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Jacking up the Roadster, revisited

Discussion in 'Roadster' started by smorgasbord, Mar 23, 2014.

  1. smorgasbord

    smorgasbord Active Member

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    #1 smorgasbord, Mar 23, 2014
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2014
    I know there are some old threads on this, but here's a couple of different takes:


    Also, as we all know, you can only jack up one side of the car at a time (in the rear anyway). The Lotus Elise on which Roadster is based, however, has additional jack points located in back of the rear axle. There's even a thing called a "Jack Helper" that lets you jack up the whole rear end of an Elise with one jack without removing the rear pan:

    338041d1389970404-jcr-jack-helper-shift-balls-more-3_med.jpeg

    I looked around, and sure enough, it does look like one could jack up Roadster at those same two jack points (corresponding to two of the bottom pan screws). Here's a pix from my car, with my middle finger touching the screw head that I believe could be a good jack point:

    FingerOnjackPoint.jpg

    To me, it looks like there's attachment to the frame right there, and so that should work. I'm scared to try this, of course. And due to the way the pan slopes, it might be hard to locate things just right, and even then it'd only be good if you had a Jack Helper that was the right dimensions and could sit over the screws and stay located while you jack up, etc., etc. But, I do believe that if you remove the rear pan you could pretty easily jack the car up there - or at least put jack stands there so your jack isn't the only thing holding the car up.


    Something I may try is to build one of these:
    BrakeDiscSupport.jpeg

    Essentially, you jack the car up, remove the wheel, put this in place and lower the brake disc on it. Then you can go jack up the other side.
     
  2. smorgasbord

    smorgasbord Active Member

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    #2 smorgasbord, Jun 30, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 13, 2016
    Well, that got no responses. Here's another option, which may be the best: http://www.jackpointjackstands.com/



    Basically, it's a jack stand that's open on one side so you can slip it over your jack and then lower the pad onto it. This is a clever way to be able to use lifting point as your jack stand point. Since there are only 4 such points on Roadster (Lotus Elise has 8!), this would seem to be the only way to have a jack stand supporting at the rear lifting point.

    At $300/pair, it's not cheap. Since I don't think it's feasible to support Roadster by both its rear jacking points (is it?), I'm wondering if anyone is willing to split the cost of a pair. One should be enough for most DIY things on Roadster. PM me if you're interested (it'd be better if you're in NorCal so we wouldn't have a second shipping charge).
     
  3. spaceballs

    spaceballs Member

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    I've made custom lift adapter for the Dannmar MaxJax to lift the Roadsters. When I have time I will post the 3D data file freely so others can make their own, also I got measurements to modify the design to make it fit other standard car lifts.
     
  4. hcsharp

    hcsharp Active Member

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    I assume you are talking about the lift adapters that can be used on the Roadster just in front of the rear wheels so you can put the car on a lift? Like the adapters Tesla used to sell? That would be very helpful. I've been meaning to do this myself but never had time... but with the 3D image it would be easy to make.
     
  5. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    I'm working on a CAD drawing for a lift adapter, which I will share when it's done.
     
  6. wiztecy

    wiztecy Active Member

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    #6 wiztecy, Aug 18, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2014

    I use just a regular old 4x4 block of wood that's 10" long. I then lay it lengthwise, front to back direction of car and its stable. Drop the car with the rotor laying on the wood. No cutout, the wood is soft as is and the disc rotor very hard, you won't hurt anything. There's no oversized dust shield on the bottom of the rotor, that's usually the problem with most cars and vulnerable to damage.

    I have a low profile jack so I'm able to remove it with the 4" clearance given with the block of wood. If you need more height, go 6x6 or put a larger wood base under the 4x4 to raise the car so your jack can clear.
     
  7. smorgasbord

    smorgasbord Active Member

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    I've since heard to be careful since rotors are not attached expecting to hold the weight of the car that way.
     
  8. wiztecy

    wiztecy Active Member

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    #8 wiztecy, Aug 18, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2014
    I don't see anything wrong with it. The hub is the focus all the weight, just as when the wheel lugs are bolted to it. Its not bouncing and abnormal forces being subject to the hub or rotor.

    brakepadreplacement.jpg

    IMG_1177.jpg
     
  9. dgh

    dgh Member

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    #9 dgh, Sep 29, 2014
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2014
    http://www.jackpointjackstands.com/ - see post from smorgasbord

    Did you get these, and if so, are you happy with them? I am looking to store my roadster long term, so I was thinking of jacking up all four wheels, maybe even removing the wheels and let them rest on these stands for many months at a time?

    A bit off topic, but my motivation is I thought it might be helpful for long term storage, but I am a bit concerned it could be counter productive in "helping" with:
    --Avoiding flat spots on the tires. With the tires removed, I can store them in my house (rather than gararge) where I'd hope I'd have less issues with tire rot and any thing happening to the rims.
    --Having the weight of the Roadster supported by the jack stands, rather than its suspenstion 99% of the time (1% of the time will be when I am actually driving the Roadster.)
     
  10. Mark77a

    Mark77a Member

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    When I put my car up for 4 wheel off clean,
    1. used a workshop trolley jack the central side (chassis) jacking point to get both wheels of one side up,
    then
    2. used:
    Axle stand with 1" plywood blocks (or equivalent stiff rubber, etc.) under the same side front (chassis) jacking point
    Front.jpg
    PLUS
    Axle stand with with 1" soft plywood blocks under the rear lower suspension knuckle (which carries the full rear wheel load from Wheel>hub>knuckle>spring>chassis)
    as below (but at REAR) same Knuckle
    rear jacking.jpg


    then remove workshop trolley jack the central side (chassis) jacking point, and repeat above steps on opposite side...
    (I wish I'd taken a better pic than this of my car) ..
    rear jacj.jpg

    Here the rear suspension is at road position (whereas the front is on full droop)

    For storage I'd probably use the 'plywood block under knuckle' (as 2nd picture) on all 4 corners so all at road position.
     
  11. WarpedOne

    WarpedOne Supreme Premier

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    I don't want to steal this thread but what is that largish red/orange tube going from break disc cover into the body in the second picture above?
    Don't tell me Tesla used hot air from breakes for heating the cabin or something?

    Edit: judging from that orange blinker it is reverse thing happening: that hose brings fresh air directly to disc for better cooling. Right?
     
  12. wiztecy

    wiztecy Active Member

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    Its a pic from a Lotus Elise where a track user routed a front brake cooling duct towards the brake rotors to help dissipate the heat upon heavy braking.
     
  13. jthompson

    jthompson JThompson

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    Wow...very cool jack stand system!!! Thanks for sharing!!
     
  14. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    I have the same thing on my C6. You'll never get a Roadster's brakes hot enough to need it. Unfortunately.
     

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