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Is Tesla Y better than other all electric SUVs?

Hi all, We have been on the waitlist for the Tesla Model Y for close to a year now. Tesla told us to expect the car this month and now I am getting cold feat since the car is way more than I have ever spent on a car. So I am looking at the all-electric competition in the lower price range and wondering if anyone could help me justify why the Tesla Y is better than these cheaper all electric alternative SUVs:


Ford Mustang Mach-E

Volkswagen ID.4

Volvo C40

Hyundai Ioniq

Audi Q4 etron
 
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Look: The S.O. and I have had an M3 since 2018. We sold the Prius in the garage and went looking for another BEV in late 2021.

Test rode a Ford Mustang. Small trunk, small frunk, MPGe less than MY. VW ID.4 had totally confusing NAV panel, extremely non-intuitive.

You get in the MY and it Just Drives. No muss, no fuss, and its 270 W-hr/mile blows away the competition. At speed, too. Intuitive operation with that flat screen, really.

And charging.. you can roam the US and it’s really, really hard to find a broken Supercharger. No fumbling around with credit cards, dongles, funky keychains: Just plug the car in and one is DONE. And back on one’s way in 20 minutes. Go to supercharge.info and pull up the map: Nobody has a charging infrastructure like it.

Been all over the East Coast from MA to FL and as far west as Chicago and Kentucky. The MY rides better than the M3 and has ridiculous storage.

The Supercharger network costs about 3x the cost of charging at home, which makes it about as expensive (in terms of fuel) as that Prius, with a better ride, pickup, 2.5 the room for luggage, and durn near zero maintenance. Charge at home with L2 (recommended) and the other guys, BEV and ICE/hybrid get blown out of the water on costs.

Tesla’s been making BEVs since, what, 2004 or something? Everybody else is just playing catch-up. In another 5 years the competition will get there, maybe, but why screw around now?

It’s like 2010 and buying a hybrid: one could get a Prius or that Honda Insight. Similar specs, look about the same-but the Prius was clearly the better car, more room, better pickup, better mileage, and, as we all found out later, a better drivetrain without early battery capacity death.

Don’t mess around.
 
Others to add to your list:

Kia EV6
MBZ EQB
Bolt EUV (yes... I said this)

You should really test drive and sit in to compare.

We like our Y... but I like some of those other models better for interior space and softer ride... specifically the Ioniq 5 and the Mach-E. I haven't sat in a EQB but I think it's a good luxury EV for the price.

As for range etc, that's subjective. The Y probably has the best mile/KW and supercharging but depending on your usage, you may not notice that.

But we got our Y for $40k so our comparison is unfair. If I were to shop an EV today... I would definitely be looking at the others.
 
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So I am looking at the all-electric competition in the lower price range and wondering if anyone could help me justify why the Tesla Y is better than these cheaper all electric alternative SUVs:
I would agree with @Tronguy if it is just for city driving and grocery shopping, basically any EV could do the job.

But when considering making a trip, with a Tesla you just seat, set the destination, and go.
The navigation is very well integrated with the supercharger network.

So no worry about range anxiety, the navigation constantly determine which supercharger to use,
based on your speed, wind condition...

And using a Tesla Supercharger is just Park and Plug.
There is no need to use a credit card, NFC dongle, or a phone App.

I only experienced a VW ID.4 with Electrify America CCS network.
When you arrive at a Supercharger, you need to activate a charging session
with your phone and select which charger you need to use, before plugging your vehicle.

Tesla vehicles have certainly the best consumption, something to consider when making a long trip.
You should check some comparisons made by Bjørn Nyland (1000 km - 620 miles challenges)

There are numerous Tesla Superchargers, at least with 12 stalls, and on main highways some locations have up to 56 stalls.
You can also use the CCS superchargers, but typically they have two to four stalls, and they are often not very reliable.

I would also recommend watching some of the Youtube EV Charging Tests mostly based on CCS chargers with good and bad experiences.
 
Others to add to your list:

Kia EV6
MBZ EQB
Bolt EUV (yes... I said this)

You should really test drive and sit in to compare.

We like our Y... but I like some of those other models better for interior space and softer ride... specifically the Ioniq 5 and the Mach-E. I haven't sat in a EQB but I think it's a good luxury EV for the price.

As for range etc, that's subjective. The Y probably has the best mile/KW and supercharging but depending on your usage, you may not notice that.

But we got our Y for $40k so our comparison is unfair. If I were to shop an EV today... I would definitely be looking at the others.
The EQB looks like a real SUV compared to all the other "hatchbacks". The price (50k range) is cheaper than I would expect from MBZ.
 
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Dennisis

Active Member
Supporting Member
Feb 11, 2020
1,183
1,232
Tucson
Tronguy nailed it. For around town you have a variety of options but if you'd like to take trips there is really only one decent option and that's Tesla. Until good charging networks are built around the country competitor's will be bit players IMO. I've taken many long trips and have a CCS adapter just in case but haven't had to use it. I'm sticking with the experience, software, and charging network until others catch up no matter how nice the vehicles look or how nice their ride is. I see Rivian's and Lucid's from time to time and they sure are nice but even at those prices they're lacking...
 
Ford Mustang Mach-E
Volkswagen ID.4
Volvo C40
Hyundai Ioniq
Audi Q4 etron
Most of the competitors are very inefficient. The VW & Audi cars are both slow acceleration and very short range for their categories. The Mach E has a crappy suspension, but I have not driven that one yet. The Hyundai Ioniq 5 and Kia EV6 are fantastic and are the killer competitors to the Model Y. Those two are equals or better in many ways. And the Chevy Bolt is amazing too. Different category, but incredible value and performer. I have a MY plus a Bolt and Ioniq 5 in my extended family.

It is nearly impossible to get an I5 Limited or EV6 GT-Line anywhere close to MSRP. That is what drove me to the Model Y. Otherwise, I would probably be driving an Ioniq 5 Limited.

Edit: I just remembered the other consideration that significantly limited my options - interior color. I live in an area with hot summers, so a black interior is a dealbreaker for me. I’ve had a black interior, and I won’t have another. Many of those other cars have limited to no non-black interior options. Mach E GT only comes with black interior. VW ID.4 only has gray paired with exterior colors I don’t like. C40, limited options with the gray wool. Etc.

Edit 2: I also forgot about EVs designed from a clean sheet vs. EVs adapted from ICE cars. I ruled out any car adapted from an ICE platform. Those tend to be heavier, slower, shorter range, have less storage, and have less interior space, because they cannot fully capitalize on the advantages of an EV platform. You can see it in the BMW, Mercedes-Benz, and some Genesis cars.
 
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dflowerz

Member
Supporting Member
Apr 16, 2022
29
32
Northern California
I forked out the bucks for a Model Y Performance and took delivery on Sept 2022. Was the price worth it? Totally subjective. Was worth it to me. Was briefly interested in the Hyundai Ioniq 5. I went with the Y because Tesla makes only electric cars and has been doing it for awhile now. Never considered anything else seriously. Also was looking for a change with Tesla's interior design concept as opposed to a more normal car interior. So far no regrets. Fun fast useful vehicle.
 
Run, don't walk, away from the ID.4. It's *still* not ready for prime-time. A little over a year ago I had one for 3-4 months; I disliked it so much that I sold it and got a Model 3 - a car that I had been actively avoiding. The Model 3 is so, so much better than the ID.4 I can't begin to describe it without a ridiculously long post. A post which, in fact, I made on the VW ID forums. You can find that long thing here, complete with a discussion. I'll put the text below, after a couple of MY specific comments.

Regarding the MY - it's just taller and heavier than the M3; mostly taller. With that, it's just not going to ride like it's on rails. It's...a small SUV and it corners like it. The MY is huge inside compared to the M3, the change to the hatchback helps so much. It still handles better than the ID.4 did. Disclaimer: I've got a MYP that now has 19" wheels, the stiffer suspension will help with some of that but the ID.4 is *not* good.

With that, here's my post from that other site. Which, by the way, you should visit if you're looking. Learn from them what you can.

FROM VWIDTALK DOT COM, keep in mind it's over a year old at this point:
There you go. After just over three months, my ID.4 is gone. Luckily Carvana is offering $42,000 for the car, which means I just about broke even after the tax credit, tint, a few accessories, and a $300 part to replace the infuriating pedestrian noise generator that I broke trying to silence/quiet the thing.

You can look up my very long posts pointing out the faults of the ID.4, but the short story is, it's just not ready for sale yet. The software is a hot mess, and some of the design decisions are so flawed as to be fatal. The kicker was the lane keep assist twice pushing me off the road towards a ditch, and twice into an oncoming car. It's too hard to overcome it, and because it resets every time you start the car, it's a PITA to turn off the dangerous tech. I will not allow my car to kill me. Oh - the 4-6 weeks to get a replacement windshield for a crack spreading across my eye line didn't help.

In short, just about every time I drove the ID.4 it would do something that would cause me to say "I hate this car." Literally. Those words.

The good stuff on the ID.4 vs. the M3: Build quality is slightly better, but surprisingly only slightly. The seat material is just amazing on the ID.4 (1st Edition). I'll miss all of the room in the back. Never thought I'd say this, but I miss kicking below the bumper to open the liftgate. The power sunshade was very nice. The speed control on the ID.4 is radar-based, and for the moment is better than the camera-only system on my M3. I'll miss Apple CarPlay...somewhat.

The M3, however: surprisingly good build quality. Yes, there are two panels that are touching but that can and will be adjusted. Everything else on delivery was perfect - and I'm picky. Look at my posts lambasting the ID.4.

Lane centering (Travel Assist on the ID.4, Autopilot on the M3) is...phenomenal. Wow. It's good on the ID.4, it's stunning on the M3. The glass roof tinting is just so much better, it's not even close. I had to leave the sunshade in the ID.4 closed all of the time, I think I won't be installing the sunshades that I bought for the M3 except for the really hot part of the summer. It's that good! (I did get the roof tinted with a ceramic tint, just like I did for the ID.4. I live in Houston) The acceleration and deceleration curves are far better. I didn't realize just how good one-pedal driving could be - and after three days I don't want to go back. This wasn't possible in the ID.4 not just because of the limited regen, but also the curve (how the regen kicked in and at what rate) just made it impossible to even start in B mode. And there's no creaking or rocking when I stop. It just stops, eerily smoothly without even using the brake pedal. Wonderful.

The interior is amazingly quiet until over 50-55 MPH...then it's not. So...it's OK. There have been recent improvements on this. The ride is surprisingly good, and in fact I think it's a much smoother and composed ride than my ID.4. The ID.4 was an FE on 21" wheels, this M3 has the 18" wheels. That has a lot to do with it - but it's more than that. It's just better suspension. It's way better on curves, even mild ones. Feels like it's on rails, where the ID.4 needed lots of power to settle in and track well - and it still didn't feel great.

I don't need or use the acceleration. I drove my ID.4 in Comfort mode, I drive the M3 in Chill mode. But holy cow. I've only got the Long Range, and when I do put it in Standard acceleration (the fastest I have) it's just wonderful. Lordy.

As an aside, the ID.4 is no slouch though. I wound up dusting a modified GTI. Took him by surprise at the first light, then left him behind at the second when he was up for the game. Fun! Only to 45-50 MPH, of course, with nobody in front and no cross roads. No opportunity to do that in a M3. Everyone knows...and that's fine.

The infotainment screen is just light-years ahead of the ID.4. It's fast, well laid out, and informative. Navigation is not just usable (which would be a huge improvement) it's pretty darn great! I can actually find charging stations that are not only relevant, but usable. I can look up an address on my phone and send it to the car with one button in the share sheet. Amazing. There are driver profiles, tied to your phone or key card (or fob if you're a luddite). They work. I thought I'd miss having the binnacle in front of me with speed, etc...don't care. Don't miss it at all. The rear-view camera is stunning. Never thought I'd describe a rear-view camera that way, but there it is.

The physical controls are great, too. The feel great, they work just as designed. They don't get accidentally activated because they're touch-sensitive. I haven't yet put the M3 into an unexpected/dangerous cruise control mode - something I did multiple times per day in the ID.4.

There's no piano black, anywhere, None. That deserves it's own line.

There is almost no plastic or rubber that meets a waxed surface on the outside. Yep - no more grey plastic. And the paint is beautiful.

The pedestrian warning sound is a reasonable volume in forward, if a bit loud in reverse. But it's fine.

The phone app is wonderful. It works - quickly - every time! It's useful. It doesn't log me out. I don't need a PIN or FaceID to access the ONE car I own, on a device I use FaceID to unlock.

One niggle - my car is only three months after they went all vision. There are ultrasonic sensors for parking, but no radar sensors for longer range stuff. It's all cameras. So, adaptive cruise control / Autopilot is a bit rough around the edges and not smooth. It's really sensitive about traffic in the next lane over. There's a thing called phantom braking that I have yet to experience, but I'm sure I will. Ugh. I'm quite a few software revisions behind, and expect my first one in a month or so. This should all improve rapidly - and Tesla actually pushes updates.

About those software updates. It seems that new cars typically don't get an update for a month or so, and can be delivered with a slightly out-of-date version to boot. There's no clarity on why, but the best reason I've seen pondered is this gives new owners a well-tested experience, and a month or so to learn the car before it starts doing new/better stuff. I'm OK with this because I know an update is coming and my car will be better.

The purchase process was great, but I did pay cash. There's no BS about stupid fees. Nobody tries to get you in the finance office and sell you crap. In Texas, you have to pay before the car is delivered - that took some getting used to but when I asked I was told that if I backed out for any reason, the money would be sent to me within a few days. Fine. For delivery I literally did not talk to anyone at the dealership except one fellow customer who said hello. Once your car is ready, your phone app is activated (I was still at home) and you can see your car. When you walk up to your car, use the phone to unlock the car through the app, then follow instructions to pair the phone as a key. Walk around the car, take notes if needed, set it up for you, and drive away. Paperwork was delivered electronically except for the state registration docs in a folder on the seat. Key cards were on the center console. Truly, this is the way. (If there was something that needed correcting, people are there)

I'll grant you that the M3 is a different beast from the ID.4. It's a sedan vs. a small SUV. But the Tesla is just better in almost every way that counts, and VW is quite simply selling a car that isn't ready. This year's model will never catch up due to hardware issues. And if you need the small SUV, the Model Y is for you - although they don't ride very well in my opinion. This is getting better, I'm told, it just wasn't there for me. (The story was that they set them up for towing, expecting lots more than what people are doing) And, of course, the MY isn't that great looking IMO. But that's fine - it's a great car.

The ID series will be great cars in 3-5 years. I do think it's the next VW Beetle. But for now, I could never recommend someone buy one. Get a Tesla. It's the best car out there at the moment.
 
The Mach E has a crappy suspension, but I have not driven that one yet.

It is nearly impossible to get an I5 Limited or EV6 GT-Line anywhere close to MSRP. That is what drove me to the Model Y. Otherwise, I would probably be driving an Ioniq 5 Limited.

I can confirm, our MMEGT kinda feels like a truck. And I tried REALLY hard to get an EV6 GT-Line or I5 before I bought my M3 but it was impossible.
The MMEGT is my wife's car and she's probably going to trade it for her preordered Fisker Ocean or my preordered R1T.

Edit: I just remembered the other consideration that significantly limited my options - interior color. I live in an area with hot summers, so a black interior is a dealbreaker for me. I’ve had a black interior, and I won’t have another. Many of those other cars have limited to no non-black interior options. Mach E GT only comes with black interior.

Not worth worrying about IMO. You and I have the same weather and our MMEGT interior being black isn't an issue being that it's not leather. When the cabin pre-conditioning actually works (lol) the seats aren't hot at all. Even getting into a hot car the seats aren't ridiculous at all

You probably don't have experience with how bad the Ford app is but I can confirm it's really really bad. Remote start hardly ever works, scheduled conditioning is hit or miss, and the app goes literal days before updating the car's status (right now my app shows the vehicle last updated 54 hours ago).
 
Why isn’t the Rivian R1S in the discussion mix? … similar price range
The R1S is not in a similar price range. Comparably configured, it is 50% more expensive than a MYLR. The R1S will be comparable to the Model X, in a couple years when you could actually get an R1S.

A friend has one, at the original price, and it is freakishly awesome. But it is not a MY competitor.
 
The MMEGT is my wife's car and she's probably going to trade it for her preordered Fisker Ocean or my preordered R1T.
The Fisker Ocean is one of the others on my list that I am considering. That and the Cadillac Lyriq. There is a lot I really like about both of those. I have deposits on a Lyriq and Blazer EV that I haven’t cancelled yet. I am considering a deposit on an Ocean. The bummer with the Ocean is that it does not check a lot of my boxes that could tempt me away from the MYLR. But I really do love a lot I have read about it - what little there is available. In both of those, I would really miss the frunk.
 
Hi all, We have been on the waitlist for the Tesla Model Y for close to a year now. Tesla told us to expect the car this month and now I am getting cold feat since the car is way more than I have ever spent on a car. So I am looking at the all-electric competition in the lower price range and wondering if anyone could help me justify why the Tesla Y is better than these cheaper all electric alternative SUVs:


Ford Mustang Mach-E

Volkswagen ID.4

Volvo C40

Hyundai Ioniq

Audi Q4 etron
Prior to placing my order for my Model Y I test drove a Mercedes EQS that had a price tag of $120k.
I liked the Tesla better.
In the two and a half months of ownership, I love my Y
 
There's no doubt that the Tesla Model Y isn't a perfect car, no matter what all the fanboys would like to say. However, the thing I have come to realize is it does the best job of alleviating all the potential problems of electric cars. It is intuitive, well engineered, capable and extremely efficient. All other cars right now require significant concessions or have notable downsides to them. The biggest one is the charging network and experience. It doesn't take long at all reading around the web or watching YouTube videos to find all the horror stories of Electrify America, EVGo, Chargepoint and others in the US. Things are different in Europe, but in North America the Tesla network outshines the rest by a country mile. To me, I have to have the confidence that when I show up at a DC fast charger, that thing is going to work, I'm going to get charged up, and I won't have to sit there for 2 hours to do it. Beyond that, here's things I've found in my research of competitors:

Mach-E: tons of software issues, phone key problems, they built them for a year with a battery contact module that is guaranteed to fail, and requires the entire battery to be removed to fix.
ID.4: even worse software problems in the car, like horrific failures, sometimes bricking the car, that still only may be fixed in the latest update, but maybe not
Ionic 5: smaller than the Y, doesn't precondition the battery so charging speed is a tossup, phone key on iPhone apparently has issues
Volvo: smaller than the Y, less range, for the same money
Q4 eTron: just a more expensive ID.4, a little nicer, hopefully gets better software than its less expensive sibling, audi app has issues, I could see this being tempting though

There are forums for all of these cars, just go read up on the common problems people have with them and see if they are deal breakers for you. I know for me, crappy onboard software, a lousy app, features that don't work, plus charging issues would drive me insane after dropping $50K+ on a car.
 

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