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Is there an overview of full-electric cars?

Discussion in 'Electric Vehicles' started by voyager, Oct 14, 2015.

  1. voyager

    voyager Member

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    You know, an objective overview that lists:
    1. vehicle weight
    2. battery pack weight
    3. drag coefficient
    4. range
    5. performance (0-60 mph)

    Actually very much like they exist for ICE-propelled cars.
     
  2. Kandiru

    Kandiru Member

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    Study this, plenty of info, I regularly visit insideevs.com:
    EV-comparison-v81-08102015.png
     
  3. voyager

    voyager Member

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    Thanks a bunch.
     
  4. voyager

    voyager Member

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    #4 voyager, Oct 24, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2015
    No statistics on how much time it takes to fully recharge though... I assume that the Mitsubishi i-MiEV with its 16 kWh battery does not require only one-fourth of the time or so to recharge compared to the Model S 70 kWh...
     
  5. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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    The most interesting column in that chart is "Price per kWh".
    Tesla has by far the lowest cost. Porsche is by far the highest.

    It still shocks me that over three years after the Model S launch no other car company offers a long range EV, and the short range EV are very expensive based on their price per kWh of battery storage.
     
  6. Cosmacelf

    Cosmacelf Active Member

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    it's even worse than that, it's been 7 years after the Roadster launch...
     
  7. LuigiV

    LuigiV Member

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    #7 LuigiV, Oct 24, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2015
    Eh, I wouldn't go that far. The way it's calculated on that chart (total vehicle price/battery capacity), it's a nearly meaningless metric. The only time this can be used for a meaningful comparison is between vehicles of the same type and class (eg. Focus Electric vs Leaf) and even then it's not the whole story.

    Now if the chart included the real cost per kWh (the cost of just the battery, not the whole vehicle) then we'd have something interesting.
     
  8. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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    What that metric shows is that Tesla is way ahead of everyone in terms of driving down battery costs.
     
  9. rtz

    rtz Member

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  10. LuigiV

    LuigiV Member

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    #10 LuigiV, Oct 25, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2015
    No, it simply doesn't. The sticker price of a vehicle is not 100% battery cost, there are many other components and price driving factors to consider. To divide the total cost of the vehicle (that accounts for the body, chassis, interior, sales margin, drivetrain and everything else) by just the battery capacity (that is only a single of many cost contributors) is practically a meaningless number. To compare the Model S to the Porsche Plug-in Hybrids is straight up apples and oranges as the BOM for both vehicles is vastly different.

    Whilst I do believe that Tesla does have the cheapest batteries in the industry, this metric is not the one that proves it.
     
  11. Oil4AsphaultOnly

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    because the answer is "it depends". If you already have a charger (assuming level 2 EVSE) in mind, then you just take it's capacity and divide it by the speed of your charger (assuming the car is compatible with it - many max out at 6.6kw, while others at 7.2kw or 10kw, and tesla at 20kw). If you use a DC Fast Charger (Chademo, CCS, Tesla Supercharger), different cars are compatible with different chargers. AND in the case of DC Fast Charging, it also depends on your starting state of charge. So not an easy data point to chart.
     
  12. pmadflyer

    pmadflyer Member

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    I'd really like to see a BEV only list, including the D models.
     
  13. AlexT

    AlexT Member

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    Nice table, however it really need a few extra columns. At the very least real-world numbers on electrical range.

    We recently test-drove the Audi A3 E-Tron and got roughly 11 miles of electric range (using a normal driving style).

    The car is also listed at 1,7 l / 100 km. Real world driving got closer to 6,9 l / 100 km (after using up the electrical range).

    These factory listings should in my opinion be illegal. Preferably replaced by actual real world measurements over at least 1000+ drivers.
     

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