs off it's own battery.

    vm120_battery_1210.jpg
     
  5. zack

    zack Member

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    Yep, that's the key to solving the problem. This fix is completely isolated from the car. It's perfect. Tons of power, small, light, fits between the seats... you won't need to risk causing problems with the car's DC system by connecting noisy inverters. Plus it's pure sine wave which means every type of accessory you connect to it will see "wall current" just like you're at home.

    Let me simplify. This box is a home outlet with a battery connected to it. It's a way of bringing a 120VAC outlet from your house directly into the car, in a box. It doesn't connect to the car. It is a "remote outlet." It's got so much power inside it that you can plug in a lamp with a 60W light bulb and it will power it for 2 hours straight. You'll never connect this thing to your Tesla. You'll simply use this thing to plug in any device that needs 120VAC power. Anything you'd normally plug in at home. Well, as long as it's below 200 watts or so. So, no hair-dryers. But you don't need a hair-dryer in the Tesla. It has a hair-dryer built-in. It's called the heat.
     
  6. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    Speaking of heat, with it wedged between the seats does it get too hot when running?
     
  7. Tommy

    Tommy Member

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    So as I understand you Zack, you have no intention to plug into Tesla's outlet; however IF someone did, would it be ok with Tesla.
     
  8. zack

    zack Member

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    Service has assured me that small dc-dc devices such as cell phone chargers are fine to plug into the socket. My girlfriend has an iPhone charger with a lighter plug, and I won't hesitate to let her charge her phone using the Tesla's 12VDC socket. All of my personal chargers are 120VAC types so I'll use the Vagabond which can charge my iPhone or any of my small video cameras 40 times (with its spare battery) and I'll recharge the Vagabond while charging the car.

    I am not sure how the new manual addendum will read. I'm only sure of three rules regarding the Tesla's 12VDC lighter socket.
    1] Nothing over 125 Watts.
    2] Nothing over 10 Amps.
    3] No inverters at all. (Which is why I am so delighted to have this new thing.)
     
  9. zack

    zack Member

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    Not so far! Even when powering my Marshall amp near 200 watts it took several minutes for it's internal fan to kick in. The vents all face sideways, so they're pointed into the spaces behind the seats. That gives it near-perfect ventilation. The bottom of the Vagabond sits against the back wall just like it's sitting on a table. The meter faces up so I can check battery charge. It slides in and out smoothly for battery changes. It's black so it blends in.
     
  10. W.Petefish

    W.Petefish Active Member

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    Cool gonna have to get me one.
     

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