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Jack pads versus lifts (do lifts have built-in protection?)

Rothgarr

Member
Apr 15, 2019
743
579
United States
I have a jack pad for when I need to remove my wheels at home.

But what about lifts that you see at shops? Do those have something in place to protects the frame/battery/whatever?

I ask because I need to take my car to a shop tomorrow (tire-related work). I never thought about this before today and certainly not before I got a Tesla. I'll ask when I get there (I assume this isn't their first rodeo with a Tesla), but I thought I'd also ask here about people's experiences.
 
Last edited:

OK_3AWD

Member
Aug 7, 2019
9
16
Central Oklahoma
I have a 2 post lift at my home, and use tesla-specific jack inserts. Even though most lifts have rubber pads, the problem is the diameter of the rubber pad is significantly larger than the lift points on the car. The rubber is bounded with a steel rim that could put unwanted pressure on the area surrounding the car's lift points.
 

btownalset

Member
Jun 28, 2019
179
207
South Central Indiana
I’d just call ahead to make sure they will do it the way you want it to be done. The first and only time I had to bring my 3 for a patch, the technician was going to use a jack instead of the lift. The jack had no pad and he put it under the battery. I stopped him just before he started pumping. Mind you, I called ahead to verify they worked on Tesla’s before and when I arrived I pointed out the lift points on the to a different technician (thought he would pass along the info - um, nope). At the end of the day, I should have been way more direct in what I wanted.
 

KenC

Active Member
Sep 4, 2018
3,403
3,100
Maine
I'm going to have my tires changed for snows, and I'm going to put my jack pads in the holes when I'm there. Mine have enough friction to hang, so I'll just leave it like that. I don't trust just handing over 4 pucks to the guy at the desk since he may not tell the tech.
 

afadeev

Member
Feb 28, 2019
692
620
NYC
But what about lifts that you see at shops? Do those have something in place to protects the frame/battery/whatever?

There is nothing magical about Model 3's jacking points - they are, roughly, in the same spot you will find them in any modern sedan. Once can buy adopter pads that fit precisely into jack point indents, and help an amateur to raise the side of a car with a jack. A semi-competent pro can position a jack or a lift pad under the exact same spots without Tesla-specific jack pads.

Jacking by the designated lifting point is not much different in a Tesla then any other car.
No-one just blindly shoves a jack randomly under the floor of the car. That would damage any car's floor plan (it will bend) just as surely as it would damage Tesla's battery tray.

If you are dealing with a competent shop that worked on your cars before, you will be alright.
If you are going the to a local Monkey Wrench shop to cash in a discount coupon, then all bets are off, regardless of what car you bring to them!


Even though most lifts have rubber pads, the problem is the diameter of the rubber pad is significantly larger than the lift points on the car. The rubber is bounded with a steel rim that could put unwanted pressure on the area surrounding the car's lift points.

There is no problem.
The jacking point a single magical spot under Model 3's side rail. The entire bottom side-rail of the car is the load bearing member that supports the battery tray. Placing the lifting arm at around the lifting pad area is perfectly safe and structurally sound.


a
 
  • Informative
Reactions: mewantcookiez

Rothgarr

Member
Apr 15, 2019
743
579
United States
There is nothing magical about Model 3's jacking points - they are, roughly, in the same spot you will find them in any modern sedan. Once can buy adopter pads that fit precisely into jack point indents, and help an amateur to raise the side of a car with a jack. A semi-competent pro can position a jack or a lift pad under the exact same spots without Tesla-specific jack pads.

Jacking by the designated lifting point is not much different in a Tesla then any other car.
No-one just blindly shoves a jack randomly under the floor of the car. That would damage any car's floor plan (it will bend) just as surely as it would damage Tesla's battery tray.

If you are dealing with a competent shop that worked on your cars before, you will be alright.
If you are going the to a local Monkey Wrench shop to cash in a discount coupon, then all bets are off, regardless of what car you bring to them!




There is no problem.
The jacking point a single magical spot under Model 3's side rail. The entire bottom side-rail of the car is the load bearing member that supports the battery tray. Placing the lifting arm at around the lifting pad area is perfectly safe and structurally sound.


a
The manual seems pretty specific about the sweet spots and the spots to avoid.:

upload_2019-11-14_9-6-54.png
 

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