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Isn't it about time to complain about I-10 again?

Discussion in 'Texas' started by Brunton, Sep 29, 2016.

  1. Brunton

    Brunton Pontificating the obvious

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    It's been a few weeks since I've seen anything about it. I'm beginning to suffer withdrawal systems.

    Come on, Tesla! I-10 is the ONLY way to get across country between October and May! (ok, a bit of an exaggeration, there). But I would like to see some progress. It will reduce my time from SC to Tucson significantly.
     
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  2. jbcarioca

    jbcarioca Active Member

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    This is making me concerned too. I10 is the shortest and easiest coast-to-coast route for nearly everyone in the Southern part of the US. The blanks are pretty much filled in on the 2016 Tesla Supercharger map but it seems not to be happening. What gives?
    In some of that area even PlugShare is sparse. They'd probably only need a single pair for some of them but we still want to go coast-to-coast in the winter!
     
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  3. McRat

    McRat Active Member

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    There is very little anything in West Texas along the I-10 except deer strikes and Troopers.

    Those will be the most expensive DCFC locations in the US.

    That being said, it's a major gap in the interstate DCFC network, probably the worst. The 10 is very handy.
     
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  4. jbcarioca

    jbcarioca Active Member

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    You are obviously correct except for the expense part. They have electricity even in pretty remote places there. In addition wind and solar power are both easy to do there also. Don't forget that nearly 10% of Texas power comes from West Texas wind, according to the Dallas Morning News.
     
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  5. McRat

    McRat Active Member

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    It's not electricity, it's volume. Capital has cost, and facilities require maintenance. If a DCFC station services 100 cars a day, it uses the capital more effectively than if it services 10 cars a day.

    If you must support charging 1 million EVs nationally, you get more bang for your buck when they are closer to urban areas. Hence the most expensive facilities are the ones that pump the least amount of miles per day into cars.

    I would venture a guess this is why you see neither SuperChargers nor CHAdeMO nor CCS in West Texas. It's not because it's not critical route, it's because they can service more cars with the same investment elsewhere.

    This is simply because there are not enough long range EV trips yet. The cars are available today because of Tesla and Tesla alone, but not in sufficient numbers so that the small portion of interstate travelers with these cars makes remote locations as economical as other routes.

    It's the same reason jet routes, train routes, bus routes, need to charge more for remote locations, and the # of departures is low.

    You must hand it to Tesla Motors, they completed a coast to coast route sooner than CHAdeMO and CCS. I assume they will cover the 10 at some point, but the expansion sure would go faster if they would monetize the EV grid. This would subsidize the remote location higher capital costs.
     
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  6. jbcarioca

    jbcarioca Active Member

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    We are not in disagreement. A quick view of any infrastructure clearly makes your points, anywhere in the world. In West Texas there are not even vey many places where they could put in Destination Chargers.
    To the extent that we disagree at all it is about the "network effect". In many aspects of distribution some nodes are little used but still are critical for a perception of adequacy. All over the world there are places like that. On a standalone basis they are absurd, but as network completion components they are invaluable.
    Do you think we disagree?

    Tesla has exceeded expectations in so many ways that it is hard to describe. Superchargers never had a chance of success, but now have become a critical success factor. I am constantly amazed at how much improvement there has been in such a short time, in so many ways. The immensity of their success is that we can complain these days that the great mostly empty spaces between Houston and Phoenix are not fully Supercharger-equipped. We complain because our nearly service center is 30 miles away, or 100. We complain about on air update content. That we can complain about such things is proof of tesla's success.

    Now, when will the I-10 gap be filled? When will the Miami Service Center open? When will my Model 3 be delivered?

    Is it not wonderful to be spoiled, as we are?
     
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  7. TexasEV

    TexasEV Active Member

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    The supercharger grid is monetized-- it sells cars that wouldn't be sold otherwise. Think of the network as a marketing expense, and a relatively low cost marketing expense at that. As Steve Jurvetson, a Tesla board member, famously said at the TMC conference two years ago, the supercharger network answers the question (I'm paraphrasing here, don't remember his exact words) "how would I get from A to B, when the person hasn't driven from A to B in years and has no intention of driving from A to B ever again. They just need to know it's possible."
     
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  8. jbcarioca

    jbcarioca Active Member

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    And...we actually pay for that, roughly $2000 per car as I recall. That is why a Supercharger in Norway is above the Arctic Circle. The joke is on Steve, though. By creating the Supercharger network tesla owners have begun to travel places by tesla that they'd previously have flown or not done at all. Tesla owners have spawned Road Trips all over to world.
    Now: who five years ago would have imagined that happening?
     
  9. Justicepool

    Justicepool Member

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    It sure looks like I10 is getting some attention now. Van Horn, Ft. Stockton, Ozona, and Junction.
     

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