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kWh prices world-wide

Discussion in 'Energy, Environment, and Policy' started by widodh, Mar 4, 2012.

  1. widodh

    widodh Model S R231 EU

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    As a follow-up on this topic: Fuel prices world-wide

    What do you pay for a kWh?

    I just moved into my new house and got a letter from the utility company with the prices for electricity here:

    - raw kWh: EUR 0,06
    - Taxes: EUR 0,12
    - VAT 19%: EUR 0,03

    Total: EUR 0,21 per kWh

    If I charge my Model S with the 85kWh with a 90% efficiency I consume about 94kWh. With 0.21 per kWh that's almost EUR 20,00 for a full charge of a Model S.

    As you can see, not only are taxes on gasoline high here (56%), they are even higher (~70%) on electricity.

    On the 85kWh battery I expect a real life range of about 320km (200m), so that brings me to EUR 0,06 per kilometer. That's cheaper then my Toyota Auris Hybrid (0,10 per KM).

    What do other forum users here pay for their electricity?

    Do you have a smart grid where (as a residence) you pay based on the time of the day?

    Do you have cheaper rates at night?

    I think this would be nice to sum up!
     
  2. ElSupreme

    ElSupreme Model S 03182

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    #2 ElSupreme, Mar 4, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2012
    I live in Georgia, USA and we have summer (June - Sept) rates and regular rates. Georgia Power (Southern Company) is my power provider. They have some of the nastiest Coal plants in the country. You can sign up for flat billing, time-of-use billing, or EV time-of-use billing. We get charged different rates depending on how much we use in a month. My power bill is almost always lower than my internet/tv bill.

    Flat Rate Winter:
    First 650 kWh: 5.0633¢ per kWh
    Next 350 kWh: 4.3443¢ per kWh
    Over 1000 kWh: 4.2647¢ per kWh

    Flat Rate Summer:
    First 650 kWh: 5.0633¢ per kWh
    Next 350 kWh: 8.4166¢ per kWh
    Over 1000 kWh: 8.6701¢ per kWh

    Regular ToU Rate All Year:
    'On Peak' (2PM - 7PM Weekdays Summer) - 19.2948¢ per kWh
    'Off Peak' ( not 'On Peak') - 4.3626¢ per kWh

    EV ToU Rate All Year:
    'On Peak' (2PM - 7PM Weekdays Summer) - 19.2948¢ per kWh
    'Off Peak' (7AM - 11PM and not 'On Peak') - 5.8295¢ per kWh
    'Super Off Peak' (11PM to 7AM) - 1.2500¢ per kWh


    I also pay 6% sales tax, ~6% environmental fee, ~3% Nuclear Construction Fee (only New nuclear reactor in USA in a long time is GA Power), and 85¢ county fee.

    I am thinking about the ToU rates. But my Fiancee works from home a lot. Maybe she can go to the office during the summer. And my poor doggies need a solution for them too.

    EDIT: I am on the flat rate program. I think it may be the cheapest option.
     
  3. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    Kongsberg, Norway
    Here, it costs about 0.3 Norwegian kroner per kWh in electricity and 0.5 kroner per kWh in transmission cost. That's a total of around $0.14/kWh or €0.11/kWh.

    There is no off-peak pricing, as we have enough hydropower that regulation of the power grid isn't an issue.

    The cost per km for a Model X will be around $0.035 or €0.028. My Honda CR-V costs around $0.25/km or €0.19/kWh with gas prices here. My CR-V isn't exactly efficient, but even if I drove an efficient car, the Model X would still cost around 70% less per km.
     
  4. Beavis

    Beavis Signature 991

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    Colorful Colorado
    In rural CO, $.1197 flat rate. Time of Use rate is $.13 from 7am to 11pm and $.01 from 11pm tp 7am. Naturally, I will be on the TOU plan and charge at a penny per KwH.
     
  5. widodh

    widodh Model S R231 EU

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    Do you use the range Tesla gives for the battery pack? Since I don't think you'll be able to get 480km out of the 85kWh pack.

    That's why I use 320km for a real-world range of the 85kWh pack.
     
  6. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    I used 250 Wh/km (340 km range), which is fairly pessimistic. How much range you get depends on how you drive. Here, the speed limits of most roads are a maximum of 80 kmph/ 50 mph, which is less than the reference 55 mph. If you drive at 120kmph/75 mph, a range of 320 km would be optimistic.
     
  7. clea

    clea Member

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    Location:
    Laval, Quebec
    In Quebec, Canada, we only have one rate for residential (AFAIK).
    Fixed charge : $0.4064/day
    First 30 kWh per day $0.0539/kWh/day
    Remaining kWh per day : $0.0751/kWh/day
    add on federal tax (GST): 5.0%
    add on provincial tax on the subtotal (QST): 9.5%


    Using widohd's 90% efficiency of charging I estimated an average daily cost of approx $1.25/day to charge for my driving habits. This is of course assuming that my cost for the car is above the normal usage so doesn't benefit from the cheaper price for the first 30 kWh/day.


    They (Hydro Quebec) are in the beginning stages of deploying smart meters but they are only talking about the automatic meter readings and outage detection so i wouldn't consider it being classified as a smart grid implementation just yet.
     
  8. jkirkebo

    jkirkebo Model S P85+ VIN 14420 EU

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    Location:
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    And transmission costs vary widely depending on where you live. I pay only 0.36NOK/kWH for transmission, thus about €0.10/kWh total including all taxes and VAT.

    But the price can quickly change as I pay spot-market prices. Tomorrow power might be even cheaper, or prices could double. I get billed a one month spot price average.
     
  9. Lloyd

    Lloyd Active Member

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    #9 Lloyd, Mar 4, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2012
    See Below for California'a very high rates!

    Copy of ResTOUCurrent_Page_1.jpg Copy of ResTOUCurrent_Page_2.jpg Copy of ResTOUCurrent_Page_3.jpg Copy of ResTOUCurrent_Page_4.jpg
     
  10. markwj

    markwj Moderator, Asia Pacific

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    Hong Kong
    Hong Kong (Kowloon):

    ä½￾宅用電價目


    Total Bimonthly* Consumption Rate (Cents/Unit)
    Each of the first 400 units: HK$0.778
    Each of the next 600 units: HK$0.893
    Each of the next 800 units: HK$1.034
    Each of the next 800 units: HK$1.210
    Each unit over 2,600 units: HK$1.295

    The fuel clause charge is HK$0.178 per unit.
    The rebate is HK$033 per unit.

    A unit it 1kWh.

    Worst case, around HK$1.44 per kWh (~US$0.1846/kWh).

    No real off peak benefit. Rumors of a solar feed-back to the grid system coming, but nothing substantial.
     
  11. Robert.Boston

    Robert.Boston Model S VIN P01536

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    Portland, Maine, USA
    Here in Boston, the optional residential TOU rate currently is priced at fairly obscene levels, which is why I plan to charge mostly at the office, where the parking garage pays the power bill:














    Peak
    Off-Peak
    Oct - May
    19.96c/kWh
    12.24c/kWh
    June - Sept
    26.79c/kWh
    12.24c/kWh
     
  12. benji4

    benji4 Roadster 2.5 #0476

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    Tokyo, Japan
    Tokyo, Japan (Tokyo Electric Power "denki-jyouzu" plan, 1US$ = 81.6JPY)
































    Rate Type Start End cents/kWh
    night 11pm 7am 11.2
    morning 7am 10am 28.3
    afternoon (summer) 10am 5pm 40.9
    afternoon (non-summer) "" "" 34.7
    evening 5pm 11pm 28.3
     
  13. dsm363

    dsm363 Roadster + Sig Model S

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    I pay

    6.7 cents/kWh day or night. There is less than 2 cent surcharge for every kWh over 600 kWh

    Benji: 40.9 cents/kWh in the summer? Wow.
     
  14. roblab

    roblab Active Member

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    I like to think, though I have no proof, that after 10 years of having solar panels pay for all of my electric use AND power an EV for 60K miles, that my PV system has paid for itself, so I seem to go around with the idea that my power is now free. Actually, since PGE have agreed, they now pay me for excess generation, and I like that, too.

    If you start now, in a few years you can begin to think that maybe you, too, have gotten to the balance point and no longer have to pay for electricity. Well, at least for 20 more years or so.

    No, I don't feel smug. Just that it seemed to make sense then, and the longer I go, the more sense it makes YMMV.
     
  15. SByer

    SByer '08 #383

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    Cupertino, CA
    See Lloyd's post on CA rates. With a pool and fishtanks (gotta love those 24x7 power draws - I've made those tanks as efficient as I can, but getting rid of them has a near-zero WAF), we were creeping into tier 5. We estimate a ~7.3yr payoff on the solar. PG&E rates are definitely not cheap, but since the solar keeps us down at tier 1, if I did have to charge at home (I think it's been 6 months?) it'd be appropriately cheap.

    (Really, if you're a software company in the Bay Area, and you're not providing free charging at work, what's wrong with you?!?)
     
  16. PaulM

    PaulM Member

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    Ottawa, Canada
    #16 PaulM, Mar 12, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2012
    Actually, Quebec has an other option which is called the domestic dual-energy rate. As you can see from above, electricity is pretty cheap in Quebec thus many people heat their homes using electricity only. When temperatures plunge (and it gets pretty cold in Quebec) electricity demand climbs. In order to lower the demand during these peak periods they offer the dual-energy rate. Basically, your primary heat source is electricity and you have a secondary heat source (natural-gas, propane or oil) which kicks in when temperatures drop below -12C (or -15C depending on you zone). Fixed charge is the same.

    cost when temperature is equal or above -12C : $0.043
    cost when temperature is below -12C: $0.1832

    By the way, almost 98% of our electricity comes from hydro (hence the name Hydro-Quebec) and about 2% comes from nuclear (http://www.hydroquebec.com/sustainable-development/themes/index.html). I think it's pretty safe to say that an EV charged on the Quebec power grid truly is zero emissions. Now if I could only afford a Tesla. Maybe the Blustar or a used Model S. I did convince one of my friends to buy a Model S. I could buy it off him in five years.
     
  17. bonnie

    bonnie Oil is for sissies.

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    PGE rates are offensive ... and my new-ish solar system (this year) has eliminated the occasional foray into Tier 2/3/4 prices. Most days now I'm zero'd out. But a year ago, I had some outrageous bills. These are the current (winter) rates for Tiers 1-4.

    Fullscreen capture 3122012 45748 PM.bmp.jpg
     
  18. widodh

    widodh Model S R231 EU

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    That is high!

    It's a difference world-wide. I can get a dual-tariff meter, but that would give me 0.18 and 0.22 per kWh, based on night and day.

    The kWh prices here are always high and around the world the base-price seems to be low, but you can start paying a lot during the summer or winter.

    You shouldn't charge your Model S with the 85kWh pack in the middle of a hot summer day, that will cost you a lot.
     
  19. bonnie

    bonnie Oil is for sissies.

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    No kidding. My Roadster starts charging at 1am. I've shifted a lot of usage to off-peak hours - pool pump, car charging, delayed washer, delayed dishwasher, etc. The good news is that the excess energy I produce in the daytime is credited at the higher rate and the majority of what I use is billed at the lowest rate.
     
  20. KBF

    KBF Model S 2017

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    Location:
    Steinbach, MB, Canada
    In Manitoba our residential cost is $0.0662 per kWh, plus 1.4% provincial tax and 5% federal GST.

    There is no real net metering for my photovoltaic array; they give me the base rate for anything that feeds back into the grid. So, I will be charging my Tesla at high noon when possible.
     

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