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Is NEMA 14-50 AND Tesla Wall Connector a good idea?

Does anyone install Tesla Wall Connector AND NEMA 14-50 (or 6-50) outlet? Seems that this would either require 100A total dedicated current from breaker box OR somehow add a NEMA plug to the Tesla Wall Connector so that we have to go through the NEMA plug regardless. My electrician was saying this is what some people do but maybe there was a misunderstanding?

Is it relatively easy to convert TWC to NEMA 14-50 and vice-versa ? Seems like it is from what I've read.

Thank you!
 
Well I plug my model y into a 14-50 plug every day using the mobile connector supplied by Tesla and the 14-50 adapter and it draws a max of 32A. If you can tell me how to get more charging power out of that setup I would be forever in your debt.
Stop using the Gen 2 mobile connector and use a EVSE capable of supplying 40A. Like the Gen 1 mobile connector. Or a ChargePoint Home. Or any other one that's 40A capable.
 
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jcanoe

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Oct 2, 2020
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Well I plug my model y into a 14-50 plug every day using the mobile connector supplied by Tesla and the 14-50 adapter and it draws a max of 32A. If you can tell me how to get more charging power out of that setup I would be forever in your debt.
You can't exceed 32 amps as the Gen2 Mobile Connector is limited to a maximum of 32 amps when using the 14-50 or 6-50 power plug adapter. If you need to be able to charge at 40 amps Tesla sells a different model, the Corded Mobile Connector. The Corded Mobile Connector has a fixed, non-interchangeable 14-50 power plug. The Corded Mobile Connector enables charging at 40 amps. (This product is available from the Tesla store web site but is frequently Out of Stock.)
 
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To the OP -
Best way to future-proof would be to install a sub panel in the garage with a circuit for your Tesla. If you want/need another circuit later on it’s a trivial matter to run it off the sub panel.

In terms of what charging device to use, that’s up to you. Whatever you do, install it according to the instructions. Considerations:
  • Putting a plug on a Tesla wall connector is a bad idea. It’s not allowed per the instructions, it decreases the reliability of the system by introducing a receptacle and plug and will also significantly increase the cost - you need to pay for the plug, pay for the outlet and pay for a GFI breaker that’s now required. Just get it hardwired like the instructions say. If you need to change it later on it’s not that difficult.
  • Get a NEMA 20 or 30 or 40 or 50 amp outlet And use the mobile connector.
    • You’ll need a GFI breaker, and a good quality receptacle, adding some cost, depending on the circuit capacity
    • More flexible - you can bring the mobile connector with you on trips.
    • The more you plug and unplug something into an outlet, the sooner it wears out. High-power outlets are not designed for repeated use
  • Like @jcanoe said, Tesla makes a J1772 wall connector if you’re worried about connecting to a non-Tesla car in the future.
  • you can also find Tesla-J1772 adapters but they’re harder to find and more expensive than the J1772-Tesla adapters.
I also agree with @roblab in that most people overestimate their charging needs. IME, it’s pretty rare that you need to charge more than 40-50% overnight. Most people can absolutely make do with a 20A-220V outlet like he does, you just need to plan a bit more. The higher power outlet just gives a backup for the times you forget to plug your car in.

Another consideration - I have an off-peak charging plan with my electric utility. Cheaper but only allows overnight charging. If you have Restricted charging times you may want a higher power connection.
 
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Does anyone install Tesla Wall Connector AND NEMA 14-50 (or 6-50) outlet? Seems that this would either require 100A total dedicated current from breaker box OR somehow add a NEMA plug to the Tesla Wall Connector so that we have to go through the NEMA plug regardless. My electrician was saying this is what some people do but maybe there was a misunderstanding?

Is it relatively easy to convert TWC to NEMA 14-50 and vice-versa ? Seems like it is from what I've read.

Thank you!
Yes- I did this along with a sub panel- two breakers one at 60 and one at 50
 
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Either the wall connector or a NEMA 14-50 will work well for Tesla charging.
In the future if you wanted to remove a wall connector and install a NEMA 14-50 that would not be difficult or costly to do as long as your electrician runs all 4 wires (2 hots, a neutral, and a ground) required for a NEMA 14-50. The Tesla wall connector only requires 3 wires (2 hots and a ground).

I installed my wall connector myself. It is not particularly difficult to do and there are many Youtube videos out there on the installation. I ran all 4 wires because I wanted the option to install a NEMA 14-50 if I ever have a need to do so.
 
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My neighbor OP - in case you are looking for Gen 3 WC, here is my shameless "plug" FS:
:p

Thank you - I'm still evaluating my options but I might come back to you
 
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Thank you so much for all the replies. I'm having second thoughts about my first electrician choice (they did a great job on my solar but they seem less knowledgeable about EV chargers). I'm leaning now towards just getting a 14-50 installed - I think that's the most future proof way to go. I think at some point all the charger ports on EV's will be standardized (although who knows - Apple still uses lightning cable so maybe Tesla is a big enough gorilla to have a proprietary standard and everyone else will have to add adapters).

Thank you so much! You've cleared up some of my misunderstandings. I'm looking forward to ordering my Model Y soon.
Just want to share with you my experience on the level 2 setup in my garage for my model 3 Long Range. In may garage, I have a 240VAC/30AMP outlet behind the dryer which is not in use since I use the gas dryer. So, I use that 240 outlet (14-30) for my level 2 charger. I travel to work 140 miles round trip 4 days a week. I plug in every night at 9PM (for cheaper rate) and by 4 AM the car has 85% charged; well enough for my daily commute. I have not seen the gas station since I bought my Model 3. It is hard for me to buy the ICE car in the future :).
 
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A55!

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May 19, 2021
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My personal situation,

I have a Tesla Wall Connector as well as a 14-50 Receptacle inside my garage. They are two separate circuit breakers. I have one MYLR, and waiting on an M3P.

When charging with the 14-50 Receptacle, I will probably just have a LONG, properly rated, camper cable connected to my Tesla 14-50 adapter... that I've never used.

Waiting to see what happens with the Cybertruck, and a possible Gen 4 Wall Connector. My Wall Connector is on 100 AMP wire, but only a 60AMP breaker, as previously mentioned charging at 48. Which is more than enough. Sometimes I set it lower in the Tesla app.

I also have a smart smoke detector in my garage near the Circuit Breaker to complement the other smoke detector in my garage that is wired into my home.
 
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Charging an EV is not like running the dryer for 45 minutes to dry your clothes. [snip]... I ran #6 wire to add margin
[snip]... There is a YouTube video from Munro and Associates that talks about this problem. I can't imagine spending $50K on and EV and skimping on the outlet [snip]...
Maybe the wires aren't fully seated or torqued, maybe the breaker is the wrong type, or the bus bars were corroded, maybe a wire is under sized.


I was going to reply with multiple good points you already made.

My biggest concern about this thread is advice that is either not code compliant or is plain wrong. And as the video points out, this is dangerous and is a serious subject. Most localities require permits and code compliance, usually to recent NEC. There are enough complexities and risks that the advice to use a reputable electrician is wise, if not legally required.

During the 4 months between my 2022 M3 OD & DD, I did a LOT of research. I was going 14-50. When I ordered my M3 in May 2023, I also ordered the $200 mobile connector that included 14-50 plug. But passed on the wall connector. I later learned:

1) Latest NEC requires GFCI protection on ALL outlets in garages. A 14-50 thus requires a 60A GFCI breaker; cost- almost $200.

The directly wired Tesla wall connector has code compliant GFCI built in; no additional GFCI is required.

2) All high power wiring has V drop & power loss due to resistance, that generates heat, even when done code compliant. I didn't want power loss & heat. I chose 6 ga wire where 8 ga is typical. Larger gage ground wire is also needed.

As a result, I believe my circuit runs cooler with less V drop. There are YouTube thermal image videos, showing heat all along the circuit. I wanted to reduce that.

3) It's very important to properly secure screw connections. Thick stranded wiring needs to be iteratively tightened, wiggled, and tightened more. A very good connection is very important.

Components are labeled with torque requirements. Use a torque screwdriver or some other means to assure specific torque.

4) 14-50 plugs were designed for low duty cycle (% of time used at rated power) and few plugging cycles. Think dryers and stoves.

Yes, there are heavier duty 14-50 sockets better suited for higher duty cycles. Campgrounds deal with this. RVs and campers use 50A 240VAC 14-50 outlets, resulting in many plugging cycles/year. I guarantee campgrounds don't use $10 or $20 14-50 outlets made by some unknown manufacturer.

5) As the Munro Live video mentions, FIRES with home EV wiring is a significant and GROWING problem, with the acceleration in EV sales. Even professional installs using 14-50 plugs have had fires.

Learning all that, I settled on a direct wired Tesla wall connector, with thicker than typical wiring... All the code compliance boxes were checked.

I'm happy to also have the mobile connector. I've used 50A 14-50 well at campgrounds. I have even gotten a decent charge overnight (while away from home) using a properly wired 120VAC 20A outlet.
 
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I have a nema 14-50 out let as well as a hardwired gen 3 tesla wall connector in my garage both on its own circuit to the main breaker. My house has 200amp service. The gen 3 wall connector is on a 60 amp breaker and I always charge my model x plaid with it and always at 48 amps. The 14-50 outlet has a gen one tesla corded mobile connector and that is used to charge my wife’s bmw i3 via a lectron tesla to j1771 adaptor. Even though the 14-50 and the gen 1 mobile connector can charge at 40 amps the bmw‘s on board charge is limited to 32 amps. Works great for us. We also run the cheep leviton 14-50 outlet but we never really unplug the mobile connector.
 
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Rocky_H

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Feb 19, 2015
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My biggest concern about this thread is advice that is either not code compliant or is plain wrong.

1) Latest NEC requires GFCI protection on ALL outlets in garages. A 14-50 thus requires a 60A GFCI breaker;
Then I really hope this is just a typo. The breaker rating must not be higher than the outlet rating. So a 14-50 must not use higher than a 50A breaker.
 
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No issues at all.............
 

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Agreed - it really makes no sense. Adds extra cost, extra complexity and extra points of failure, all for no benefit.
And it arguably takes longer to install a 2 gang box, install an outlet in the box, put a faceplate over the box, put a cord and plug on the WC, and mount the WC to the wall separately, than it would have to just hardwire the WC and remove it when you're done with it. So it's also extra work with negative benefits (inability to charge at 48A). And to add to that, the wire terminations are in the wrong place so to hardwire a EVSE in the future, those wires would have to be extended first.
 
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