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Is regen same across all models?

The regen levels between models and between front and rear motor might vary by software version as well. To everybody saying that the AWD models only regen using the rear motor, I seemed to remember seeing someone post data showing otherwise. I went looking and found the info from around 2 years ago. That is why I commented earlier that the regen probably varies depending on many conditions that only Tesla knows. Anyway, here is the data with nice graphs showing the regen. This is just to show that, at least at one point in time, the AWD Model 3 did regen from both motors. That may not be true anymore. Also, relying on data from Scan My Tesla may not be the best source because its definitions become outdated with Tesla software updates and it could take some time for the developer to rediscover the new ones (so what used to be front motor torque might now be something else, or nothing).

Edit: Wugz on reddit collects a lot of data on his AWD Model 3 and occasionally posts a lot of info on what he's measured or observed. You can check this post and the one right below it for more info on what he's seen with regen (scroll down to Regen/Power Limits and Power Bar Mapping and right below that his continued response).
 
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I tested this again today, no change from before. 100% of the regen braking is on the rear motor. I tried different speeds, brake pedal or just coasting... all rear motor.
View attachment 706275
and there's zero chance that for some reason, it wouldn't register here? It's interesting to think there would only be regen from the back but the logic here is that it's because the rear motors are a permanent magnet. However, there seems to be an opportunity here to also have more regen on the front end. But, to have some on the front would, in most situations, probably take away opportunity to regen from the back unless the back is always working to regen at max and any additional would come from the front.
 
The regen levels between models and between front and rear motor might vary by software version as well. To everybody saying that the AWD models only regen using the rear motor, I seemed to remember seeing someone post data showing otherwise. I went looking and found the info from around 2 years ago. That is why I commented earlier that the regen probably varies depending on many conditions that only Tesla knows. Anyway, here is the data with nice graphs showing the regen. This is just to show that, at least at one point in time, the AWD Model 3 did regen from both motors. That may not be true anymore. Also, relying on data from Scan My Tesla may not be the best source because its definitions become outdated with Tesla software updates and it could take some time for the developer to rediscover the new ones (so what used to be front motor torque might now be something else, or nothing).

Edit: Wugz on reddit collects a lot of data on his AWD Model 3 and occasionally posts a lot of info on what he's measured or observed. You can check this post and the one right below it for more info on what he's seen with regen (scroll down to Regen/Power Limits and Power Bar Mapping and right below that his continued response).
Yeah I was wondering this, if it would truly reveal all that data accurately or not.
 
I own a 2018 Tesla M3, AWD, LR and a 2022 Chevy Bolt (I think I bought the last Bolt in the USA before the big recall, just a few hours later). Anyway, the way the regen works in the Bolt is MUCH better than the Tesla for countless reasons. The Bolt has a lever on the steering wheel to use regen to come to a complete stop (and often above 50KW charging as it does it) without touching the brake pedal. And if the brake is used, the more pressure on the brake, the more regen. This is in addition to the declaration regen. And it displays the KW used and gained as driving. I have to wonder if the disk brakes ever engage at all.

I think Tesla could learn a few good ideas from Chevy.

The Tesla M3 only has two settings for deceleration regen and has NO brake regen. I would like less regen than the mild setting (I only use the default regen in city traffic) with a lot of brake regen. I wonder if it is possible for them to do with an update someday to make the regen more reasonable.

IMO, the Bolt is perfect with it's regen, I see no way to improve it. OTOH, with Tesla's regen . . . .

-Don- Reno, NV
I agree with the part about it would be nice to have a display for regen in KW but overall I think the entire way in which the regen in Tesla operates is superior for my taste.
 

NATO

Member
Jun 21, 2021
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United Kingdom
Hmm so it was enough for you to easily notice?
Yeah I noticed straight away, found myself using the brakes a little more rather than purely one pedal driving. It's not a massive difference, but I noticed something.

Could also be something to do with the extra weight of the LR, perhaps the same regen force is being applied but it just has less of an effect on the heavier car.
 
Yeah I noticed straight away, found myself using the brakes a little more rather than purely one pedal driving. It's not a massive difference, but I noticed something.

Could also be something to do with the extra weight of the LR, perhaps the same regen force is being applied but it just has less of an effect on the heavier car.
Unsure, but drove a Performance 3 the other day and it bites pretty hard. I wonder what all this really boils down to. I am certain what I am imagining is not placebo but some kind of variable that someone has a real answer to.
 
Regen on my AWD definitely stops the car slower than on my LR RWD. I don't know if the regen limit is different or if it's the 450 lbs of extra weight for the AWD.
Interesting and you'd think they might up the regen for this, no? Some say they did but some say they feel no difference and some say it's the same strength regen but the weight difference. Really mixed answers but it's nice to hear you say you notice a difference because I definitely do sometimes but I've felt that difference from one awd to another of the same model. Why?? Weird.
 
don’t lift your foot completely off the accelerator.
That becomes too touchy for me. But I realize it can be done, just set everything to max and don't use max. I prefer to be able to let go and just coast at a reasonable speed, as does my Chevy Bolt. But when I want more regen, I can adjust it as I am slowing down with the regen on the steering wheel.

-Don- Reno, NV
 
We have a Cadillac ELR (basically a gen 1 Volt, similar in operation to your Bolt) in addition to our Model 3 and I much prefer Tesla’s implementation of regen control.
I don't know about the Cadillac and how it compares to the 2022 Chevy Bolt. I don't understand how anybody can prefer Tesla's method of too much regen at default and none added with the brake pedal and no real control over it while driving.

With the Bolt I decide how much regen I want every time I want to slow down. and it also adds progressively with the brake pedal. I prefer weak regen (except for city driving) with a lot of brake regen.

-Don- Reno, NV
 

MY-Y

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Mar 4, 2020
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I don't know about the Cadillac and how it compares to the 2022 Chevy Bolt. I don't understand how anybody can prefer Tesla's method of too much regen at default and none added with the brake pedal and no real control over it while driving.

With the Bolt I decide how much regen I want every time I want to slow down. and it also adds progressively with the brake pedal. I prefer weak regen (except for city driving) with a lot of brake regen.

-Don- Reno, NV
After a couple of drives when new, I drive my MY without touching the brakes most days. I don't even think about this - just a smooth integrated one-pedal experience. My son was able to do the same in my MY after driving it just a few times, and he is a teen driver. It's really not hard to master.
 
That becomes too touchy for me. But I realize it can be done, just set everything to max and don't use max. I prefer to be able to let go and just coast at a reasonable speed, as does my Chevy Bolt. But when I want more regen, I can adjust it as I am slowing down with the regen on the steering wheel.

-Don- Reno, NV
Totally get that. But objectively it is simpler to not need to adjust that with your hand. It's all just from the foot. Response also more immediate this way.
 
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stopcrazypp

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Dec 8, 2007
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I don't know about the Cadillac and how it compares to the 2022 Chevy Bolt. I don't understand how anybody can prefer Tesla's method of too much regen at default and none added with the brake pedal and no real control over it while driving.

With the Bolt I decide how much regen I want every time I want to slow down. and it also adds progressively with the brake pedal. I prefer weak regen (except for city driving) with a lot of brake regen.

-Don- Reno, NV
It is controllable by modulating the accelerator pedal (do not let it off completely). Wasn't hard for me to get used to it, but I realize this doesn't jive with certain people (for some people when Tesla removed the regen setting it was a deal breaker).

I think the decision not to blend with brake pedal is to avoid the complaints of artificial brake feel that hybrids had.
 
for some people when Tesla removed the regen setting it was a deal breaker).
My 2018 Tesla was my first EV car. I had two Zero motorcycles before then.

If today, the Tesla regen could be a deal breaker for me too, after seeing the way they did it in my 2022 Chevy Bolt. But I wonder why they would remove it in the first place, just select what you like makes more sense to me.

-Don- Auburn, CA
 
Totally get that. But objectively it is simpler to not need to adjust that with your hand. It's all just from the foot. Response also more immediate this way.
I disagree on both. I love to be able to control the regen by my left hand. And I still have the choice to use both it and the brake pedal.

-Don- Auburn, CA
 
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SaintMickey®

Closed
Sep 19, 2021
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I always wondered the benefits of a dual motor. We got a SLR because its a 4th car and only used as a daily 40 mile roundtrip commuter. Makes sense that only the wheels with the motor could do regen.

My question is- Is that how the car gets the longer range solely on the dual motors regen? I always assumed the AWD had more batteries or something for the range.

When we test drove a dual motor it seemed more "jerky" on stops to us...the SLR seemed "smoother" at the time we didn't really know why. Maybe it was both motor's regen "kicking in"?


Screen Shot 2021-09-25 at 10.31.24 AM.png
 
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