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Is cord of Wall Connector damaged by garage door closing on it?

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by WSE51, Dec 3, 2018.

  1. WSE51

    WSE51 Member

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    Sometimes one of the family's Teslas winds up getting charged outside our garage, and the Wall Connector is inside. That means the garage door closes on top of the charging cable, which is lying completely flat on the concrete. The is a slight intention in the thick insulation on the cable from the weight of the garage door, or the force of it closing.

    Has anyone had experience with this issue and does the cable get damaged over time?

    The other options each have issues
    ---> we could put a block of wood down before closing the door but over time stopping early might damage the garage door mechanism
    --> we could try to remember to stop the garage door from closing all the day, not sure that's practical and that might also eventually harm the mechanism.
     
  2. Eevee

    Eevee Member

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    I'm curious about this too because there are times I may need to park in the driveway instead of the garage. One obvious solution is to install in outlet outside. But that's more money than it's probably worth.
     
  3. ucmndd

    ucmndd Active Member

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    I charge like this frequently. Been two years and 65,000 miles, no problems yet. I usually back the garage door off a bit, raising it an inch or so and stopping it there, but not always.
     
  4. Lon12

    Lon12 Member

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    I have three cars and only two fit in the garage so one is always charging outside. I've done my best to adjust the garage door down stop so there isn't too much pressure and place the cord where the weather strip seems to be the thickest. The corners seem to have the least clearance probably because the garage floor is not flat. Cord seems to be handling it ok.
     
  5. MP3Mike

    MP3Mike Well-Known Member

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    You really shouldn't close the door on the cable, the compression can damage it.

    I have seen people cut little channels in the concrete for the cable to run in so it doesn't get squished.
     
  6. boaterva

    boaterva Supporting Member

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    All this depends on how your door is adjusted. No one here can answer this. If it’s adjusted ‘too’ tight or the reversing/opening sensors are too tight, it can crush the cable. The other way and there’s either room for the cable or hitting the cable will make it reopen.

    How could we answer how your door is set up? Find your door’s (opener’s) manual and set it to leave an inch at the bottom if this is something you need to do all the time (charge outside, etc.) or devise another way for the cable to get outside.
     
  7. Birdman325

    Birdman325 Member

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    I put a small piece of wood under the door. The door closes on the wood and leaves just enough of a gap so that the charging cable is not impacted.
     
  8. Barry

    Barry Active Member

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    Or you could buy one of those plastic runners you see at conventions to cover/protect the cable.

    If the door comes down hard, it could damage the insulation on the wires.
     
  9. Rocky_H

    Rocky_H Active Member

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    How do you think garage doors sense when to stop? That is how they are made to function. They sense the increased resistance against the motor operation when it presses against the cement floor and it stops the motor. That's what it does every time it closes, so stopping against blocks of wood an inch sooner isn't really any different.
     
    • Disagree x 1
  10. Eevee

    Eevee Member

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    That made me think... My garage has a flooring material. It's recycled rubber, like what you might see in a gym. So maybe just cutting a groove in that would work. Seems like that could be a cheaper,easier option for some people than cutting into concrete.
     
    • Like x 1
  11. Brass Guy

    Brass Guy Active Member

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    No, there are set points for the top and bottom. If it detects a certain amount of resistance before it gets to the closed position, it stops and then opens by itself.

    Resetting the bottom stop position is probably the easiest thing to do, but then the door will always be open a crack.
    IMO a groove is the optimal solution.
     
    • Like x 2
  12. Rocky_H

    Rocky_H Active Member

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    Oh yeah, I was mixing that up. I was thinking of the reverse sensors. They detect a spike in the motor current when it hits too much resistance from an obstruction and auto-raises the door, but that's separate than just the stop position.
     
  13. davewill

    davewill Active Member

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    My door has a thick rubber seal at the bottom, thick enough that the cord compresses it, but the weight of the door doesn't end up on the cord. I would never cut any sort of groove as that creates a path for critters to get in. If I really needed to do this on a regular basis, I'd probably install a wall passthough for the cable or bite the bullet and install outside. However I've only done this in a handful of emergency cases.
     

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