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Is it possible to install a 400VDC/200A sub for local quickcharging?

Discussion in 'North America' started by tgt, Jan 20, 2014.

  1. tgt

    tgt New Member

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    Just curious, I have access to equipment required to produce this voltage/amperage (manga 100kw 400VDC) and was wondering if it is possible to run a quickcharge-like system at my business (which consequentially also has $0.04/kW industrial rates). Would using this as a primary system for charging damage the longevity of the electrical system? I know there is a handshake that has to happen between the car to get it to work, and I have documentation for this as well as that for the DC supply and am confident in making it work.

    Has anybody succeeded in this?

    Thanks.
     
  2. GSP

    GSP Member

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    I suggest buying a UL listed DC fast charge station from Eaton, or AeroVironment, or others.

    If you want to "roll your own" DC fast charger with your existing programmable DC power supply, you will need to buy copies of the latest CHAdeMo specification, and/or the Society of Automotive Engineers J1772 Recommended Practice. From these you can design the necessary communications hardware and software.

    GSP
     
  3. techmaven

    techmaven Active Member

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    If you are in the U.S., which I assume you are because you used $/kWh, the situation is that at the moment, no one other than Tesla has the necessary equipment to charge a Model S with 400 volt DC fast charging. At some point, we expect Tesla to ship the CHAdeMO adapter and at that point, you can buy a CHAdeMO EVSE and do a DC fast charge.

    The problem then becomes the cost of the CHAdeMO EVSE. Fuji has a presentation that shows their 25 kW Fuji Electric Gen 3 DC Quick Charger costs $25,000. The 50kW version is $35k to $60k. You'll want 480v 3 phase input. Install cost is expected to be at least $20k. Nissan does subsidize some CHAdeMO chargers including one that starts at $10k.

    You could reverse engineer the Tesla Supercharging protocol, as it should be based on SAE J1772-DC. Maybe one day Tesla will announce a J1772-DC/CCS adapter, which should be cheaper than the CHAdeMO adapter. But no signs of that yet. Even then, the pricing is likely way too high to be feasible. Instead, 80A J1772 or a Tesla HPWC is far more cost effective.
     
  4. Seattle

    Seattle Member

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    Simplifying all that great detail, in the US the only DC charging for Tesla Model S at your own place is Chademo-charger + tesla Chademo adapter (works for model S, won't work on the roadster). Other cars that support Chademo can use it (such as leafs with the adapter).
     
  5. Johan

    Johan Took a TSLA bear test. Came back negative.

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  6. efxjim

    efxjim Member

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    If we have the signaling protocol for the S it could be used to directly connect to the battery as a source to power an inverter for emergency power. ie. Car to grid. As well as high power charging. I would love to make a bi-directional unit to move power from the night time rates to offset the higher peak rates.
     
  7. Seattle

    Seattle Member

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  8. rolosrevenge

    rolosrevenge Dr. EVS

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    Anything is possible if you've got the money to pay for it. Is it worth it? I'm gonna say probably not.

    Also 20 kW hpwc is better than 12 kW dc.
     
  9. Johan

    Johan Took a TSLA bear test. Came back negative.

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    Right, but it's a cool proof of concept.
     
  10. mnx

    mnx 2013 P85

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    The description of the video says they are going to do 20kW next. This is not very exciting for Model S owners, but what does the Leaf normally charge at? 3.3kW? In that case 12kW is a huge improvement.
     

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