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Brady12

Member
Mar 22, 2018
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CA
IMG_5058.jpg
 

Boourns

Active Member
Mar 9, 2016
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Dallas
OMG you didn't charge it to 100% did you? This should give hot flashes to about half the residents here. Don't you know there's statistically significant chance that it might affect the battery in the non-TLC way?

You're obviously joking, but since there are a lot of new members here lately who may be new to EVs: Nothing wrong with charging your car to 100% when needed -- that's what it's for. Just don't charge to 100 and let the car sit for multiple hours.
 

Brady12

Member
Mar 22, 2018
27
13
CA
Going on a long trip so charged to 100% today.....normal charging is at 80%.....thanks!

OMG you didn't charge it to 100% did you? This should give hot flashes to about half the residents here. Don't you know there's statistically significant chance that it might affect the battery in the non-TLC way?
 
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Boourns

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Mar 9, 2016
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When I get my M3 I’ll probably schedule charging to 80 or 90% daily. Can you please explain why charging to 100% and letting it sit for an amount of time would be an issue? Thanks.

@Swampgator explained it perfectly. To avoid degradation, it's best for theae types of batteries (including the one in your phone) to not sit at a high state of charge. The most conservatively thinking is that the batteries are happiest between 20 and 80 percent. Personally I charge to 75 percent daily since that's plenty of range for my 70-mile round trip commute. But I don't hesitate to charge to 100 for a trip.

There a lots of threads on this topic in the S forums. Tesla has used the same type of battery all along.
 
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Electroman

Supporting Member
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Aug 18, 2012
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Interestingly in the Leaf from 2014 model Nissan completely removed the ability to charge to a specific percentage. So when you plug it in, it can only stop after charging all the way to 100% (unless of course you remove the plug and interrupt the charging).

Either Nissan reserved an additional 1 or 2 kWh capacity more than normal so 100% is really only 95% or so, or, they simply didn't care about the degradation.

In the future all EVs will make the 90% as the new 100% for the end user. So you can set it to 100% everyday and charge it, but in reality it is stopping at 90% because of extra buffer.
 

Boourns

Active Member
Mar 9, 2016
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Dallas
Would be so nice if our phones had the capability to set a charge maximum so we can still leave them on the charger all night and not have to worry about it. *sigh*

Good news: They do! On the home screen select charging. On the charging screen you'll see the big graphic of the battery. The little triangle right under the battery is the charge limit. Just drag it back and forth to set the charge limit. There's no "set charge limit" button like in the car's UI.
 
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North75

Member
Mar 28, 2017
608
772
MA
Good news: They do! On the home screen select charging. On the charging screen you'll see the big graphic of the battery. The little triangle right under the battery is the charge limit. Just drag it back and forth to set the charge limit. There's no "set charge limit" button like in the car's UI.
I think he might mean he wants to limit how much his phone charges to prevent battery degradation.
 

novox77

1.21 Gigawatts
Nov 25, 2017
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Would be so nice if our phones had the capability to set a charge maximum so we can still leave them on the charger all night and not have to worry about it. *sigh*

It's not as much of an issue with phones because people on average only use a device for 2-4 years. Just as you start to notice the battery degradation, you're wanting a new model. For an EV, I'd want my car battery to last longer than 4 years! :)

The other more significant part of this equation is temperature. High temps kill Li faster than high state of charge. Both at the same time is that much worse. Some people have phones mounted over HVAC vents in the car, and in the winter, that is really bad for the phone if hot air is blowing on it. Same if you accidentally leave your phone in the car in the summer. Some apps/games tax the phone CPU, generating lots of heat. that also reduces battery health.

I firmly believe that Tesla has a healthy head start when it comes to battery health management compared to other auto manufacturers. It's not readily apparent to a car buyer which OEM has robust safeguards in place to protect the battery. It's just not commonly advertised information. Battery management is one of those things that bite people further down the ownership road. And Tesla is developing a proven track record that no other company has yet:

Tesla batteries will live longer than expected, survey finds
 
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config.sys

Member
Apr 27, 2018
23
6
The Salt City
Interestingly in the Leaf from 2014 model Nissan completely removed the ability to charge to a specific percentage. So when you plug it in, it can only stop after charging all the way to 100% (unless of course you remove the plug and interrupt the charging).

Either Nissan reserved an additional 1 or 2 kWh capacity more than normal so 100% is really only 95% or so, or, they simply didn't care about the degradation.

In the future all EVs will make the 90% as the new 100% for the end user. So you can set it to 100% everyday and charge it, but in reality it is stopping at 90% because of extra buffer.

Nissan removed the ability to charge to 80% because it messed up their EPA ratings, that's it.
 
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TexasEV

Well-Known Member
Jun 5, 2013
7,650
8,911
Austin, TX
Nissan removed the ability to charge to 80% because it messed up their EPA ratings, that's it.
To explain further, if an EV had two charge settings (such as 80% for routine use and 100% for trip), the EPA said it would average the range of the two settings and that’s what could be advertised as the EPA rated range. This is one reason Tesla now has the slider, so there aren’t two settings for the EPA to average. The original firmware for the Model S had two settings, daily and trip, and daily was 92% or 93% as I recall.
 

S4WRXTTCS

Well-Known Member
May 3, 2015
5,715
6,853
Snohomish, WA
OMG you didn't charge it to 100% did you? This should give hot flashes to about half the residents here. Don't you know there's statistically significant chance that it might affect the battery in the non-TLC way?

It's a good joke, but technically you're supposed to charge to 100% occasionally to balance the cells.

What would give me hot-flashes is if they left it sitting at 100% for more than 12 hours.
 

S4WRXTTCS

Well-Known Member
May 3, 2015
5,715
6,853
Snohomish, WA
Ohhhhh. Haha yes that makes much more sense.

I don't think this is possible on Android or an iPhone without customizing it in some fashion. It no longer matters too much as it's easier now days to get the battery replaced. At least for an iPhone it is, and that had been a pretty big weakness to it.

I do wish more devices that this functionality.

I have a Boosted Board, and it doesn't offer this
.
I also have a Stromer E-Bike, and it doesn't offer this capability either.

Both of those devices would benefit a lot from it.
 

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