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Is Gen 3 wall connector best Tesla has for home charging?

h2ofun

Active Member
Aug 11, 2020
3,106
685
auburn, ca
So, looks like the Gen 3 will support up to 4 units? Seems running a 100 amp subpanel, and then 60 amp lines to each Gen 3 unit?

I believe I just read that Tesla has come out with a unit that has the non tesla plug. I assume there is an adapter to use with Tesla?
What is the cord lengths? Under the impression the newer unit is longer than 18 feet, like 23 feet?

Was interesting reading that some with multi have issues with max charge if another is plugged in even if not charging? Bug or feature?
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
7,093
8,720
Boise, ID
I believe I just read that Tesla has come out with a unit that has the non tesla plug.
It's a J1772 plug handle, which is the standard that all other brands of electric cars use, so that's what at most public charging stations.
I assume there is an adapter to use with Tesla?
Yes, and every Tesla car comes with one included, so you don't have to go buy it.
Was interesting reading that some with multi have issues with max charge if another is plugged in even if not charging? Bug or feature?
Feature. The one with the J1772 handle is built to only supply 40A maximum, while the standard ones with the Tesla handle can do 48A. So they built the J1772 ones to only be able to share with others that also have that 40A limit.
 
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miimura

Well-Known Member
Aug 21, 2013
6,710
6,557
Los Altos, CA
Feature. The one with the J1772 handle is built to only supply 40A maximum, while the standard ones with the Tesla handle can do 48A. So they built the J1772 ones to only be able to share with others that also have that 40A limit.
The J1772 Wall Connector is a Gen2 unit that uses the wired Power Sharing system. All Gen2 Power Sharing nodes must have the same circuit capacity regardless of whether they have a J1772 cable or Tesla cable. In theory, Tesla could have forced you to dial down the 80A capable Gen2 Wall Connector to 40A and then allow sharing with the J1772 Wall Connector, but they chose not to do that.

Personally, I feel that the Gen3 Power Sharing system is much better since each node can define its own circuit capacity and they can share a different aggregate supply limit (ie. 2 x 50A + 2 x 60A sharing 100A). Gen2 can only take a single circuit capacity and divide that among the nodes (ie. 4 x 60A sharing 60A).
 

h2ofun

Active Member
Aug 11, 2020
3,106
685
auburn, ca
The J1772 Wall Connector is a Gen2 unit that uses the wired Power Sharing system. All Gen2 Power Sharing nodes must have the same circuit capacity regardless of whether they have a J1772 cable or Tesla cable. In theory, Tesla could have forced you to dial down the 80A capable Gen2 Wall Connector to 40A and then allow sharing with the J1772 Wall Connector, but they chose not to do that.

Personally, I feel that the Gen3 Power Sharing system is much better since each node can define its own circuit capacity and they can share a different aggregate supply limit (ie. 2 x 50A + 2 x 60A sharing 100A). Gen2 can only take a single circuit capacity and divide that among the nodes (ie. 4 x 60A sharing 60A).
So, what are you thoughts? My first goal will be to install a 100amp subpanel in my 5 car garage. Then I seem to have some choices. One would be to drive 60 amp lines to each of these possible 5 car locations. (I do want to get permits for all of this, so ideally do it once with the ability to modify things down the road if needed. And since I have no EV's today, this is just planning for the future, whether it is me, or next person to own the house)

Seems one option is to buy Gen 3 charges, and hardwire them as I believe is the only way to install. The other is to just run the wiring to each of these 4 or 5 places, push extra wire into the walls, and place outlets at each spot. (If I do this, what is best outlet to install).. This way it would seem I could pass code, and not have to buy the Gen 3 charges now, and wait until I ever need, and get any updated technology that might get developed?
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
7,093
8,720
Boise, ID
The J1772 Wall Connector is a Gen2 unit that uses the wired Power Sharing system.
Oh, right, I knew that from talking about it in other threads, but had a brain lapse and forgot about it just now for some reason.
Personally, I feel that the Gen3 Power Sharing system is much better since each node can define its own circuit capacity and they can share a different aggregate supply limit (ie. 2 x 50A + 2 x 60A sharing 100A). Gen2 can only take a single circuit capacity and divide that among the nodes (ie. 4 x 60A sharing 60A).
Yes, agree. It can be more cost effective use of wiring in that kind of situation, too, not having to wire every one with the maximum wire size of the main one.
 

h2ofun

Active Member
Aug 11, 2020
3,106
685
auburn, ca
Oh, right, I knew that from talking about it in other threads, but had a brain lapse and forgot about it just now for some reason.

Yes, agree. It can be more cost effective use of wiring in that kind of situation, too, not having to wire every one with the maximum wire size of the main one.
My thoughts would always be to attempt to run 60 amp wiring if it fits, since the extra cost in material is minor compared to labor
 

miimura

Well-Known Member
Aug 21, 2013
6,710
6,557
Los Altos, CA
So, what are you thoughts? My first goal will be to install a 100amp subpanel in my 5 car garage. Then I seem to have some choices. One would be to drive 60 amp lines to each of these possible 5 car locations. (I do want to get permits for all of this, so ideally do it once with the ability to modify things down the road if needed. And since I have no EV's today, this is just planning for the future, whether it is me, or next person to own the house)

Seems one option is to buy Gen 3 charges, and hardwire them as I believe is the only way to install. The other is to just run the wiring to each of these 4 or 5 places, push extra wire into the walls, and place outlets at each spot. (If I do this, what is best outlet to install).. This way it would seem I could pass code, and not have to buy the Gen 3 charges now, and wait until I ever need, and get any updated technology that might get developed?
Your plan is good. Pull 60A wiring to each charging station location. If you can manage 125A to the sub-panel that might be better than 100A.

One problem you might run into is getting an inspector to sign off on this setup if you don't have all the Wall Connectors installed at the time of inspection. This installation is only allowed if you have power sharing hardware present. For example, if you install 2 x 60A wall connectors and 3 x NEMA 14-50 outlets you won't pass because the NEMA outlets alone can overload the sub-panel because they don't qualify for the special power sharing load calculation. However, you might pass if you stub the wires and just put a blank cover on the boxes that are not used. Terminating the unused wires at a breaker in the panel may or may not be allowed.
 
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