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ISO jack recommendations

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by Patrick W, Oct 29, 2015.

  1. Patrick W

    Patrick W Member

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    I purchased a spare tire I put in the truck when I'm going to be traveling beyond cell and web service.

    Now I need to get a jack.

    The local auto parts store has a bunch of different kinds but being a pilot and not a car person I've no idea what to buy.

    Any suggestions of a specific jack what works well with Model S?
     
  2. linkster

    linkster Member

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    #2 linkster, Oct 29, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2015
    Dunno about your "ISO" requirement but I have deployed either a 1.5 or 2 ton (I can't remember) scissors jack, donut spare, and additional gear for emergency roadside repairs since spring '13.

    image.jpeg
     
  3. jaguar36

    jaguar36 Member

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    I don't think there are any ISO standards covering jacks.

    I picked up this one to use with my spare. Since I've got a big floor jack for use at home, I'll hopefully never need it. All I looked for is one with a reasonably large base so that it would be stable on the side of the road.
     
  4. Patrick W

    Patrick W Member

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    Nice kit. The gloves are a nice touch.

    What is the bar with the hook on the end next to the jack for? Also what's the block of wood for?

    And there appears to be something silver colored and oval shaped between the lug wrench and the spare tire. What is that?
     
  5. HankLloydRight

    HankLloydRight Fluxing

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    I think ISO means "in search of".
     
  6. linkster

    linkster Member

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    #6 linkster, Oct 31, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2015
    1. The bar with the hook is the scissor jack wrench
    2. The block of wood (which is cut from a 2x4) is carefully placed between the jack pad and one of the (4) Model S lift points
    3. The item next to the lug wrench is an 18650 cell (of course lol) powered flashlight that has several modes (as most do) that I place in flash-mode towards oncoming traffic (even during the day, but only if it is impossible to find a safe location off the roadway)

    I also now carry a high-vis reflector vest/shirt

    It is always safer to call professionals for any type of roadside assistance.
     
  7. Amped-Up

    Amped-Up Member

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    One thing you might want to add is a length of pipe that can slip over the lug wrench. At 125 ft.lbs of torque, those bolts could be hard to get off, or properly snugged.
     
  8. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    Just get a breaker bar and forego the lug wrench. You should have a socket and a torque wrench anyway.
     
  9. HankLloydRight

    HankLloydRight Fluxing

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    I have one of these from Tire Rack. Works great. Telescopes to 22".
    http://www.tirerack.com/accessories/detail.jsp?ID=59&brand=Gorilla&cat=Tools
    [​IMG]

    I also have one of these for a torque wrench (works with the above Gorilla wrench)
    Powerbuilt 940962 1/2 Drive Digital Torque Adapter, 29 to 147 ft-lbs - Torque Wrenches - Amazon.com

    - - - Updated - - -

    Can you give us some details on that awesome looking donut spare?
     
  10. linkster

    linkster Member

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    This is (1) of approx. (6) donut spares that I experimented with starting in '13. This particular one is a 19" Bentley, however, I can not recommend it as it will not fit (CB, bolt-circle) without machining and requires non-stock lug nuts. Here is a link to a steel 18" donut spare combo that several members are using.

    Compact Space Saver Tire/Wheel Solution - Page 3
     
  11. Patrick W

    Patrick W Member

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    Excellent list. I'll be adding those to my travel kit.

    Might another item be a couple of chocks to keep the car from rolling?
     
    • Like x 1
  12. linkster

    linkster Member

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    Jacking the S from one of the side jacking points along with very effective rear e-brakes pretty much eliminates any tendency to roll when on a reasonably level surface. However, your great chock idea may be required especially in mountain/snow country where conditions (slippery and steep) are challenging AND where you might have a rear flat thus loosing ~50% of e-brake capability. Always better to be overprepared IMO.
     
  13. Patrick W

    Patrick W Member

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    A quick trip to Walmart netted a jack, lug wrench (the one HankLloydRight recommended) and a pair of chocks.

    Then once home I followed your suggestion and cut a 2x4 to fit the car’s lift points. BTW, those points are narrower than a 2x4 so I cut it to the 65mm width of the points.

    Happily the jack, block and wrench all fit into the box the jack came in and even better the box fits inside the full size spare. Neat and tidy.

    Although all of that fits nicely in the frunk I checked with Tesla and they recommended against keeping a spare in the frunk as it could cause problems in the event of a front end collision. So I keep mine in the trunk.

    One side note, I could not find anything in the Model S owners manual about the size of the lug nuts. So I measured them and and found they are 21mm.

    And in case anyone is wondering, the spare stays in the garage most of the time. It only comes along when I’ll be traveling out of cell range (not uncommon in this area) or far enough away from help that I’d rather change the tire myself rather than wait an extended period of time.

    1tire.jpg 1post.jpg
     
  14. dgpcolorado

    dgpcolorado Member

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    I bought the same jack and it has a much larger foot than the Amazon picture shows. Lifts the Model S fine; I used a hockey puck between the jack and the Model S lift pad.

    [​IMG]

    Also purchased a folding tire iron and a torque wrench to use when carrying a spare. Leaning toward putting together a full size spare wheel/tire for long road trips; I wouldn't carry it when just driving locally. A plug kit, pump, and the jack should be enough for local driving, with a call for towing as backup plan. But on long road trips in remote areas, being able to self-rescue could be a big help. [Hardly any of my road trips are in reasonable towing range from a city, never mind an actual Tesla Service Center (I've never actually been anywhere near one yet).]
     
  15. AWDtsla

    AWDtsla Active Member

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    1.5 ton scissor jack would scare me under the Model S. Those things have a tendency to fold over anyway, but you can get pretty close to the design limit on uneven ground.
     
    • Like x 1
  16. dgpcolorado

    dgpcolorado Member

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    That's one reason I like the big foot and sturdy build of the one I bought. And the S is so low to the ground that I don't have to raise it very far to get the tire clear.

    Tested my torque wrench and it works fine to both loosen and tighten.
     
  17. SomeJoe7777

    SomeJoe7777 Marginally-Known Member

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    You can get a compact floor jack instead:

    2 ton Compact Trolley Jack

    I think it's a little bigger and heavier than the scissor jack above, but not by much.
     
  18. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    Using a torque wrench to loosen bolts will damage the calibration (there may be exceptions, but I don't know of any). Use a breaker bar for loosening.
     
    • Informative x 2
  19. dgpcolorado

    dgpcolorado Member

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    #19 dgpcolorado, Apr 7, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2016
    Thanks for that warning. Another tool to buy and carry! (Albeit, only on long trips.)

    That looks to be a lot bigger and heavier to carry in the car. Anyway, I don't get the concern; I tested the scissor jack and it is plenty sturdy and stable enough to lift a corner of a Model S on an occasional basis. If you don't believe me, there isn't much I can say beyond that.

    For me the everyday tools will be:
    • plug kit
    • pliers
    • 12V air pump/light
    • jack + hockey puck (as someone pointed out in a post elsewhere, a fully deflated tire might not be able to be re-inflated with a small air pump if the bead isn't sealed and using a jack to lift the car somewhat helps with that)
    • tire pressure gauge
    • gloves
    • tarp or old blanket
    • cell phone for "plan B" towing, assuming that I am in a cell reception area (not always the case in the mountains)

    Additional tools for long trips away from home:
    • spare wheel/tire
    • torque wrench, 21mm socket
    • ½ inch breaker bar
    • folding four-way lug wrench

    Not that I expect to change a tire on any given trip but I've had a lot of flat tires over the years and I don't live anywhere near a big city, much less a Service Center, so being able to self-rescue is helpful.
     
  20. aus

    aus Member

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